Pro Tech Toolkit

$64.95 Was $100.00
You save $35.05!

Product code: IF145-072-1

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Pro Tech Toolkit

$64.95 Was $100.00
You save $35.05!

Product code: IF145-072-1

Product Overview

70 tools help you dish out sweet repair justice.

  • The industry standard for computer repair technicians and businesses.
  • Tools selected based on data from our thousands of free repair guides.
  • Will tear down all mainstream laptops, cellphones, and flux capacitors.

Kit Contents:

Product Details

  $64.95

 

Condition:

New

50+ Available

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Product Videos

 

Product Details

Personally or Professionally, this kit works where you do. ¶ 

The iFixit Pro Tech Toolkit has become the industry standard for electronics work, from garage hackers to government agency personnel. Contained in a sleek grey tool roll, the Pro Tech Toolkit will come with you wherever something needs to be repaired. Designed by the gadget fanatics that bring you awesome teardowns, the Pro Tech Toolkit will have you tearing down devices—broken or not—just to use the cool tools.

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Even if you don't have anything to fix yourself, you can still fix other people's things! Cell phone repair is a booming self-starting business. Students, stay-at-home parents, and entrepreneurs are all joining in to fix phones for their friends and locals, while making good profit for themselves. Apple sold 37 million iPhones in the 4-month holiday season of 2011, and while many of those phones get fixed every day, even more are simply thrown out. With the help of this tool kit, you could be making those phones run like new. By the time you’ve fixed five phones, this kit will have paid for itself!

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You don’t have to be a repair technician to find this kit useful. This kit is also great for anyone who has a phones, tablets, and laptops around the house. Our 54 bit toolkit and the various poking, prodding, opening, measuring, and grabbing tools that come with it will keep all your home’s electronics in working order.

This kit is great even for non-electronics. The small bits are great for doorknobs, eyeglasses, cabinet doors, sink fixtures, and more. If you are looking for a great addition to an artists or hobbyist's tool chest, look no further. The prying tools are great for sculpting clay and other materials.

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In addition to our thousands of repair professional and home tinkering customers, this kit has become very popular with domestic and international top secret intelligence agencies with three-letter names we can’t name here. Oh, and we’ve also sold kits to some computer company named after a fruit (not a pear or orange) and many of their competitors use the kits internally.

Tech Specs ¶ 

Dimensions: 2.5" x 5" x 10"
Weight: 1 lb 8 oz
Tool roll material: Nylon

 

Stories

zeblott's Story Photo #586365

My Problem

Recently I dropped my Nexus 6 and shattered the screen. This, in and of itself, is unusual. Every smartphone I have ever had had a case and a screen protector, and dropping it simply resulted in me having to pick it up. But with this phone I wanted to take care of it in a different way, and I bought this wallet[1] to consolidate all of the crap I carry around with me. I figured that the only time I'd have it out of the wallet is if I was actually using it. But I'm apparently lazy, and had the phone in my lap while driving home. By the time I got home I forgot it was there and just got out, which of course ejected the phone out onto the concrete, shattering the screen from the bottom right corner where it impacted.

My Fix

So after looking up how much it costs to replace the screen I made my first mistake, assumed that I was both smart enough and handy enough to replace only the glass. The glass piece itself isn't terribly expensive, and I believed that I could replace only the glass. So I ordered the piece, did research on how to do it, and quickly panicked, cancelled the order and got a refund.

Next I ordered the screen and digitizer http://www.etradesupply.com/motorola-nex... along with an iFixit Pro Tech Toolkit so I'd have everything I'd basically ever need for any other repairs that might be necessary in the future. Then I bought the Spigen Slim Armor case because I had one for my Nexus 5 which worked very well for me. My wife's response http://i.imgur.com/OMGMpVY.jpg was just hilarious.

After following the teardown guide https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/Nexus+6+... I quickly realized I didn't need to tear apart the battery side of the phone and let it be. After disconnecting the motherboard from the display assembly via the two ZIF connectors https://www.ifixit.com/Guide/Recognizing... , I was able to pull the two apart. This left me in a state of utter confusion as to how to proceed. The screen and digitizer replacement had nothing attached to it other than the cables mentioned above. The wide one is for the display and the small one is for the touch screen. Make sure it is attached straight or you won't be able to use your phone at all. Ask me how I know this. Since the display replacement had no assembly attached to it you have to reuse the one on the broken display. Use a spudger to separate the outer ring of plastic that houses the bolt holes. Carefully lift the metal interior and the plastic ring away from the broken screen and be sure to inspect it for any glass shards. I missed one until I tried to put it all back together and it kept it from closing all the way. Once the metal is gone, you'll notice that the back of the display has a foam layer glued to it that protects it from the metal. This is imperative to retrieve. Use a blow dryer or heat gun to loosen the bond of the adhesive, and gently peel it back, removing it in its entirety. Don't let it fold up on itself. Place this backing on your new display, exactly as it was on the old. The adhesive for the plastic ring won't hold anymore, so get some Scotch super glue http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0009F3... and apply a drop to a cotton swab and brush the inner sides of the display outer glass layer, which will be in contact with the plastic ring. Combine the ring, metal assembly, and display and hold it all together for 30 seconds or so. This process of reusing the assembly is a bit of meticulous work but will save you about $80. Reconnect the ZIF connections carefully to the motherboard and follow the teardown in reverse to finish putting it back together. One step they miss, however, is that in addition to the battery connection in the bottom right of the phone, on the top left is the connection for the physical buttons on the side. Remove the rubber cover and snap the ribbon cable that leads there back into place. You won't be able to power on your phone if you skip this step. Replace the rubber button cable cover and align the back cover and push it down to adhere the back of the phone once more to its innards. For the moment of truth, press the power button and pray to the old gods and the new that your phone turns on. Once it powers up, go gloat about your repair prowess to the next three people that you see. That's what I did, anyway.

My success is evidenced but the fact that I took this picture found below and typed this post using my fixed phone. It's not impossible. You can do it.

My Advice

ZIF connectors are finicky. Be super careful both when you're opening them and when you're reinserting the cables. Make sure both rubber hidden doors have the cables plugged in afterwards.

My Problem

The trackpad on my wife's 2011 Macbook Air started suffering from phantom clicks and was basically useless and in need of replacement.

My Fix

Once i had the right tools the repair went extremely quick.

My Advice

A Torx bit is not the same as a pentalobe. No matter how hard you try to make it work

My Problem

Needed a tool kit that could allow me to work on specific computer equipment.

My Fix

Excellent. Exactly what I needed.

My Advice

This is a great tool kit with everything you need for working on Apple laptops.

My Problem

Broken screen iphone 4, 4s, 5c. Fixed without a hitch except the Phillips bits would not seat very well in the screws on the iphones but they work just enough. Other than that the kit is fantastic. The suction cups are my favorite.

My Fix

Fair to midland.

My Advice

Please update the Phillips bits to some that fit a bit better. I'm probably just a bit picky on my bits. I think everyone knows what these phones look like so I wont need to share a photo. diy on my fellow web surfers

My Problem

lending laptop to a drunken colleague

accidental drop

screen cracked

the struggle was real

My Fix

swimmingly. from the user:

Hi Chris -

I wanted to say a huge heart felt thank you for all of your help and patience in having my laptop repaired. Yesterday Valeria replaced the cracked screen and I am fully functional! It's so exciting - and having my databases back from my old hard-drive has made mailings and closing out student pay roll a breeze! Thank you! And I still owe you summer lunch for a week!

Sent from my iPhone

My Advice

screen arrived with a connecter detached, but nothing a little solder could not fix. and off it went into the laptop.

pradsm's Story Photo #578316

My Problem

Nexus 4 has a broken audio jack plug broken off inside of the jack.

My Fix

I followed the Guide on IFIXIT to open it up, I was able to disconnect the audio jack and using one of the tools was able to remove the plug from the jack, took a while, my persistence got it out. Put the phone back together and its all working

My Advice

Get a IFIXIT Tool Kit, definitely does the job

My Problem

I have a short history of computer ownership. From an iBook G4 to a Gateway LT2016u to a Dell Latitude D630 to a Dell Inspiron 11 3000 (present). Each computer was replaced as the previous one developed issues seemingly beyond my ability to repair, until recently.

The iBook had charging and battery issues, along with the hardware becoming ever increasingly out-dated (still collecting dust). The Gateway has keyboard issues (likely stemming from spilling liquids of some sort). Finally, the Latitude D630 has a battery issue where it doesn't hold a charge and (until recently) would not connect to the internet wirelessly. I also have a 5th Generation iPod that has a broken screen.

One of the biggest hurdles in learning to repair the various broken electronics in my possession was not having the proper tools. As an automotive technician, I understand the importance of having the proper tools for the job at hand.

Thanks to iFixit's extensive repair guides and the Pro Tech Toolkit, I had the tools I needed to go ahead and repair my devices.

My Fix

Upon receiving the Pro Tech Toolkit, I was impressed by the quality of the tools included. I dove straight into getting familiar with the removal of basic components on the Gateway: RAM, Hard Drive, Keyboard. I found that the tools included in the Pro Tech Toolkit were vital to removing all of these components, specifically the keyboard.

I also made an attempt at dismantling my 5th Gen iPod, in order to remove the broken screen and to see the difficulty in the removal process. Thanks to the tools included in the Pro Tech Toolkit, as well as the extensive Repair Guide on iFixit regarding this process, the screen removal was a success! Following the successful screen removal, I placed an order through iFixit for a screen replacement as well as some spare iPod separation tools (considering these types of plastic tools are wearable items).

My Advice

Do not be afraid to tackle some basic electronics repair! Remember to have the proper tools on hand, follow the repair guides, and TAKE YOUR TIME!

Many of my repair projects have been waiting for years for me to get started on them, mainly due to not having the tools and knowledge (which I found on iFixit) to complete the repairs.

The Pro Tech Toolkit has EVERYTHING I need to get started on my repair projects, THANKS iFixit!

My Problem

The Battery was no longer holding a charge. What more is there to say?

My Fix

After watching several guides, especially the iFixit one, I felt very confident in replacing the battery, so we ordered the replacement kit (with the tools). Despite the screws being incredibly small, the repair went really well! I didn't remove the screen, as that seemed like an extra step, but I was careful about not damaging the ribbon for it too.

The two hardest parts were using the suction cup and the glue. The phone had a screen protector on the front, and no matter how hard I tried I could not get enough grip on the screen to pull it up with the protector on. I removed the protector, and while it did come up, it took a lot of force, which iFixit did mention in the video.

The second was the battery glue. The iFixit video outlined the best areas to apply my leverage too, which was really good information! It took a bit of coaxing, but was far easier than getting the screen off.

My Advice

- Watch multiple videos to familiarize yourself with the process

- You'll probably need to take off any screen protectors on the front, otherwise you would be able to apply enough upward force to get the screen off

- Have a place to store the two types of screws, they're so small and can be easily lost

- Go slowly, be careful!

My Problem

Wanted to give my 6 year old MacBook Pro an upgrade.

My Fix

This tool kit gave me all I needed to complete my MacBook upgrade and more. I will be fully prepared for any device repair in the future. Great product and I love that it's all bundled in the kit bag.

My Advice

No.

My Problem

I could not charge my iPod Touch.

My Fix

The charging port on my iPod Touch was very dirty. I used some of the tools from the Pro Tech ToolKit to get all the dust bunnies out. It worked, but it took a lot of cleaning. I had to get it all out making sure that it was 100% clean. Only then did it start charging again.

My Advice

Make absolutely certain that the device is not working before taking it apart. I was tempted to take apart my iPod Touch, but I'm glad I didn't.