Introduction

Use this guide if your new display assembly comes with the front-facing camera and sensor assembly and the display EMI shield already installed. All you need to do is remove the old display assembly and transfer the home button to the new display assembly.

If your replacement display does not include those parts, follow the longer version of this guide here.

In either case, it's important to transfer the original home button onto the new display in order for Touch ID (fingerprint scanning) to function.

You can also use this guide to replace the front panel assembly cable bracket.

Image 1/1: Power off your iPhone before beginning disassembly.
  • Before disassembling your iPhone, discharge the battery below 25%. A charged lithium-ion battery can catch fire and/or explode if accidentally punctured.

  • Power off your iPhone before beginning disassembly.

  • Remove the two 3.4 mm P2 Pentalobe screws on the bottom edge of the iPhone, next to the Lightning connector.

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Image 1/1: Apply a suction cup to the lower left corner of the display assembly.
  • Opening the display on the 6s separates a thin strip of adhesive around the perimeter of the display. If you prefer to replace the adhesive, have a set of new adhesive strips ready before you continue. It's possible to complete the repair without replacing the adhesive, and you probably won't notice any difference in functionality.

  • Apply a suction cup to the lower left corner of the display assembly.

    • Take care not to place the suction cup over the home button.

Hello, I was wondering if there was a guide of how to replace the adhesive strips, thank you

Pablo Reyes - Reply

The suction cup will not work if you have a shattered screen. I put a tip of an exacto knife between the glass and side frame above the power connector, carefully pried up then used the spluger to pry the rest of the way up.

johnmurphyjr - Reply

Tape will work as well in order to create a smooth surface

Nick Stine -

Image 1/2: Take your time and apply firm, constant force. The display assembly is a much tighter fit than most devices and is held down with adhesive. Image 2/2: Pulling too hard may damage the display assembly. Apply just enough pressure to create a small gap between the display assembly and the rear case.
  • Pull up on the suction cup with firm, constant pressure to create a slight gap between the front panel and rear case.

    • Take your time and apply firm, constant force. The display assembly is a much tighter fit than most devices and is held down with adhesive.

  • Pulling too hard may damage the display assembly. Apply just enough pressure to create a small gap between the display assembly and the rear case.

No, really. Do this on a table and use less strength than you think. If you open the display the whole way at this step you can easily rip the home button connections and one of several display connections at the top. <— too much experience... :(

chuymatt - Reply

Wow, that was tough. Patience, patience, patience. Did not use the iOpener, just firm and consistent pulling with the phone on a flat surface. When the suction cup comes off... clean the display surface and go back at it. I did use the pointed end of a spudger inserted into the headphone jack to hold down the bottom case whilst I pulled on the suction cup. Once there was sufficient room (see next step) you can just get the spudger (flat end) to slide in slightly.

plisi - Reply

If you're lifting up on the glass, how are you supposed to hold the rest of the phone down? Is it by holding the camera end down with the side of your hand and rotating your hand, or using your other hand (not pictured) on the edges (seems very difficult), or using a spudger in a jack?

Bryan - Reply

On the 6s, which has an annoying black adhesive strip holding the display assembly on, I use the iSclack to loosen a very small area near the home button then insert a thin spudger and gently twist it a bit to release the adhesive. Do this around the bottom and both sides of the phone to release the screen. I usually have to break some of the adhesive strands when the opening is big enough.

scentaur - Reply

My spudgers just too thick for initial insertion. In the end, fingernail on my thumb got me started, and I was able to get plastic picks in there to work it. The microwavable iOpener gel strip really helped.

Heidi Moser - Reply

Image 1/2: Place the flat edge of a spudger into the gap between the screen and rear case, directly above the headphone jack. Image 2/2: Place the flat edge of a spudger into the gap between the screen and rear case, directly above the headphone jack.
  • There is a notch on the underside of the display, just above the headphone jack. This is the safest place to begin prying the phone open.

  • Place the flat edge of a spudger into the gap between the screen and rear case, directly above the headphone jack.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Twist the spudger to widen the gap between the front panel assembly and the rest of the phone.

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Image 1/2: Slide the spudger up the side of the phone to separate the adhesive and pop the clips free. Image 2/2: Slide the spudger up the side of the phone to separate the adhesive and pop the clips free.
  • Insert the flat end of the spudger on the left side of the phone, between the display assembly and rear case.

  • Slide the spudger up the side of the phone to separate the adhesive and pop the clips free.

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Image 1/2: Slide the spudger to the right, along the bottom edge of the phone. Image 2/2: Slide the spudger to the right, along the bottom edge of the phone.
  • Remove the spudger and reinsert it on the bottom edge, where you pried the phone open.

  • Slide the spudger to the right, along the bottom edge of the phone.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Slide the spudger up the right side to continue separating the adhesive and popping the display clips free from the iPhone.

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Image 1/2: Don't open the display more than 90º, as it is still connected at the top by three cables that may break if stretched. Image 2/2: Don't open the display more than 90º, as it is still connected at the top by three cables that may break if stretched.
  • Use the suction cup to open the display, breaking the last of the adhesive.

  • Don't open the display more than 90º, as it is still connected at the top by three cables that may break if stretched.

Prop it up on something

Nick Stine - Reply

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Pull up on the nub on the top side of the suction cup to remove it from the front panel.

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Image 1/3: Open the display to about a 90º angle, and lean it against something to keep it propped up while you're working on the phone. Image 2/3: Add a rubber band to keep the display securely in place while you work. This prevents undue strain on the display cables. Image 3/3: In a pinch, you can use an unopened canned beverage to hold the display.
  • Gently grasp the display assembly and lift it up to open the phone, using the clips at the top of the front panel as a hinge.

  • Open the display to about a 90º angle, and lean it against something to keep it propped up while you're working on the phone.

    • Add a rubber band to keep the display securely in place while you work. This prevents undue strain on the display cables.

    • In a pinch, you can use an unopened canned beverage to hold the display.

Smart idea :)

x226 - Reply

on the third picture, the screen is opened more than 90 degrees.

Mirza Zohaib - Reply

It said about 90 degrees

Nick Stine -

Image 1/1: One 2.9 mm screw
  • Remove the two Phillips screws securing the battery connector bracket:

    • One 2.9 mm screw

    • One 2.2 mm screw

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Remove the battery connector bracket from the iPhone.

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Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • Use the point of a spudger to disconnect the battery connector by prying it straight up from the logic board.

Be sure not to skip this step. It is crucial. I have had many repairs where the screen will not light up after the repair if the battery had not been disconnected and reconnected.

Andrew spoelstra - Reply

Thanks for the tip, Andrew.

William Turner -

It should also be mentioned, DO NOT USE A METAL SPUDGER. You could short the battery to other nearby metal parts. I've done that, the battery clip arced to the metal cover on some of the logic board chips, and my phone wouldn't power back on for 3 days. They should put a caution caption on this step. I've had this happen on a 5S as well.

Frank - Reply

Thanks for the tip, Frank.

William Turner -

SERIOUS WARNING!: During *reassembly*, you should NOT reconnect the battery connector until the VERY LAST step (upon reassembly!), as many people, including myself, apparently have smoked (burned, destroyed) the main Logic board. This happens when you reconnect the LCD/digitizer assembly FPC cable. ifixit should modify this instruction to be very explicit about this!

enoughstatic - Reply

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Push the battery connector away from the logic board until it stays separated from its socket, so as to avoid any accidental connection to the battery while you work.

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Image 1/1: Three 1.2 mm screws
  • Remove the following four Phillips screws securing the display cable bracket:

    • Three 1.2 mm screws

    • One 2.8 mm screw

Thank you for this great guide!

I was able to skip removing the display assembly and logic board steps and lay the speaker upside down on the bottom edge of the logic board without putting undue pressure on the antenna cable making this a much easier and quicker repair for me. If you choose to leave the display assembly connected, I recommend using a rubber band to hold it to a box of similar size at a 90 degree angle to prevent damage and stress to the attached cables.

So, the steps I skipped were Steps 16 through 34 and Steps 37 through 45.

scentaur - Reply

The 1.2mm screw in the top left corner is refusing to come out, any help?

Harry Allinson - Reply

why does the battery fix kit not include the #00 bit needed to unscrew all 3 1.2mm screws?!?! !#^&@@ off.

robertdjclark - Reply

Either a #00 or a #000 bit should work fine here. Some #0 bits will also work if the point is fine enough. Same goes for a lot of JIS bits. As long as it doesn't strip or slip, you're good.

Jeff Suovanen -

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Remove the display cable bracket.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Use the flat end of a spudger, or a fingernail, to disconnect the front camera flex cable by prying it straight up from its socket on the logic board.

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Image 1/2: When reconnecting the digitizer cable, '''do not press the center of the connector'''. Press one end of the connector, then press the opposite end. Pressing in the center of the connector can bend the component and cause digitizer damage. Image 2/2: When reconnecting the digitizer cable, '''do not press the center of the connector'''. Press one end of the connector, then press the opposite end. Pressing in the center of the connector can bend the component and cause digitizer damage.
  • Use the flat end of a spudger, or a fingernail, to disconnect the digitizer cable by prying it straight up from its socket on the logic board.

  • When reconnecting the digitizer cable, do not press the center of the connector. Press one end of the connector, then press the opposite end. Pressing in the center of the connector can bend the component and cause digitizer damage.

Recolor that "pinned" note about not pushing on the center in "RED" if you get a chance. Just sayin'.

William Turner - Reply

Good call. Thanks for the tip!

Evan Noronha -

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Use the flat end of a spudger, or a fingernail, to disconnect the display data cable by prying it straight up from its socket on the logic board.

I notice there are 3 flex cables, does this disassembly guide apply to the verizon version of iPhone 6s? I don't want to order the wrong digitizer screen for my new and improved iPhone that i somehow managed to crack the screen on.

Bailey Duncan - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Remove the display assembly.

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Image 1/1:
  • Remove the three 1.7 mm Phillips screws securing the home button bracket.

When reinstalling, I had to experiment with how tightly to turn the screws, I first turned them all the way in but the home button wouldn't 'click' at all then, so I loosened the left most screw a touch and now it clicks and feel perfect. Not sure which screw is technically the best to adjust.

amadscientist - Reply

Image 1/3: Slide the bracket out from under the EMI shield to remove it. Image 2/3: Slide the bracket out from under the EMI shield to remove it. Image 3/3: Slide the bracket out from under the EMI shield to remove it.
  • Lift the lower edge of the home button bracket until it clears the small peg on the right side.

  • Slide the bracket out from under the EMI shield to remove it.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Use a spudger to disconnect the home button connector by popping it out of its socket on the back of the display panel.

Make sure you're not heating it before you've popped the connector from its socket or else the socket might come loose.

Sam Decrock - Reply

Image 1/1: [https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iOpener+Heating/25705|Prepare an iOpener] and lay it over the lower edge of the front panel to soften the adhesive on the home button gasket.
  • Heating the home button will make the gasket adhesive softer an easier to remove without damage. You can use a hairdryer, iOpener, or equivalent tool to warm the button.

  • Prepare an iOpener and lay it over the lower edge of the front panel to soften the adhesive on the home button gasket.

In lieu of an iopener I used a plastic bag of dry malt-o-meal. Rice or a similar dry grain works too. Heat for 20-30 seconds until it's hot to the touch but not hot enough to burn the neck and you're good. :)

maverick798 - Reply

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Flip the front panel over and use a plastic opening pick to carefully separate the home button gasket from the front panel.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Gently press up on the home button from the front side of the display assembly to continue separating the button gasket from the front panel.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Use the pointed tip of a spudger to pry the home button flex cable off the back of the display panel.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Remove the home button assembly.

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Image 1/1:
  • Only the front panel remains.

Thank you for a thorough and complete guide. The different views of each step helped tremendously. My daughter appreciates it as well, because that means I didn't have to deprive her of her phone for too long.!

Todd Chafin - Reply

Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

162 other people completed this guide.

Jeff Suovanen

Member since: 08/06/2013

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Muito bom. Já aprendi muito consultando os tutoriais da IFIXIT. Parabéns.

Eder Macario - Reply

Solution worked very well - a couple of comments: 1. With a cracked screen the suction cup doesn't hold very well, I was nevertheless able to get the screen corner off with some heavy prying above the headphone jack as suggested in step 4. 2. In the replacement part I received, the order of the digitizer and camera cables was reversed, I had to tuck the digitizer cable back under the camera cable to get them down in the correct order. Great pictures and guide from ifixit.

stread777 - Reply

Agree with both points. The guide is also missing steps (or mention of) moving the camera/sensor/etc to the new digitizer. I didn't think about it until I wondered why the old screen had 3 cables and the new one only had 2.

nerdatheart -

Thanks for the tip, I had the same issue with the suction cup not working on the cracked screen. Applying clear packaging tape over the screen helped but it still didn't come apart. Ended up using a blow dryer on the highest setting to help melt the adhesive around the bottom of the phone (being careful to not let it heat up too long) which eventually made it possible to wedge the spudge inside.

The guide and photos were great along with the replacement part from iFixit. Probably the easiest screen replacement I've done so far.

gotchay -

I jus replaced the display of my iPhone everything works correctly except for the light sensor, the auto brightness setting is now useless, everything else (camera, speaker, and such) works just fine. Any ideas why?

Enrique Gutierrez - Reply

You may have not properly seated the proximity sensor, check to assure all plastic label stickers have been removed from the from and that it is properly seated. If it is damaged you will have to purchase a new flex.

Alec -

Stread777 I found that using a wide clear packaging tape adhered to the display that is larger that the suction cup allows you to maintain suction and pull the display up to insert splunger.

I also had to reroute cables

stolz9708 - Reply

excellent guide 10/10

Margaret King - Reply

If your display assembly came with it's own "new" home button installed and the target broken phone has NEVER used the fingerprint function...can you use the one on the new assembly without iOS complaining?

William Turner - Reply

I really liked this guide but what i did not like was that it did not show how to remove the metal part from the screen, nor the speaker and camera. If possible please add this! Otherwise great guide as usual on ifixit!

Johan Andersson - Reply

You skipped the introduction, didn't you? :) The guide you want is right here.

Jeff Suovanen -

I have order several different iPhone 6S screens from my supplier. When testing the screens I noticed without any other components plugged in (proximity sensor) just the screen I can use touch unless I cover the ear speaker area. The display doesn't dim which I wouldn't expect it to without the proximity sensor plugged in. But, is this a bad screen or a sensor of some kind in the actual screen cabling that senses light without proximity sensor?

Brady Davidson - Reply

I have noticed with some cheaper 6S screens that the proximity sensor will not work. If that is the case for you make sure that you scratch off the black film that is on the glass where the proximity sensor is suppose to go. It is not the prettiest thing but it is functional!

Gadget Tech - PDX - Reply

I've disconnected the 3 seperate pins (display data, digitizer and camera flex) why when i search for a screen on say amazon or ebay do the replacements only have 2??

A Fearn - Reply

The third connector is for the front-facing camera flex/sensor assembly. A lot of screens are sold without it, so you have to transfer that part over from your old display before you reassemble everything. At the top of this guide, you'll find a link to a longer/alternate guide for transferring components over to a bare-bones replacement screen. If you prefer to save yourself the hassle, just stick with the guide you're seeing here and use the pre-assembled part linked at the top.

Jeff Suovanen -

Thank you for another excellent guide!

Christa - Reply

https://www.injuredgadgets.com/LCD_Scree...

The way the cables look on this one i'm guessing is correct, could someone please tell me if this is the right fit for Verizon iPhone 6s please or send me a link to the one i need to get!!!!

Bailey Duncan - Reply

That's an iPhone 6 display, as opposed to a 6s. They are not compatible. The correct part for the 6s is linked at the top of this guide.

Jeff Suovanen -

I replaced a screen and there's a "ghost touch" issue. Did I do something wrong or is it a defective display?

John Cavaliere - Reply

It could be the part itself is defective or you bent a ribbon cable while putting it together. I had a similar issue once. The LCD worked perfectly fine when I tested it before I popped the screen back on. When I popped the screen in it didn't work, when I popped the screen back out with the cables still connected it worked. I returned the screen and swapped it out with a new one and it worked fine.

TLDR: it's probably the replacement screen itself.

John Cavaliere -

I don't understand , i have different displays , different producer and in my 3 different iPhone 6S the same problem.

WAPIK -

Hi I jus replaced mine. Any idea why my cameras don't work

Front or back

Tashan O'Neal - Reply

WARNING!: You should NOT reconnect your battery FPC cable / connector until the VERY LAST reassembly step! Modify your reassembly procedure to move this "re-connection" of the battery connector until very last. I can't stress this enough. My logic board is now burned (it smoked upon reconnecting the LCD replacement part, because the battery was already reconnected and "live". The problem is that if you don't have the FPC connector aligned just perfect to the header (on the logic board), you create a momentary short (when the pins aren't aligned well)... this causes the Logic board to instantly burn. Save yourself trouble.

###You have been warned###

enoughstatic - Reply

Sorry to hear you had such a bad outcome. The guide directs you to disconnect the battery first and reconnect it last, which is the correct procedure (and just good practice for electronics repair in general). There is no danger if the steps are followed in order. I don't know if it's any consolation, but at this point you most likely have a blown backlight circuit, which is a straightforward fix for a good microsoldering expert. There are several that frequent our Answers forum, so you may want to reach out to one of them to see about restoring your phone to working order. Good luck!

Jeff Suovanen -

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