Introduction

Power draining too quickly? Battery alarmingly swollen? Just won't hold a charge like it used to? Use this guide to replace the battery in your iPhone 5c.

This guide instructs you to remove the front panel assembly, this is intended to prevent damage to the display cables. If you feel comfortable supporting the display carefully while peeling the battery out of the body, skip the display removal and go to the battery removal steps.

For optimal performance, calibrate your newly installed battery: Drain battery below 10%, then charge uninterrupted to 100%.

Video Overview

Image 1/3: Lay overlapping strips of clear packing tape over the iPhone's display until the whole face is covered. Image 2/3: This will keep glass shards contained and provide structural integrity when prying and lifting the display. Image 3/3: Wear safety glasses to protect your eyes from any glass shaken free during the repair.
  • If your display glass is cracked, keep further breakage contained and prevent bodily harm during your repair by taping the glass.

  • Lay overlapping strips of clear packing tape over the iPhone's display until the whole face is covered.

    • This will keep glass shards contained and provide structural integrity when prying and lifting the display.

  • Wear safety glasses to protect your eyes from any glass shaken free during the repair.

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Image 1/1: Power off your iPhone before beginning disassembly.
  • Before you proceed, discharge your iPhone battery below 25%. A charged lithium-ion battery can catch fire and/or explode if accidentally punctured.

  • Power off your iPhone before beginning disassembly.

  • Remove the two 3.8 mm P2 Pentalobe screws on either side of the Lightning connector.

to keep screws in order, buy some double sided tape and then affix the tape in small pieces to a sheet of paper. As you take the screws out, you can affix them to the tape (which is on the paper) and then write a description of what they are and where they go. quick, cheap and easy.

V. Jones - Reply

  • The next two steps demonstrate using the iSclack, a great tool for safely opening the iPhone 5c that we recommend for anyone doing more than one repair on an iPhone 5, 5s, or 5c. If you aren't using the iSclack, skip to Step 5.

  • Close the handle on the iSclack, opening the suction-cup jaws.

  • Place the bottom of your iPhone in between the suction cups, against the plastic depth gauge.

    • The top suction cup should rest just above the home button.

  • Open the handles to close the jaws of the iSclack. Center the suction cups and press them firmly onto the top and bottom of the iPhone.

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Image 1/2: The iSclack is designed to safely open your iPhone just enough to separate the pieces, but not enough to damage any cables. Image 2/2: Peel the two suction cups off your iPhone.
  • Hold onto your iPhone securely and close the handle of the iSclack to separate the suction cups, pulling the front panel up from the rear case.

  • The iSclack is designed to safely open your iPhone just enough to separate the pieces, but not enough to damage any cables.

  • Peel the two suction cups off your iPhone.

  • Skip the next three steps and continue on to Step 8.

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Image 1/1: Be sure the cup is completely on the screen to get a tight seal.
  • Press a suction cup onto the screen, just above the home button.

  • Be sure the cup is completely on the screen to get a tight seal.

cool i diden't now

Ben Lewis Murray Dyne - Reply

Image 1/2: While holding the iPhone down with one hand, pull up on the suction cup to slightly separate the front panel assembly from the rear case. Image 2/2: Take your time and apply firm, constant force. The display assembly is a much tighter fit than most devices.
  • Make sure the suction cup is firmly attached to the front panel assembly.

  • While holding the iPhone down with one hand, pull up on the suction cup to slightly separate the front panel assembly from the rear case.

  • Take your time and apply firm, constant force. The display assembly is a much tighter fit than most devices.

  • With a plastic opening tool, begin to gently pry the rear case down, away from the display assembly, while you pull up with the suction cup.

  • There are several clips attaching the front panel assembly to the rear case, so you may need to use a combination of the suction cup and plastic opening tool to free the front panel assembly.

Cover a badly cracked screen with a strip of packing tape first to get a better seal for your suction cup. If it's a super crappy suction cup, moistening it a bit will help as well.

Dan - Reply

Great Idea! I have been doing this for awhile and have never thought to share!

duston -

Image 1/1: Remove the suction cup from the display assembly.
  • Pull the plastic nub to release the vacuum seal on the suction cup.

  • Remove the suction cup from the display assembly.

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Image 1/2: Open the display to about a 90º angle, and lean it against something to keep it propped up while you're working on the phone. Image 2/2: In a pinch, you can use an unopened canned beverage to hold the display.
  • Lift the home button end of the front panel up to gain access to the connectors near the top of the phone.

  • Open the display to about a 90º angle, and lean it against something to keep it propped up while you're working on the phone.

    • In a pinch, you can use an unopened canned beverage to hold the display.

  • Add a rubber band to keep the display securely in place while you work. This prevents undue strain on the display cables.

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Image 1/1:
  • Remove the two 1.6 mm Phillips #000 screws securing the metal battery connector bracket to the logic board.

These screws are very tiny and hard to manipulate. The screwdriver is magnetic; which is great to take them out, but makes it hard to put the screws back in, as the screwdriver pulls them from the hole. I solved this problem by using the pointed end of the spudger to put a tiny drop of Elmer's glue in the hole and then insert the screw. You can do this before putting the bracket in place if you want. Then the screw wont pull out by the magnetic driver and make lining up and fastening the screws much easier; at least for me!

Joe Shirghio - Reply

I found that you don't need to disconnect the battery... why bother doing more fiddling with annoyingly tiny screws and obstinate cable connectors when you don't actually have to? Especially when you could only end up causing more damage. As a matter of fact, the original iFixit video didn't bother to disconnect the battery either, but they've since updated the video to include battery disconnection, I guess as a "belt and braces" approach in case the repair-hero forgets to power down the phone first?

Michael Allen - Reply

Disconnecting the battery is a safety precaution, and yes it's worth doing. Even with the phone powered off, there is some danger of blowing the backlight filter fuse if you disconnect the display while the battery is connected. At that point you're no longer looking at a simple DIY repair. Even though it's possible to skip this step and still come out okay, my advice is not to risk it.

Jeff Suovanen -

Image 1/1:
  • Remove the metal battery connector bracket from the iPhone.

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Image 1/1:
  • Use the flat edge of a spudger to pry the battery connector up off the logic board.

Why do we need to disconnect the battery?

Maria Raesch - Reply

Sorry, I missed the comments on step 9 that detail the procedure.

Maria Raesch - Reply

Image 1/1: Two 1.3 mm screws
  • Remove the following Phillips #000 screws securing the front panel assembly cable bracket to the logic board:

    • Two 1.3 mm screws

    • One 1.7 mm screw

    • One 3.25 mm screw

  • It is especially important to keep track of your screws in this step for reassembly. Accidentally using the 3.25 mm screw or the 1.7 mm screw in the bottom right hole will result in significant damage to the logic board causing the phone to no longer boot properly.

  • Be careful not to over-tighten the screws. If they don't fit easily when you are securing them, they may be the wrong size, don't force them.

In step 9: I think you are talking about the 3,25 and 1,7mm one not the 1,3 and the 1,7mm?

Siegbert Waldner - Reply

DO NOT Remove the battery, there is no need to and can cause unnecessary damage! There's a tutorial on YouTube that does it without!

Alister Malcolm - Reply

I didn't need to remove the front panel to replace the lightning connector. Just prop it up like in Step 8, then skip steps 12-16.

jacobstevens - Reply

I always put my screws in a magnet tray and place the screws in the exact position they were taken out. The magnet tray holds the screws tight in the position I put them in. No chasing on the floor looking for small screws that you brushed off the table.

Fredrick Apel - Reply

I always take a picture of the phone, print it out, then use scotch tape to tape the screws onto the picture in the location where they go. You don't lose the screws and you always know where they go for re-assembly

K Jansen - Reply

When reassembling, the screw holder that the screws screw into came off the board. Is there a way to superglue that back in?

Chandler Perez - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Remove the front panel assembly cable bracket from the logic board.

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Image 1/2: Be sure to '''only''' pry up on the connector, and not on the socket on the logic board. Image 2/2: Be sure to '''only''' pry up on the connector, and not on the socket on the logic board.
  • Use a plastic opening tool to disconnect the front-facing camera and sensor cable connector.

  • Be sure to only pry up on the connector, and not on the socket on the logic board.

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Image 1/3: The LCD and Digitizer connectors are on the same cable assembly, so prying the LCD connector up should disconnect both connectors. Double check that the two cables are fully disconnected before removing the display. Image 2/3: When reassembling your phone, the LCD cable may pop off its connector. A blank screen, or white lines on the display could be caused by a loose connection. Should this happen, reconnect the cable and power cycle your phone. The best way to power cycle your phone is to disconnect and reconnect the battery. Image 3/3: When reassembling your phone, the LCD cable may pop off its connector. A blank screen, or white lines on the display could be caused by a loose connection. Should this happen, reconnect the cable and power cycle your phone. The best way to power cycle your phone is to disconnect and reconnect the battery.
  • Use a plastic opening tool to disconnect the LCD cable connector.

    • The LCD and Digitizer connectors are on the same cable assembly, so prying the LCD connector up should disconnect both connectors. Double check that the two cables are fully disconnected before removing the display.

  • When reassembling your phone, the LCD cable may pop off its connector. A blank screen, or white lines on the display could be caused by a loose connection. Should this happen, reconnect the cable and power cycle your phone. The best way to power cycle your phone is to disconnect and reconnect the battery.

I replaced the broken front panel of the iPhone 5c and got the "famous white stripes" on the new screen. Reading about all kind of problems that the lcd/digitizer cable contacts may cause, I compared the cable connectors of the original Apple and the replacement part I bought online with a 35x magnifying glass. The quality difference was visible: The white description on the original part on the cable next to the connector is: 821-1784-A, while the inferior replacement part is: 821-1784-02. Check out the two numbers online and insist getting the "A" to avoid future troubles !!!

Harold Wallner - Reply

This person above is not knowledgeable. That number is a camera proxy part number, not the lcd or digitizer number. It changes with production date, both for original and aftermarket ones. A, B, D, 02, 04, 08 etc. Can all be either or.

vince -

Apple uses numerical revisions (-02) for pre-production parts, and alpha revisions (-A) for production revisions. It looks like you got a preproduction assembly, or a knock-off.

terrymccallum -

There are, in fact, three connectors in this step, not two. The front-facing camera and digitizer connector (Step 11) is really difficult to align when you put it back. Took me about 15 minutes before I succeeded.

Now I have a different problem. Everything works just dandy, EXCEPT:

Towards the bottom of the screen (in portrait) there is a horizontal line that is dead to the touch. For example, on the keyboard, I can use the spacebar, but not C V B N M, etcetera.

Three possibilities in my mind: One, when I dropped it, something else besides the glass and digitizer, etc, was damaged.

Two: I did not replace the cables correctly. This seems unlikely. They all "clicked" into place and stayed there.

Three: The digitizer supplied is faulty.

Comments? Which cable/connector could be causing this -- if it is that?

piet - Reply

Take apart, Clean Connections, Put back together.... If same problem sounds like a fault part...

duston -

When reassembling the iPhone 5c, I used the flat end of the spudger to press on the connectors and maintain them while replacing the front panel on the body of the iPhone.

The third and "deepest" connector no longer slips out of its socket, which it did before holding the whole lot with the spudger.

jimbbo - Reply

If the ESD plate covering the connectors is properly re-attached to the phone, you should not have to do this. The cover holds all the connectors in place just fine.

iBroke -

Image 1/1:
  • Remove the front panel assembly from the rear case.

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Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • Run the tip of a spudger between the battery and the headphone jack to unfold the battery adhesive tab.

I didn't need to remove the battery to replace the lightning connector assembly. Skip past steps 17 through 25.

jacobstevens - Reply

the adhesive tab is actually folded back upon itself. Gentle agitation on what appears to be the edge will in fact show you that it is flexible and can be "unfolded". When unfolded, it will allow you to see what they are talking about. GENTLE is the operative word !

V. Jones - Reply

I also didn't need to remove the battery to replace the lightening cable. I'd say skip it unless you have big fingers, because it is a tight space.

Benjamin Browning - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Pull the battery adhesive tab away from the phone.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Cut the black battery adhesive tab between the two white adhesive strips, separating them.

Pulling upwards with a gentle tug on the now exposed black end of the adhesive tab will reveal a white film (look at the end of the tweezers). This white/black interface will have a small cutout already in the middle. Cut the adhesive tab using this as a midpoint guide.

V. Jones - Reply

Image 1/2: Slowly pull one of the battery adhesive strips away from the battery, toward the bottom of the iPhone. Image 2/2: Pull steadily, maintaining constant tension on the strip as it slips out from between the battery and the rear case. For best results, pull the strip at a 60º angle or less.
  • Try to keep the strips flat and unwrinkled during this procedure; wrinkled strips will stick together and break instead of pulling out cleanly.

  • Slowly pull one of the battery adhesive strips away from the battery, toward the bottom of the iPhone.

  • Pull steadily, maintaining constant tension on the strip as it slips out from between the battery and the rear case. For best results, pull the strip at a 60º angle or less.

  • Guide the strip carefully around the corner and up the side of the battery. Be careful not to snag it on any of the other internal iPhone components.

  • The strip will stretch to many times its original length. Continue pulling, re-grabbing the strip near the battery if necessary, until the entire strip comes free.

I pulled the first tab straight up and it snapped. I tried to see if I could pry the battery out but couldn't without bending the battery. So I left the battery in and was able to complete this without removing it. However, I'm pretty sure I damaged the battery. Waiting on the replacement battery now to confirm. Long story short, leave the battery in for this fix!

lew - Reply

When I tried to remove the adhesive, it snapped on both sides. Even though I was careful not to bend or twist. But now the battery is still stuck in place. What do I do now?

lynn - Reply

Keep reading; there are some additional steps you can take toward the end of the guide. The battery is much easier to remove if you keep the pull tabs intact, but they can be tricky.

Jeff Suovanen -

My tabs broke. I had to pry the battery out. Took my time and it came out okay. The adhesive residue was a pain to remove though.

mwtort - Reply

My tabs broke as well, quite close to the battery's lower corners. Then I discovered a reasonably hot surface to place the phone - my quite old Apple Airport Extreme. I warmed the phone for a couple of 3 minute sessions, that didn't loosen the glue but made it more malleable. Then proceeded to carefully pull the tab on the logic board's side with tweezers, which was a success. After that I could get an old ID card under the battery and push the other tab into itself. That done, the glue basically gave out and the battery was free.

So my advice would be to use some sort of heat before pulling on the tabs, which will make them a bit easier to work with. It does take some time but result counts, right?

jukkaharkonen - Reply

This is the most awful thing: removing the battery. The adhesive holds sooo strong. I ripped it off very soon. So i heated the back of the iPhone with a hair dryer up and opened the battery with scissors. Then i could draw the battery off.

5c is much better to repair then my last repaired iPhone. A 3gs :-)

Tanx ifixit. You are the best.

Achim Graether - Reply

I don't thnk we need Steps 9 to 12 to remove the battery

Leave the display attached is you only need to replace the battery !!!

lmusolino -

@lmusolino of course you can skip those steps (9-12) but it's risky for those digitizer to be damaged if you are careless while removing the battery.

John Mark Booc -

This was more tricky than I thought. I bent the original battery quite hard to get it of, while blowing the phone with a hair dryer. I fixed two 5c's for my kids and I ordered one kit and a extra battery. I didn't understand when ordering that just one pair of adhesive strips came along, with the kit. I partial them using one strip each on the phones. Hope that it will work. Everything seems to work with the phones.

Peter Rousu - Reply

Don't pull too hard or it will break just gently apply presaure

Shsjsjakkaka - Reply

If u do break the tabs the lift the top end of th battery and get them from that end

Shsjsjakkaka - Reply

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Repeat to remove the second strip.

I was able to remove the first strip as the guide discusses in Step#20. When I attempted to peel the second strip, as in Step #21 above, it broke. This left the adhesive strip on half of the battery and I was unable to grip anything. I got some dental floss and threaded it underneath the already free side. I then used a slight back and forth motion to loosen the grip of the other half of the strip enough that I could "GENTLY" pry the free side of the battery up. Taking extreme care not to pry against any components of the phone. I then gently pried the battery up a little at a time along with using a sawing motion on the dental floss to eventually free the battery from the underlying adhesive strip. Takes patience and persistence. GENTLY being the operative word.

V. Jones - Reply

Image 1/1: If one, or both, of the adhesive strips tears, and you are unable to retrieve it with a set of tweezers, '''do not pry''' the battery out of the phone. Continue on to the next steps to safely remove your battery.
  • Remove the battery from your iPhone.

  • If one, or both, of the adhesive strips tears, and you are unable to retrieve it with a set of tweezers, do not pry the battery out of the phone. Continue on to the next steps to safely remove your battery.

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Image 1/1: Be careful when handling the bag, as it will be quite hot.
  • Follow our iOpener heating instructions to safely warm the adhesive securing your battery to the rear case.

  • Be careful when handling the bag, as it will be quite hot.

  • Lay the iOpener flat on the backside of the iPhone to the right of the camera. Smooth it out so that there is good contact between the back of the iPhone and the iOpener.

  • Let the bag sit on the iPhone for approximately 90 seconds before attempting to remove the battery.

you can substitute a 'bed buddy' or similar microwave activated heating pack here for the iOpener. i eventually wound up working on-top-of the heading pad as at softened the adhesive. take your time and let the heat work

Pritchett Harris - Reply

Image 1/2: Do not pry against the logic board or you may damage the phone. Image 2/2: Avoid prying near the top edge of the battery, or you may damage the [https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iPhone+5c+Upper+Component+Cable+Replacement/23004#s60463|upper component ribbon cable|new_window=true].
  • Carefully wedge a plastic card under the battery on the side nearest the logic board.

    • Do not pry against the logic board or you may damage the phone.

    • Avoid prying near the top edge of the battery, or you may damage the upper component ribbon cable.

  • Slide the card from the top of the battery to the bottom, pushing toward the edge of the case.

  • If necessary, repeat the same procedure with the case side of the battery.

A picture of the position of the upper ribbon cable would be useful here. I have falsely thought that you only have to be careful around the top edge of the battery that is near the logic board, and have managed to cut the upper component cable with the plastic card.. :(

Daniel Boros - Reply

The third bullet of this step has a link to two photos of the cable.

Jeff Suovanen -

Image 1/1: There should be no resistance. If the battery remains stuck, reheat the iOpener and pry again.
  • Lift and remove the battery from the iPhone.

  • There should be no resistance. If the battery remains stuck, reheat the iOpener and pry again.

  • When installing the battery, refer to this guide to replace your battery's adhesive strips.

  • Perform a hard reset after reassembly. This can prevent several issues and simplify troubleshooting.

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Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order. For optimal performance, calibrate your newly installed battery: Drain battery below 10%, then charge uninterrupted to 100%.

267 other people completed this guide.

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23 Comments

I am disappointed with the guide - not up to iFixit's usual standards. I got the iPhone open and the battery out just fine, but there were *three* missing hints that would have cut a half-hour from my re-assembly:

1) The connector cover has three short screws and one long one. The video doesn't show which is the long one, so I had to farble around to get the screws back. (The long one is the top-right one, near the hinge on the right side of the phone)

2) There are no hints on the video or in the box about putting the adhesive strips back in. I was trying to get the tab to fold over, but got all wrapped up in the strips. It took a lot of time to fix it, and I still don't know if it's important to fold the tab over or not.

3) There is no information about whether to retain the clear cellophane wrapper that comes on the battery. I took it off - hope that's right.

That said, all the tools were included in the kit, they work as advertised. And the phone's back together, and we'll see how it works...

richbhanover - Reply

In reference to your #1 point, this is very good example of why a SCREW-MAT or iCracked Part Chart come in very handy!

Especially in repairs like the 5s ... some screws look the same, but are .01" different ... enough to scratch/break the trace underneath on the logic board .... adding another $100 (and a week travel time by mail, if you cannot do the repair yourself), to your repair - to have it micro-soldered.

With Screw-Mats or iCracked Part Charts, every screw is placed on it's corresponding marker, so you know exactly which screw is which.

If you are in a pinch, and do not have a Screw Mat, you can draw little diagrams on a piece of paper or a dry erase surface, and mark out where each and every screw goes, as sometimes there is that .01" difference in screw sizes, that can really screw up (no pun intended) your repair.

Cheers!

iBroke -

They did mention the screw size in the guide here by color coding the MM. I agree with point two, but that's nitpicking. Lastly (the reason I commented), you did it right. The plastic should be removed so it is just like the orig battery, if you would leave the cellophane on, the adhesive would be stuck to it instead of the battery and making for a poorly secured battery.

Overall, the parts and kit were good, but this phone is not my favorite iPhone to work on. Getting that old battery out was extremely annoying compared to the 4, 4s, 5, and 5s that I've all done in the past.

On a side note, this is the first ifixit branded battery I've received and I've ordered a lot of parts from them over the years. They used to source what looked line 100% orig batteries. I avoid non original batteries like the plague, I don't care if it's a phone, laptop, or even my APC UPS devices. Ifixit has earned my trust over the years with all the parts and tools so I went ahead and installed it, I'm sure it's good.

trssho91 - Reply

okay so i flowed every step the right way and everything... but now my phones not turning on at all or charging or anything... im high !#^&@@ right... i need this thing for work and to make sure my kids are okay....

DaeTroy - Reply

Hi,

I have a problem with the battery ever since I installed the battery in my iPhone 5c, the volume buttons are jammed. I think I moved the battery too close to the button and it may have jammed it, I want to take the battery out and place it back, but it is too sticky and is stuck, what should I do?

Kingsley Choi - Reply

Hello, is there any chance I have damaged the battery when removed? I folded it when removed for replacement of the rear box. After that the device does not turn on.

leocardosoex - Reply

The pictures on removing the battery adhesive strips are not very accurate, i have (sadly only later) found pictures on another guide that show how the adhesive strips need to be pulled past the SIDES of the battery. my careful attempt to follow your instructions here resulted in ripping both adhesives. so i did the plastic card thing which you suggest in step 24, AND THERE IS DEFINITELY A CAUTION NOTICE MISSING!! i had no idea that under the top of the battery was the upper component flex cable, which i then irreperably damaged with the card. now i had to order that one too and have to removely almost the whole phone from its casing to replace that cable... PLEASE put a caution notice in at step 24 to warn other users not to go too high up from the side of the battery in order to not damage the upper component cable. thanks

David - Reply

In steps 20-21, could you add another image to illustrate what you say about removing the two adhesive strips...how far to guide the strips around the corner and up the side of the battery?

Deborah Marks - Reply

My home button no longer works after following this guide, any help is appreciated

Chris - Reply

And the phone doesn't seem to be charging but says it is

Chris -

I found the same problem, the home button stopped to work. The problem is related to the connectors of the home button, there are two on the left side of the button behind the touch screen and two on the base of the iPhone. When you close the iPhone, after the replacement of the battery, the connector is so delicate that it broken! Maybe is very low quality (!) (I'm very disappointed with Apple!).

Since I don't find the name of this flex cable (it's not the home button but the opposite one where you plug it) to buy it, I found a workaround that consists in to weld 2 wires in order to close the circuit when pressing the home button. Very bad solution but it works!!!

Marco -

I have the same problem as Chris here: my iPhone 5c does not charge, nor does the home button work. Any constructive solutions or tips to try out? I followed instructions to the letter. The phone turns out and other functions seem to be working just fine.

Cheers!

-Sydney

Antti T - Reply

help, one side of adhesive broke, remains stuck. I will try heating with a therapeutic heat-or-cool-bag. Not practical to send off for i-opener.

John Lozier - Reply

A hair dryer will also work. You just need to get the adhesive good and hot to help soften it up. Flip the phone over and heat it from the back.

Jeff Suovanen -

Only problem I had was with my own clumsiness. Pinched the big screw too hard and it bounced off my chest and dropped to the floor. The adhesive strips were a pain, but after opening up my iPad, I knew what I was in for.

jhurter - Reply

Mr. Galan... Well done... the process for Battery Replacement of the iPhone 5c were straightforward and well documented. I was able to complete the replacement without issue. Much appreciated.

plisi - Reply

if I pierced my OEM battery (while still connected) while replacing it for a new aftermarket one cause a short circuit and cause the phone to be trash it wont turn on now with the new battery installed.

Isaac - Reply

Now it turned on but has a solid white screen

Isaac -

I was able to succeed in installing my battery following the guide. I have place a few comments on my experience in the steps above. Most notably, my second piece of adhesive strip broke and I had to revert to using some dental floss in order to get my battery removed. Gentle persuasion and persistence is the key... Have to be gentle when attempting to pry the battery up and not use the edge of the remaining components as leverage points. I would definitely rate this as moderate. Attempting to push the connectors back on during the reassembly steps was daunting. Everything is so small and you have to rely more on feel than site. Be methodical and gently push the connectors down. If they don't click or snap then you are not aligned correctly and you simply need to try again.

V. Jones - Reply

Seems like success. I bought the kit but I broke one of the battery strips, did not have the iopener so I used a container with hot water inside to warm instead of that. Still had to lose a lot of time with the removal of the battery. Secondly, I assembled the display wrongly two times before succeeding - very small structures and one of them was constantly badly connected. Had to reset the device two times before everything was into place. All the buttons work. The battery charges and I have calibrated it. This was the first time I ever fixed anything. Very neat packaging, with extra screws and a pack of gummy bears lol.

mariana.m93 - Reply

Followed this guide to replace battery due to water damage on my iPhone 5C. Both adhesive strips broke and I used heat pad to first heat up phone from backside and used a plastic card to remove battery. You need to be very careful while removing battery as any extra pressure will damage other parts. The difficult part was to put back the screws of connectors bracket. Screws are so tiny that aligning them just using screw driver is tough. Use tweezers to correctly place the screw and tighten using screw driver. All functions seem to be working fine. Thanks for well documented instructions.

HARISH ACHAPPA - Reply

I watched the video and then followed the guide step by step and thankfully I made it from beginning to end with virtually no mishaps. The worst part by far is the adhesive strips because the first side broke when nearly complete but the second half broke right at the top. I ended up having to use a "bed buddy" heating sock (all I had in a pinch since I didn't have your heat removal kit) and I cut down a piece of flexible cheap cutting mat that can be found at a place like IKEA to make my removal tool. With care and patience it worked. Without the instructions though I would have been totally stuck and had to take it to some kiosk repair shop to get it fixed for the $60 I was trying to save. Last Apple phone I ever buy, but not the last time I utilize ifixit.com. Thanks.

Jared Jester - Reply

One more thing...I appreciate that you utilize all paper packaging with your kits instead of a paper box with plastic tray.

Jared Jester - Reply

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