Arctic Silver Thermal Paste

$8.95

Product code: IF179-010-1

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Arctic Silver Thermal Paste

$8.95

Product code: IF179-010-1

Product Overview

The most important step to keeping your CPU cool.

  • Thermal paste forms a continuous, conductive layer between a processor and its head sink, improving cooling performance and keeping your important chips from overheating.
  • Whenever you remove a heat sink, it's very important to remove the old thermal paste and apply a new layer.
  • To thoroughly clean and prepare thermal surfaces before applying a new layer of Arctic Silver, use Arctic Silver ArctiClean
  • Arctic Silver 5 is made of 99.9% pure silver and is not electrically conductive. See arcticsilver.com for more specs.

Compatibility

  • All machines requiring thermal paste.

Product Details

  $8.95

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

One year warranty

Notes:

  • This product cannot be shipped to Mexico.
  • Este producto no puede enviarse a México.

50+ Available

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Compatibility

iMac G5 17" Model A1058
1.6 GHz
1.8 GHz (EMC No. 1989)
1.8 GHz (EMC No. 2055)
2 GHz
iMac G5 17" Model A1144
1.9 GHz
iMac G5 20" Model A1076
1.8 GHz
2 GHz
iMac G5 20" Model A1145
2.1 GHz
iMac Intel 17"
1.83 GHz (EMC No. 2104)
1.83 GHz (EMC No. 2110)
1.83 GHz (EMC No. 2124)
2 GHz
2.16 GHz
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2105 and 2118
2 GHz (EMC No. 2105)
2.16 GHz
2.33 GHz
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2133 and 2210
2 GHz (EMC No. 2133)
2.4 GHz (EMC No. 2133)
2.4 GHz (EMC No. 2210)
2.66 GHz (EMC No. 2210)
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2266
2.66 GHz (EMC No. 2266)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2308
3.06 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
3.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2389
3.06 GHz (Core i3)
3.2 GHz (Core i3)
3.6 GHz (Core i5)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2428
2.5 GHz (Core i5)
2.7 GHz (Core i5)
2.8 GHz (Core i7)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2544
2.7 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
2.9 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
3.1 GHz (Core i7, Late 2012)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2638
2.7 GHz (Core i5, Late 2013)
2.9 GHz (Core i5, Late 2013)
3.1 GHz (Core i7, Late 2013)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2805
1.4 GHz (Core i5, Mid 2014)
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2111
2.16 GHz
2.33 GHz
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2134 and 2211
2.4 GHz
2.8 GHz (EMC No. 2134)
2.8 GHz (EMC No. 2211)
3.06 GHz (EMC No. 2211)
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2267
2.66 GHz
2.93 GHz
3.06 GHz (EMC No. 2267)
iMac Intel 27"
2.66 GHz (Quad Core i5)
2.7 GHz (Core i5)
2.8 GHz (Quad Core i5)
2.8 GHz (Quad Core i7)
2.93 GHz (Quad Core i7)
3.06 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
3.1 GHz (Core i5)
3.2 GHz (Core i3)
3.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
3.4 GHz (Core i7)
3.6 GHz (Core i5)
iMac Intel 27" EMC 2546
2.9 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
3.2 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
3.4 GHz (Core i7, Late 2012)
iMac Intel 27" EMC 2639
3.2 GHz (Core i5, Late 2013)
3.4 GHz (Core i5, Late 2013)
3.5 GHz (Core i7, Late 2013)
iMac Intel 27" Retina 5K Display
3.5 GHz (Late 2014)
4.0 GHz (Late 2014)
Mac mini (PowerPC)
1.25 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.42 GHz
1.5 GHz
Mac mini Intel
1.4 GHz (Dual i5, Late 2014)
2.6 GHz (Dual i5, Late 2014)
2.8 GHz (Dual i5, Late 2014)
3.0 GHz (Dual i7, Late 2014)
Mac Mini Late 2012
2.3 GHz (Quad i7, Late 2012)
2.5 GHz (Dual i5, Late 2012)
2.6 GHz (Quad i7, Late 2012)
Mac Mini Mid 2011
2 GHz (Quad i7, Mid 2011)
2.3 GHz (Dual i5, Mid 2011)
2.5 GHz (Dual i5, Mid 2011)
2.7 GHz (Dual i7, Mid 2011)
Mac mini Model A1176
1.5 GHz (Core Solo, A1176)
1.66 GHz (Core Duo, Early 2006)
1.66 GHz (Core Duo, Late 2006)
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2007)
1.83 GHz (Core Duo, Late 2006)
2 GHz (Core 2 Duo, A1176)
Mac mini Model A1283
2 GHz (Core 2 Duo, A1283)
2.26 GHz (A1283)
2.53 GHz (A1283)
2.66 GHz (A1283)
Mac mini Model A1347
2.4 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2010)
MacBook Air 11"
1.6 GHz (Early 2015)
2.2 GHz (Early 2015)
MacBook Air 11" Early 2014
1.4 GHz (Early 2014)
1.7 GHz (Early 2014)
MacBook Air 11" Mid 2011
1.6 GHz (Mid 2011)
1.8 GHz (Mid 2011)
MacBook Air 11" Mid 2012
1.7 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.0 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Air 11" Mid 2013
1.3 GHz (Mid 2013)
1.7 GHz (Mid 2013)
MacBook Air 11" Model A1370
1.4 GHz (Late 2010)
1.6 GHz (Late 2010)
MacBook Air 13"
1.6 GHz (Early 2015)
2.2 Ghz (Early 2015)
MacBook Air 13" Early 2014
1.4 GHz (Early 2014)
1.7 GHz (Early 2014)
MacBook Air 13" Mid 2011
1.7 GHz (Mid 2011)
1.8 GHz (Mid 2011)
MacBook Air 13" Mid 2012
1.8 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.0 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Air 13" Mid 2013
1.3 GHz (Mid 2013)
1.7 GHz (Mid 2013)
MacBook Air 13" Model A1369
1.86 GHz (Late 2010)
2.13 GHz (Late 2010)
MacBook Air Models A1237 and A1304
1.6 GHz (Late 2008)
1.6 GHz (Original)
1.8 GHz (Original)
1.86 GHz (Late 2008)
1.86 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.13 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Core 2 Duo
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2 GHz (C2D, Late 2006)
2 GHz (C2D, Mid 2007)
2 GHz (Early 2009)
2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.1 GHz (Penryn)
2.13 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
MacBook Core Duo
1.83 GHz (Core Duo)
2 GHz (Core Duo)
MacBook Pro 13" Retina Display Early 2013
2.6 GHz (Early 2013)
3.0 GHz (Early 2013)
MacBook Pro 13" Retina Display Late 2012
2.5 GHz (Late 2012)
2.9 GHz (Late 2012)
MacBook Pro 13" Retina Display Late 2013
2.4 GHz (Late 2013)
2.6 GHz (Late 2013)
2.8 GHz (Late 2013)
MacBook Pro 13" Retina Display Mid 2014
2.6 GHz (Mid 2014)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2014)
3.0 GHz (Mid 2014)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
2.7 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.8 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009
2.26 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012
2.5 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.9 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Model A1211
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Models A1226 and A1260
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
MacBook Pro 15" Core Duo Model A1150
1.83 GHz (Core Duo)
2 GHz (Core Duo)
2.16 GHz (Core Duo)
MacBook Pro 15" Retina Display Early 2013
2.4 GHz (Early 2013)
2.7 GHz (Early 2013)
2.8 GHz (Early 2013)
MacBook Pro 15" Retina Display Late 2013
2.0 GHz (IG, Late 2013)
2.3 GHz (DG, Late 2013)
2.3 GHz (IG, Late 2013)
2.6 GHz (DG, Late 2013)
2.6 GHz (IG, Late 2013)
MacBook Pro 15" Retina Display Mid 2012
2.3 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.6 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.7 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 15" Retina Display Mid 2014
2.2 GHz (IG, Mid 2014)
2.5 GHz (DG, Mid 2014)
2.5 GHz (IG, Mid 2014)
2.8 GHz (DG, Mid 2014)
2.8 GHz (IG, Mid 2014)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody 2.53 GHz Mid 2009
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Early 2011
2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2008 and Early 2009
2.4 GHz (Late 2008)
2.53 GHz (Late 2008)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.8 GHz (Late 2008)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2011
2.2 GHz (Late 2011)
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2009
2.66 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2012
2.3 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.6 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.7 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 17" Models A1151 A1212 A1229 and A1261
2.16 GHz (Core Duo)
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Early 2011
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Unibody Model A1278
2 GHz (A1278)
2.4 GHz (A1278)
MacBook Unibody Model A1342
2.26 GHz (A1342)
2.4 GHz (A1342)
MBP Retina 13"
2.7 GHz (Early 2015)
2.9 GHz (Early 2015)
3.1 Ghz (Early 2015)
PlayStation 3
CECHA
CECHB
CECHC
CECHE
CECHG
CECHH
CECHJ
CECHK
CECHL
CECHM
CECHP
CECHQ
PlayStation 3 Slim
CECH-20xx
CECH-21xx
CECH-25xx
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 12" 1-1.5 GHz
1 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.5 GHz
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 12" 867 MHz
867 MHz
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 15" 1-1.5 GHz
1 GHz
1.25 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.5 GHz (BT 1.1)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 15" 1.5-1.67 GHz
1.5 GHz (BT 2.0)
1.67 GHz (Low-Res)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 15" 1.67 GHz
1.67 GHz (High-Res)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 17" 1-1.67 GHz
1 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.5 GHz
1.67 GHz (Low-Res)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 17" 1.67 GHz (High-Res)
1.67 GHz (High-Res)
Xbox 360
Falcon
Jasper
Opus
Xenon
Zephyr
Xbox 360 S
Valhalla
Xbox One
Xbox One
 

Stories

My Problem

I had a family reunion, and a nephew was playing my PS4, got a little excited and pulled the PS4 off of my tv stand. I had the controller connected to the charge cable, won't do that ever again when they use it. My warranty ran out with sony literally a few days before this occurred. I ended up opening it up myself, I found that the motherboard was cracked.

My Fix

Well, the repair in general was a little crazy, I had to locate another motherboard of the same model. I found one on ebay that was decently priced, only thing wrong with it was that the HDMI port was broken, so I ordered a new port on the side as well. I didn't have soldering equipment so I brought it to a local pc repair shop, they soldered it for me for $5. Then using the guide on the Ifixit site, I took it apart, fixed it all together with the thermal paste and everything, and put it together, and it was good as new!

My Advice

Be very careful when getting the motherboard from ebay, you may see some which seem fine, but aren't. Normally when they are providing other components with it, somethings wrong. Look for one with a broken HDMI port, that's normally the most easiest to fix, but most people on ebay don't really know that for some reason. If they have to solder, it seems to be beyond them.

My Problem

Easy to do and very inexpensive way to get computer working

My Fix

Very well for a novice at this type of repair.

Great instructions. Could have used info on material to use in replacing the heat sensor to the HD. I used a silicon paste, but wasn't sure this was the right answer. Seems to work fine.

My Advice

For the HD heat sensor cable, I would recommend taking it off at the mother board. i damaged the connector at the HD end (one pin came loose in connector) and had to carefully replace it. Mother board cable connector is much more robust.

My Problem

Broken screen and loss of battery life through normal daily use.

My Fix

It went very well! The spareparts were of usual high quality, packaging very good and the guide was easy to use.

1,5 hours used including preparation of tools and cleaning up afterwards.

A few worries though - The cables for the screen were squished and the adhesive behind the battery had lost efficiency, but everything runs really well so far.

My Advice

Preparation is the key. If your screen is broken, be patient with removing the screen. It is a tight fit on the iphone 5.

My Problem

One morning my computer would not turn on. My fan was running but my screen was black. PRAM and SMC reset did nothing for my computer, so i decided to try replacing the logic board.

My Fix

THe repair went well. It worked! Trust in the guide

My Advice

Label your screws by step number and be careful about re-routing your wires in the correct place when you're putting it all back together.

This repair is not for the faint of heart.

My Problem

Macbook Pro's display won't wake up after sleep, restarts when awake and while sleeping. Typical issues many Macbook Pro users are having with the i7 model. When rebooting, display comes up segmented and it doesn't get past first portion of startup without leaving display white. Reset SMC, PRAM, everything everyone else has tried. Sometimes this brings system back to life but usually need to boot from backup drive before it magically starts again. Rebuilt system, still problems so trying the thermal paste repair.

My Fix

The removal of the motherboard went surprising well, even the two ribbon cables came off and went back on easily. Cleaned off old paste following directions and applied ample amount of new paste. Put everything back together and am testing. It started back up but it usually would run for a week before messing up again. At least it wakes from sleep properly so far. I'm not going to try and re-ball the CPU and GPU, that's out of my comfort zone. I've monitored the temperature levels and after the first day they seemed to drop down so hopefully the paste is helping.

My Advice

In hindsight, don't buy a Macbook Pro, especially the i7 from this time period. This particular model just ran too hot. Of course they came out with a lower powered CPU the in 2012 and I don't believe these have the same problems.

My Problem

My computer wasn't working anymore, a bug well known from the macbook pro late 2011.

My Fix

The repair went fine. It was easy to follow the instructions on ifixit to take out the motherboard. Then 7m30 at 190 degres on the oven, and my computer was like now when i turned it on again.

My Advice

If you hqve the same problem, and you no more have guarantee, then just open your macbook pro, it will be much less expensive than sending it to repair, and it works very well.

My Problem

I repair my own and friends' and clients' computers, I needed to stock up on tools and supplies.

My Fix

To quote Al Green's song: 'How can you mend a broken heart?" These tools didn't do it...

My Advice

Yea. Don't ask a wiseacre like me for advice, I'll tell you to wear clean underwear in case you get in an accident.

Enrico Barbieri's Story Photo #411357
Enrico Barbieri's Story Photo #411359
Enrico Barbieri's Story Photo #411360

My Problem

My MacBook fans will always run at max speed while using heavy apps like VMware Fusion. The situation was critical mainly because of the noise of fans running at 6200rpm

My Fix

The repair went well... I opened the MacBook without any particular issue thanks to the heat sink replace guide provided by iFixt. Just moving really slowly because I was afraid of broking some contacts and mess up everything...

My Advice

Repair is basically easy even if you need to disassemble half of your MacBook... Watch out for cables and plug while you put logic board in place... If it does not fit perfectly there are some cables on your way

My Problem

After spending a cool $250 to get my top case replaced by Apple (the keyboard kicked the bucked 2 months out of AppleCare - go figure!), my newly-repaired laptop refused to charge my battery. It worked fine on DC power, but the battery just slowly drained until it was dead.

I tried multiple chargers, a SMC reset, unplugging the battery, nothing worked. The 'Genius' at the Apple store told me that I'd need a logic board replacement, and blamed the fact that it wouldn't charge on me replacing the optical drive with a Data Doubler. He also denied the existence of any components on the logic board that could be replaced, insisting that I'd 'shorted out' the board and that was the reason for it not working.

I suspected a bad MagSafe DC-in board. The part was only $35 on iFixit, and since the worst that could happen was that I'd have a non-functional computer, which I already had, I decided to give the DIY repair a go.

My Fix

The repair was SHOCKINGLY easy. It was described as 'Difficult' on the iFixit site, which I assume is a fair categorization considering the potential damage that one could do. I have a fair amount of mechanical aptitude, but no experience repairing computers. I made sure to constantly ground myself to the frame, keep careful track of the screws, and move with patience.

Once I got the logic board off, I decided to try my hand at replacing the thermal paste application, since it's notoriously bad on these models. It was a little finicky, but all ended well.

Reassembly was slightly harder than disassembly, due to connectors wanting to get trapped under the logic board. Getting the keyboard ribbon back into the ZIF socket was the hardest part of the whole endeavor.

Removing the old DC-In board revealed the reason for my computer's charging problem: When the Apple techs reassembled my computer, they sandwiched one of the DC-in board's wires in a screw hole. The insulating material had worn through, and the exposed metal of the wire was short-circuiting the board. TOTALLY an Apple error. What are the odds I would have heard about this if I'd taken it in for the suggested logic board replacement?

After everything was re-assembled, I plugged it in and got a magical green/amber light from the charger! But when I pressed the power button, nothing happened. I let it charge for a while, tried again and, nothing. I tried reconnecting the keyboard ribbon, but to no avail. I figured that I'd ACTUALLY shorted something out this time, and that I was going to have to send it back. Sadness ensued, and my feelings of victory quickly faded.

Then, like Lazarus risen from the dead, I heard the sound of the startup chime! Success! As it turns out, the battery was just 100% depleted, and needed a bit to charge. I booted it up and everything was good as new!

My Advice

You can do all of these repairs yourself if you know what you're getting into and you're patient.

Go slowly. Read all of the instructions (AND THE COMMENTS) twice before you begin. Use an ice cube tray to keep track of the screws. Believe in yourself. Eat your vegetables.

Be grateful for iFixit! It's a great resource or all of us!

My Problem

plays for a short period cuts out informed power supply was cause not enough in bank to cover cost of replacement

My Fix

have not started yet TR10 screw wont fit to0 screws in CD slot on sony cech model ps3 too big

My Advice

Not yet too busy fixing front steps on house