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Yaron
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A replacement for the plastic feet of the Trackpad

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Hi,

I lost one of the plastic feet of the Trackpad. It is unbalanced now and the click won't work on the side of the missing foot.

Thanks,

Yaron

Edited by: oldturkey03 ( )

One of the plastic feet in my Trackpad keeps falling out - especially when moving/pushing the Trackpad on the table. It's like the rubber detaches from the plastic on the foot and then it all comes out of the hole in the plastic bottom cover. It's so bl.... annoying to open the pad all the time to replace it... Anyone who know has a clue how to fix it properly in correct position?

RSA,

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machead3
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You can purchase felt or plastic 'bumpers' at most local hardware stores. Buy a size large enough to match or exceed the other foot. You'll have spares should it happen again.

If this Answer is helpful please remember to return and mark it Accepted.

Edited by: machead3 ( )

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Jeremy Wray
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Since the Apple Bluetooth keyboard uses the same rubber feet, but on the keyboard, the feet don't provide an active function, I decided to take the feet off the Bluetooth keyboard to use on the trackpad. It's much easier to find a suitable replacement for the rubber feet on the keyboard because you don't need an exact size, pretty much any thin rubber foot will work.

In my case, I just needed one rubber foot for the trackpad, so I took both feet off the bottom of the keyboard and now have a spare if needed sometime in the future. To replace the feet I took off the keyboard, I used some 3M tabs that are adhesive on one side and have a rubbery, non-skid coating on the other. It works great for me.

--Admittedly, it would be difficult to find the PERFECT height feet for the keyboard if you keep the keyboard and trackpad side by side. If I used them in a desktop environment and they didn't line up perfectly, it would drive me crazy, but...I don't. I use both separately as peripheral devices for my media center (Mac Mini). They don't have to line up perfectly with each other because I'm usually in the bed when using either one.

If I HAD to make them line up, I'd start with some rubber feet that were as close as possible to the original height, but slightly taller, so I could carefully trim them down to the correct size. It wouldn't be the easiest thing to do, but I don't believe it would be too much of a pain in the rear either.

Anyway, there's my $0.02. Maybe it will help someone. Good Luck!

Edited by: Jeremy Wray ( )

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Rofang
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I cut a pencil eraser down to about 2.5mm and glued it in with a very thin layer of glue, making sure that the eraser was glued only to the exposed metal layer. It's working well now, but I may have to revisit it with a stronger glue now that I'm satisfied with the concept.

Great idea. Thanks.

Yaron,

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Jean1622
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I also used a pencil eraser. I did not use glue. I used one square inch of thin carton Sealing Tape to keep the rubber in place. Been working fine for two months now.

I found this posting because I was looking for the real rubber replacement ;-)

Edited by: Jean1622 ( )

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revher
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Please see Replacing Magic Trackpad Rubber.

However, if the rubber is lost I don't know where to buy a new one.

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Lorraine Hughes
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the best thing to do is go into trackpad preferences and add the tap and that disables the click down and u won't need those stupid feet anymore

This is the best answer!

christine,

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Alex
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I was having a similar problem: There was an annoying "click" noise when I was typing, and eventually I deduced it is because there are only TWO feet on the keyboard, and the center is unsupported, so it would bow just a bit under my slightly-aggressive-active style of typing. The simple solution was to use THREE of those hardware store bumpers that I had around, originally included with a picture frame so as not to scuff the wall. Only problem now is that it is ever so slightly higher than the Magic Track Pad buttressed next to it with a cool Magic Wand. Can live with it, but might get around to shaving them a bit later. Who cares...I'm happily typing away; furiously fast, of course!

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butchdog78
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I had the same problem. I lost one of the rubber bumpers on my track pad. I had a apple blue tooth key board that was not working so I removed the rubber bumpers from the key board. I trimmed away the outer edge of the bumpers so they fit neatly in the holes of the track pad. I attached the bumpers using the 3M adhesive strips that come with the little hooks you hang on your wall. I attached the key board (trimmed down) bumper pad to one side of the adhesive tape, then carefully trimmed away the excess around the bumper pads. Next I pulled the protective paper from the 3M adhesive and made some small minor shaping until it was round and the same size of the bumper pad. I attached the bumper pad to the track pad. I then did the other size so they would be the same. It worked great. No problems at this point.

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John Dhom
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In system preferences enable 'tap to click'... I like this much better then actually clicking anyway.

I haven't found replacement feet yet :(

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Adam
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Thanks everyone for inexpensive workable solutions. I was about to buy a new track pad because the apple store didnt sell this part. When i went to ace hardware to look at bumpers i ran across small cork bottle stoppers that cost $.20. 20 cents! Easy to shave down with a knife. Glued it on using a single drop of super glue. Works gteat. Saved $68.80!

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sergefranchois
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Tried and verified. Adhesive rubber feet 8mm x 2.5mm.

On ebay for less than 2 pounds sterling for a 5-pack

See "Adhesive Rubber Feet Buffer Bumper Stop Cheap Soft Close Black Clear Free post" by proper design seller. # 321526318681.

Fits perfectly, and provides a soft, short-travel click.

Good luck with it

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Zhora VandenBout
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(My actual fixes for the detached feet are at the bottom but it wouldn't hurt to glance at the preliminary suggestions before tearing apart your trackpad.)

My first trackpad foot came loose after only 3 months of use. I did get Apple to replace the trackpad on warranty though I had to go up to Level 2 support since the "tech person" I got said that it wasn't covered since it could only happen from misuse (which I guess means placing the trackpad in one spot and never moving it from then on). [Thanks to my local Apple authorized repair shop who couldn't fix it on warranty because Apple wouldn't approve a fix or replacement by them. They told me that Level 1 wouldn't be able to do anything and I'd have to go to Level 2. Once I went up a level the tech person immediately arranged for a replacement to be sent.]

New trackpad, shorter warranty period, eventually same problem, now I'm on my own. This time I took the back off th trackpad to reset the foot I'd opened it once a while before to adjust it so it wouldn't click too easily and used a great guide that was very clear about being careful about the three plastic tabs that hold the lower side in place. This time, not remembering clearly how to open it, I searched and found a guide that wasn't as clear and I managed to break off all three of the tabs. (AFTER his step by step guide on removing the back of the trackpad the writer casually mentioned that perhaps it was best to begin opening the back at the top in order to avoid breaking the tabs. At the end, after the steps? We've had cut and paste available to edit what we write since the first Macintosh was created! BAD WRITER!) So I'll state here the two major lessons of trackpad (or any repair):

  • (Trackpad specific) BEWARE THE THREE PLASTIC TABS AT THE BOTTOM! START FROM THE TOP AND CAREFULLY LIFT OFF THE BACK WHEN YOU GET TO THE BOTTOM!)

which leads to the next couple more general rules:

  • FIND A GOOD GUIDE. Look at more than one guide to get the best informations you can!
  • READ THE ENTIRE GUIDE BEFORE STARTING. Better yet, read more than one guide and print the best you find if necessary. Add notes from the other guides your read so you'll see them when you need to.

That may seem like overkill but I replaced a laptop screen using two guides, each of which mentioned something important that the other did not. I replaced the screen without anything going wrong. (And I can state from my own experience that soldering those little tiny microphone wires is not something you would like to do…and they and other things may be sturdy when in place yet very fragile when exposed during a repair.)

(one more Trackpad specific note (but a positive one):

  • Ignoring the lovely detailing such as those buttons that look so nice until the third or fourth time one or both fall out, the Trackpad is a sturdy device overall. Several times during button replacement or adjustment I have slipped with a screwdriver or other tool and scraped or landed on the internal circuity in a way that felt like I must have finally done it in. Despite the missing tabs which caused the back to slip off now and then or the constantly roaming feet that required opening, closing, slipping and gluing things over and over the trackpad keeps functioning as it should. Don't stab at it to prove it to yourself but don't run off crying before you test it to see if all is OK. It really is a sturdy item (despite those stupid feet that must have been designed by the same person who created the totally round, totally frustrating mouse of an older (very round) iMac or who designed the new flat key keyboard and hid it inside such artfully beautiful packaging (Made by Apple in California!)

But after seemingly endless repairs to the trackpad's feet I have reached a solution where I can't remember having a problem for several years: I finally took the feel that came loose and placed them over the holes on the outside instead of inside. At first I carefully glued them (which didn't last) and then carefully put tape around the edges, leaving the operational middle of the feet uncovered to allow them to work correctly (which didn't last). Finally I just placed the feet in the right place on the outside of the trackpad case and laid a piece of semi-flexible electrical tape right over each foot, not tight enough to hold the foot in a depressed condition but not extremely loose either. Since then I've never had a problem with them detaching again. An added benefit for me was that clicking them required a slightly more force than before the fix and I no longer suffer from frequent accidental clicks when I'm trying to tap or drag.

I imagine that it would work just as well if a foot was lost and replaced using one of the suggestions of other commenters. I think it required one slight adjustment of the tape to get things to work as I liked. (I like having the click and tap options since I use BetterTouchTool and have made taps and clicks do different functions. If you only want to tap and dont' need to click then removing the feet as someone suggested above may be a good way to go.

Also, having lost the tabs that help hold on the back and tiring of having to re-glue it in place now and then I added a very narrow strip of transparent tape (and just the cheap transparent tape used for general taping in an office or home) around the back to hold the curved edge of the back to the very thin aluminum curve of the top of the body. (To do so, I placed the tape and pressed it down to conform with the trackpad letting it stick out from the sides and bottom and then used a razor blade or X-ACTO knife to trim it tightly along the very edge. (Both of these fixes work so well for me that I actually had to examine the trackpad to remember how I'd fixed it successfully!)

WATCH OUT FOR THOSE 3 PLASTIC TABS!!!

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