Can I insert 16Gb RAM into MacBook Pro early 2011?

Apple says that I can upgrade my RAM from 4GB to 8GB (2x4GB RAMs). Is it possible to install 2x8GB DDR3 SoDIMM 1333MHz cards into my Mac?

I went ahead and installed 16GB RAM ram in my Macbook. It works fine, except for when I try to run Windows 7 Pro in bootcamp. It comes to the login screen then it stops. sometimes it just comes to a white screen. I think win pro7 can handle 192 GB REM, so what's the problem? Can it be the memory model ? I bought Crucial DDR3 16GB 1333MHz SODIMM for Mac.

Thanks!

Answered! View the answer I have this problem too

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Sorry to be digging up old posts, but i am wanting to upgrade my mbp to 16 gb and want to know if all the ram will be recognised.

I have searched the web to the ammoumt i am capable of and can find a clear answer anwhere .

Thanks

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Hey guys, I have an early 2011 15 inch Macbook pro and I've upgraded it to 8Gb ram (2x4Gb RAM's). Apple says "4GB (two 2GB SO-DIMMs) of 1333MHz DDR3 memory; two SO-DIMM slots support up to 8GB" from this link:

http://support.apple.com/kb/sp620

Is it possible to upgrade from 8 to 16Gb?

I know this post has been answered and have said 'yes we can upgrade to 16gb', not so in those words but you get it. I just wanted to make sure.

Thanks.

Arjun

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Arjun - For future reference you posted a Question in the place where only Answers belong. Please use the add comment link to the appropriate Answer or Start your O.Q.. All 011 models can run 16GB RAM it is not supported buy Apple, but, it works.

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Hey I added 16 gigs to my early 2011 MacBook Pro and did it ever-increasing performance. It was a slug till I changed over the ram.

I'm sure you can get a lot of extra speed with a SSD but why spend the money when you can improve the speed for fraction of the cost. Every time that I upgrade the OS the system seemed to slow down. It was placing so much into high memory on the ram that my machine was almost useless. Now the speed is right where I like it to be and I don't have any problems with it all. Even the old problem of it searching the Wi-Fi every five seconds really is not problem. I bought the memory on Amazon and it was cheap and you can check on YouTube for instructions on how to replace it in your machine.

My MacBook Pro and my iMac both have 16 gigs and the old iMac is a I5 and the MacBook Pro is a I7.

Try the memory first it's cheap and then decide whether you want a SSD. You may discover that the SSD is not needed.

Good luck and happy repairs

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I also added 16 ram to my early 2011 MacBook Pro and a 500 SSD drive.. $300 for everything.. Brand new computer.. Very easy to do it yourself also.. tons of videos on You Tube.. Highly recommend doing both...

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Yes.

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Confirmed, currently Mac: Mac book pro 15inch early 2011

4gb dfr3 1067 MHz 204 pin ; yes I have too upgraded to 16Gb of ram in this MacBook. Self installed the ram. Note to users, make sure you discharge the compactors prior to attempting this with a Mac reset on the computer and ground your self and use anti static protection as to not damage the computer. Make sure the memory is fully seated. Power up the computer and boot to your home page and check memory to verify after install by going to about this Mac to see the new installed ram number.

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Will it work?

Yes.

Is it a total waste if you still have a spinning hard drive?

ABSOLUTELY!

Get an SSD, then RAM. I would rather have an SSD and 2 GB of RAM than a hard drive and 20 GB of RAM. As long as a computer is still using a hard drive, it is broken, as far as I am concerned, and miserably unusable.

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I don't understand your comment. My MacBook Pro 2011 hard drive is built in. How would I not use my hard drive?

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I think the reference is that if you're still using a "platter-type" hard disk drive (HDD), then it's worthless.. But I think that's a crap explanation. An SSD hard drive will perform much faster than a platter-type HDD. Think of it as a calculator vs a pencil, when doing math. A calculator is much faster, as it's all digital/electronic. A pencil, like a standard platter-type HDD is much slower (by comparison) to the calculator as it is a "mechanically-read" device.

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A HDD is not useless, but it's true that an SSD is easily the most effective upgrade for any computer that doesn't have one yet. In a Macbook, you can still keep the HDD for slower large scale storage if you sacrifice the optical drive. I went with optical drive + SSD, but I'm constantly running out of disk space, partially because I hope too much swap that OS X doesn't seem to clean up. I'm hoping the extra RAM will solve that, bringing this question full circle.

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Yes it's possible. Only be careful with the brands. Not all brands will work perfectly. I had some cheapo's working perfectly and had some not working at all.

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Hello MIlan. Can you tell the brands that worked and the brands that did not work? THX

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I have a early 2011 macbook pro 15" 2.0Ghz and I installed 2 8GB Corsair modules and it recognizes and works.

But I have not, at all, noticed any improvement in the performance :-(

I think If you upgrade to 8GB will do the trick..

In a few machines it just won't use all of it. I don't know, maybe it did and I haven't noticed.

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Putting 16GB of RAM in a computer is not like dropping a 600HP Hemi in a car… It's more like adding a towing package to a car, truck or SUV… if you're already pulling a big load a tow package (e.g. more RAM) helps get the job done more efficiently. Does that make sense? If you were not using processor intensive applications (Applications used in content creation applications like PhotoShop, Illustrator, Final Cut Pro) before the switch, then no you'll not notice a change after. RAM determines how many applications and how much data the Mac can keep track of without having to read from or write to the storage medium (access VMEM which slows a process down). The speed of e-mail or web browsing… or playing music will not noticeably change after Maxing RAM. The machine is already running those Apps as fast a human can detect, and the App allow.. those uses simply don't benefit from having 16GB RAM.

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"If you were not using processor intensive applications " from originalmachead

I'm pretty sure he meant RAM intensive, not processor. Though they can be one in the same, they aren't necessarily. Opening a huge picture in photoshop can be RAM intensive; running a complex filter can be processor intensive. It may be helpful to have more RAM, but won't speed up a processor intensive task.

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So this is to originalmachead. I also have a MacBook Pro 2011, and since El Capitan it's been getting slower and slower. I don't usually use apps like Photoshop or InDesign...just Apple Mail, Google Chrome and Pages. So you're saying if I increase the RAM, it won't help the ever-slowing speed of the computer?

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@euchreyou - I would focus on doing some HD clean up first. Your system slowing down implies the drive is getting full and the files are fragmented. Run Disk Utility from an external bootable drive, then run Disk Doctor or some other cache & log cleaner. Then clean out as much junk you can. You want to have at least 1/4 of your drive free a smaller drive needs more (1/3). Once you have the free space run a good defragmenter app like: Drive Genus. Once your drive is whipped back into shape you should see a big improvement!

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As for the next step I would increase your RAM given the fact you are doing image editing. Most likely your drives problems was due to the fact your usage created many frag'ed files as it didn't have enough RAM to hold the image in RAM. I would also look at either swapping out the HD to a big SSD (1 or 2 TB) if you can afford it. or think about a SSHD. I wouldn't jump to a dual drive unless your system can support it (there is an issue in some models)

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For all of your wanting to upgrade to 16BG of RAM ... DON'T!

Why, not because the machine won't accept it, because it will and if you have a good brand it will work fine and recognize it, even though Apple has clearly stated that it 8Gb is the max.

However, most people believe that a slow computer is due to memory, which is a factor but upgrading to 16gigs is only going waste your money, 8GB is plenty unless you plan on running 5 virtual machines all at once, unlikely.

You might want to consider other factors like your graphics memory, in which you can upgrade because it is in the chipset, and harddrive speed. Sometime your graphic memory is overload, seeming how it is only 256MB compared to the 2.2GHz MacBook Pro (MC723LL/A) early 2011 version that has 1GB of graphics memory. Then you harddrive, it may be bombarded with so much data of music files and video files that it can't even find what your looking for in time.

Consider these before spending wasted money on Memory Upgrade. You really won't see a big different going to 16GB of RAM memory.

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Brian, I do agree with part of your statement '8GB is enough for most people'. I do take exception on your remark on Apple clearly stated 8GB is the limit. Apple's limit is based on day one of the models history not what memory modules came out later. While it's true Apple has not gone back to test the newer memory modules others have. In addition, some systems (Core2 Duo) do have a limit due to the CPU and the memory controller logic used in them. Systems that can address more memory (i3/i5/i7) and the most current OS-X can leverage it. The last piece here is the application: not all apps can use all of this memory (nor need it). Running different applications concurently can allow each running app all the memory each require. Having a single app having the ability to access all of this higher amount of RAM would need to be verified by that given app vendor. As an example CadCam can leverage this added RAM.

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VM's only confuses the issue here as the the memory limit of the VM's OS would need to be factored in and lastly, the number of VM's and why you are using VM's. Most people using a VM need to run Windows or UNIX/Linux to gain access to a given app and then the same story applies what is the limit of the OS & the app per that given VM. Then the CPU, storage (HD/SSD) and/or network performance becomes the performance limit. The GPU is only reflecting the systems ability to process. So a bogged down system will encounter issues independent of the amount of RAM it has. People fail to consider all of the pieces and the balance of each element that makes a computer. Which is the bottom line here and I do agree with you on that point as well.

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I down voted this answer because it is incorrect.

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I strongly recommend to replace the HD by SSD. You will see a lot of improvement in the boot time and the overall performance.

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Whether you will see the impact of a memory upgrade depends entirely on your usage. I'm not running any VMs, but I'm using 7.9 GB and my Mac creates way too many swap files. I think more memory would do me a lot of good. RAM is cheap.

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Yes you can. Also you can always check on Kingston's website. It lists what the max memory is by machine selection.

http://www.kingston.com/us/memory/search...

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16gigs of RAM is only good for 64bit systems, on 32Bit, there's about 8gigs of ram being used before the computer bogs down.

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It might shock you to hear that OS X 10.8 and above, and all the hardware capable of running 10.8 and above, is 64 bit. To the best of my knowledge, the only machines that will address more than 8GB of RAM that won't run 10.8 are the last-generation G5 towers and the first-generation Mac Pro towers.

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A 32 bit computer can't even address more than 4 GB. Even 8 GB is a waste in that case.

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I just added 16 gigs to my early 2011 MacBook Pro and when from slug to a race machine. It also improved the internet. If you upgrade look at the activity monitor and it actually uses over 10 gigs to operate.

I used consair Mac memory.

My machine slowed with each OS upgrade and I think it's Apples method to tell you need a new machine. I use a lap link cable to capture pictures from my camera Raw files and now it works great.

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If you had a 4GB system then you could have stopped at 8GB and seen the same result. The bigger win here is cleaning your drive of collected junk. One good tool is Disk Doctor you can download from the App Store. The next thing is to run Drive Utility from a another bootable drive and repair & fix the permissions. The last thing is defrag your HD as over time the files do get fragmented. If you can swing it get a SSHD or SSD to replace your slower HD. Combined with the 8 GB of RAM you'll have a screamer!

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yes.

there is no problem.

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I down voted this answer because you made it 9 months after macheads same answer. You contributed nothing. Also you and milan voting yourselves up for this is BS.

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I wanted to upvote this for mayer cursing, even if in acronym form, but could not find out how to upvote a comment. :(

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