Unibody Laptop Dual Drive

$24.95

Product code: IF107-080

 

Unibody Laptop Dual Drive

$24.95

Product code: IF107-080

Product Overview

Replace a laptop optical drive with a 9.5 mm SATA drive

  • CDs are fast becoming obsolete, yet data space never goes out of style.
  • Adds a lot more space to your laptop.
  • Add an SSD for your OS and most commonly used Apps to drastically increase your speed, while still keeping your old HDD for capacity.
  • Kit includes a USB to SATA adapter cable that will let you keep using your optical drive after it's been removed.
  • Does not include hard drive.
  • Hard drive limit of 750GB

Kit Contents:

  • SATA Optical Bay SATA Hard Drive Enclosure
  • Plastic Spudger
  • SATA USB Cable - continue using your optical drive after it's removed
  • iFixit Tool Pouch
  • 4 mm Precision Screwdriver Handle - includes the following bits:
    • Phillips #00
    • Torx T6
    • Torx T8
    • Pentalobe P6
    • Tri-wing Y1
    • Magnetic Pickup Bit

Compatibility

  • All Unibody MacBooks and Unibody MacBook Pros (excluding MacBook Pro Retina)

Product Details

$34.95 Upgrade Kit

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Everything you need to add a 9.5mm SATA hard drive to your laptop, while still being able to use your optical drive externally.

$24.95 Enclosure Only

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

This enclosure does not work with ATA drives or hard drives thicker than 9.5 mm.

Add to Cart
 

Install Videos

 

Replacement Guides

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Early 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2009

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2010

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2012

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 17" Unibody

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Unibody Model A1278

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Unibody Model A1342

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Compatibility

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
2.7 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.8 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009
2.26 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012
2.5 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.9 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody 2.53 GHz Mid 2009
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Early 2011
2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2008 and Early 2009
2.4 GHz (Late 2008)
2.53 GHz (Late 2008)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.8 GHz (Late 2008)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2011
2.2 GHz (Late 2011)
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2009
2.66 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2012
2.3 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.6 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.7 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Early 2011
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Unibody Model A1278
2 GHz (A1278)
2.4 GHz (A1278)
MacBook Unibody Model A1342
2.26 GHz (A1342)
2.4 GHz (A1342)
 

Stories

Aral's Story Photo #795578

My Problem

An extra hard drive sounded more practical than a DVD Drive

My Fix

I now have an extra 500GB for backups

My Advice

Follow the guides step by step. Pretty clear instructions

My Problem

My neighbors old unibody macbook was getting really slow, and the 160gb hard drive it came with was so full they kept having to move things off to an external drive just to keep the computer working.

My Fix

It went great, the guide was great. I found the comments about not removing the subwoofer cable very helpful, and did as was suggested and skipped that step. There is plenty of room to remove the optical drive without removing the subwoofer cable.

The only place I ran into an issue was when I was installing the hard drive enclosure. I used the original 160gb hard drive and it was just a little thicker then I felt the optical bay could handle, I had to apply some light pressure to get the screws to seat correctly.

I installed a new SSD in the factory hard drive space, vastly improving the performance of the computer. Since I reused the original hard drive in the optical bay, I didn't run into any issues with the speed of the drive as some have reported.

My Advice

I found it hard to find a drive that was clearly just SATA II (3gbps), so ended up reusing the original hard drive that came with the laptop. I had hoped to put something bigger in, but I wasn't comfortable with the level of information I could find on larger drives and their compatibility with the slower optical bay connections. Since I was doing this for a friend, I wanted it to be bullet proof.

My Problem

So I was having an issue with a bad sector in my 500gb Hard Drive that came standard in my Late 2011 MacBook Pro. I wanted to also to increase my internal storage as I travel a lot and tired of caring around an External hard drive. I researched several Hard Drive replacements and by far the 1 TB SSD Hard Drive that iFixit offered was superior to the rest. I also like the idea of replacing my Optic Drive with the Old hard drive as I hardly ever use my optic drive anymore.

My Fix

The install went perfect. It took me pretty much 1 hour to take out the old hard drive and Optic drive, and install the new Hard drive and Old Hard drive into the optic drive adapter. Very Simple to do with the instructions provided... now it took another 5 hours to re-install the software but the hardware was a snap.

My Advice

1. Backup using TimeMachine JUST before you shut your computer Off to Upgrade

2. Must have an 8gb or greater USB Drive to load OS onto so you can install on your new Hard Drive.

3. PRINT out the instructions for installing the Hardware and steps for re-installing the software.

My Problem

The age of my 2011 MacBookPro put me at a crossroads: newer laptop + same storage space (w/spinning HDD) + pay more + waste unnecessary resources? Or same laptop + triple storage space (& SSD) + pay less + save environment? MacBookPros are resilient machines that last a long time if you take good care of them. I needed a faster working machine, same form factor, and keep my MacBookPro going for more years.

My Fix

The repair went well. Unfortunately the spudger was the only useful tool. The iFixIt Phillips screwdriver set was not working and I resorted to using my older toolkit to get the job done. The dual drive SuperDrive-shaped bay was difficult to install because the screw mounts were placed a little too close to the case that the screws could not fit in without forcing them through and the mounts were slightly bigger than the SuperDrive mounts. It was a very tight squeeze after many minute adjustments sneaking in the dual drive SuperDrive-shaped bay into the spot where the original SuperDrive went.

My Advice

When replacing a perfectly usable hard drive with an SSD, look at all options to clone the old drive to the new drive and back up the old drive using Time Machine. When cloning a drive without a SATA to USB connector, the dual drive SuperDrive-shaped bay will work connecting the new drive in the bay and connecting it with the optical bay SATA to USB cable. Always have an extra set of tools in case the purchased tools don't work. Find an external enclosure for both the spare SuperDrive and original HDD. At least then you have accessories whenever you need them!

My Problem

I needed more memory and my disk drive was already busted plus i don't use it anyway so its just easier to throw a Wd blue 1 TB 2.5 drive in its place.

My Fix

The drive swap went great installing windows 8.1 for dual booting (with el captain) went well but the High Definition audio controller fails to start and no sound devices are recognized as installed, tried all solutions to no avail, only thing that works is usb headphones.

My Advice

Might be a great time to clean out your fan!

My Problem

Small SSD needed to move data that was hogging up space on my SSD

My Fix

Installed the 1TB secondary drive to replace the rom drive bay. Very easy to do 20min at max. I then moved all user files to the larger HDD and freed up 60GB of data and new the OS has its own dedicated ssd, and data is separate.

My Advice

Worth every penny and I got a tool kit for my mac for future upgrades.

My Problem

I follow the guides from Ifixit , great guides no problems, the mac would not accept my new seagate 1 tb sata hybrid drive, so I mount an older seagate 500 gb normal sata drive.

I later put the seagate 1tb into my acer 17" pc laptop with an xtra hardisk bay

My Fix

Really easy, good guides

My Advice

just do it, its easy

My Problem

My MacBook was stock , 5 years old, and I ran out of space on the hard drive, had 2-3 external hard drives die on me and relied on them to free up space. Wanted to not have to worry about media storage, computer speed and quickness of operation. Couldn't afford a brand new MacBook or IMac.

My Fix

Very well. Changed out the optical drive with a Samsung Pro 500g SSD first, used Carbon Copy Cloner to transfer all data from my original drive to mirror it, then rebooted the computer with the installed SSD to run the IOS. Once I knew that worked, I swapped out the original hard drive with a 2T Toshiba hard drive to store all of my media. I also swapped out the ram to get me to 8G total. Next step is to swap the battery. Printed off the Ifixit guide for my computer and followed it extensively.

My Advice

I updated my IOS to El Capitan prior to the hardware swap, and backed up everything on my external hard drive before anything. I watched multiple videos on YouTube for two days prior to anything. I also had to reference the Apple help forums for many things, specifically the commands required on startup to switch drives for booting and to initiate several command prompts. I am about as average as it comes with Macs, but I did a bunch of research and homework and came out with a super MacBook Pro. The Ifixit install kit and instructions were perfect for what I wanted to do. I can use my optical drive anytime with the included attachment. Also downloaded a trim program to manage the SSD more efficiently. The Software piece is a bit more difficult than the hardware "surgery". So I highly recommend studying how to access your IOSs functions and research the appropriate software to make your system run more efficiently. Thanks!

My Problem

I spilt wine on my macbook and it destroyed the keyboard. I had to use a USB keyboard for years until I somehow came upon this fix it site. My curiosity was peaked. I saw I could purchase the keyboard separate so I ordered it along with the dual hard drive enclosure to replace my defunct optical drive. I also ordered 16 GB of ram and a 480GB SSD drive to upgrade the current components.

My Fix

I would be blind going at this alone, but with this site's extremely easy to follow guide I replaced my unibody keyboard, swapped out my optical drive with a dual HDD (which used to be the original hard drive), upgraded my ram from 2GB up to 16GB and changed my HDD to an SSD. I was ready to scrap this macbook, but because of this site my macbook is working like new and fully upgraded.

My Advice

My advice is to simply use a muffin tin to seperate screws for each step to not mix them up. Otherwise follow the guide and it should be really easy. Saved lots of money by fixing it myself. The only hard part (but not really hard) was making an exact bootable copy of the existing hard drive to the new one.

My Problem

A friend of mine requested my service for a complete upgrade (and replacement of coffee soaked keyboard) including memory, SSD, Extreme Airport card and activation of Handoff/Continuity as well as replacement of optical drive for mass storage hard drive.

My Fix

iFixit states 750GB upgrade potential for the unibody Macbook dual drive upgrade. Realistically, any SATA 2.5 inch drive no taller than 9.5mm should be accepted but see "My Advice" section below.

The dis-assembly was a cake walk and re-installation no problem. I purchased a 2 TB drive to put in the new caddie Upon booting, OSX told me it could not initialize the drive. Furthermore when attempting to format the device....nothing. I removed it and using software to format it from my PC ahead of time, reinstalled into the Macbook Pro and... OSX was still unable to do anything with it.

It was at this time I started with the Google-Fu and stumbled across a dark corner of a Mac forum where the users began to discuss an issue that was found in all 2011 Macbook Pro's . The SATA ports were rated for the new SATA III revision (always has and will be backward compatible per official spec) but many were reporting complete failure to read SATA III (6 Gb/s) drives such as current SSD's at all. Eventually Apple quietly issued a EFI fix, but guess what? For only the main drive port! Alas, if you own a 2011 Macbook Pro 15", under no circumstance can you install a SATA III drive in the dual drive caddie to replace the optical drive. Some have reported rare instances where 13" and 17" are okay and possibly first run or last run 15" but the consensus is: Only SATA II (3 Gb/s) drive will be recognized using the optical SATA port.

I verified the caddie was okay with a junk spare drive and just drew up the RMA request for returning the shiny 2 TB 2.5" drive and will be purchasing 1 TB to my dismay. Unfortunately, SATA II drives for laptops grew no larger than this before the switch to SATA III. Under normal circumstances, all SATA drives and revisions are backward and frontward compatible with one another meaning that any revision drive will run in any revision port. The only potential drawback is total throughput. This is not the case with the 2011 Macbook Pro optical drive port.

My Advice

I received some of this information from another company that sells these caddies. My suggestion is that iFixit post some of the compatibility information for themselves on their site. Unfortunately, Apple, ever concerned of their image as "it just works", never allowed this to be known accept by those who ran across it, so expect no info from them directly. Below is the blurb from the other site warning of this issue:

MAIN BAY: A 6G SSD may be utilized in main bay (move drive or second SSD into Optical Bay*) for reliable SATA Revision 3.0 6Gb/s performance in excess of 500MB/s.

(Model ID MacBookPro8,3) models. After successfully applying this update, your Boot ROM Version will be: MBP81.0047.B1E.

OPTICAL BAY: The optical bay interface may either be SATA Revision 2.0 3Gb/s (300MB/s max) OR SATA Revision 3.0 6Gb/s. There is no way to specify/order this data interface with Apple, but you can confirm what interface version your optical bay offers by using 'About this Mac, More Info, Serial-ATA' info display.

Testing has demonstrated that Apple factory hardware does not reliably support a 6G (6Gb/s) Solid State Drive or Hard Disk Drive in the optical bay of 2011 MacBook Pros (ModeI ID8,1; 8,2; 8,3). If your bundle comes with a 6G drive, you should ONLY install that drive in the main drive bay and utilize the it to re-task your existing drive or install a new 3G SSD or HDD in the optical bay. PRE-2011 models can utilize a 6G drive in the optical bay, but will do so at a reduced 3G (3Gb/s) speed.

MacBook Pro 13" models: Apple does not support the use of 6Gb/s drives in the optical bay. While we have observed a high rate of success using SATA 3.0 6Gb/s drives in Apple 13" bays where 6Gb/s link is present, some systems may not operate properly with this setup. For guaranteed reliability/compatibility, we suggest 6Gb/s drives be used in the main drive bay only, and 3Gb/s hard drives or SSDs be used in the optical bay when a two-drive configuration is desired. We cannot guarantee proper or successful 6Gb/s drive operation in the Apple MacBook Pro 13" optical bay.