Introduction

The magic of the Magic Trackpad is its ability to physically click - while appearing to not have any moving parts.

The secret to the Magic Trackpad's clicking ability is in those innocuous looking round rubber feet on the bottom. They're not just there to be normal old rubber feet that merely provide grip to keep it from sliding around on your desk. And they're not entirely rubber, either. The rubber you see and feel protruding from the bottom is only a very thin and fragile sheath covering a hard plastic foot.

The feet need to be rigid: When you click the surface by pressing down on it these rubber/plastic feet are the only parts of the trackpad that *don't move*.

This guide will explain how to re-insert one (or both) of the Magic Trackpad's rubber feet

Parts

No parts required.

Unscrew the battery door by turning the screw counter-clockwise with a flat edge screwdriver, coin, plastic opening tool, or fingernail. Unscrew the battery door by turning the screw counter-clockwise with a flat edge screwdriver, coin, plastic opening tool, or fingernail. Unscrew the battery door by turning the screw counter-clockwise with a flat edge screwdriver, coin, plastic opening tool, or fingernail.
  • Unscrew the battery door by turning the screw counter-clockwise with a flat edge screwdriver, coin, plastic opening tool, or fingernail.

Add Comment

The rubber buffer consists of two parts, a rigid part made ​​of plastic and the sheath is made ​​of rubber. If the shape of the foot is not perfectly spherical, as in the photo, which can be caused by one of the two rubber flap that came out of the notch. Put it back. And it is spherical again. If the shape of the foot is not perfectly spherical, as in the photo, which can be caused by one of the two rubber flap that came out of the notch. Put it back. And it is spherical again.
  • The rubber buffer consists of two parts, a rigid part made ​​of plastic and the sheath is made ​​of rubber.

  • If the shape of the foot is not perfectly spherical, as in the photo, which can be caused by one of the two rubber flap that came out of the notch. Put it back. And it is spherical again.

These rubber feet are nowhere to be bought. If anybody has found them, please please add comment

Robert Lozano - Reply

see my pencil eraser solution above if you really want to buy rubber feet you would probably source "isoprene rubber feet 8mm x 3mm" on eBay Closest thing I could find although I never bought them You wold still need to superglue them on as the original feet were custom designed and made for Apple

Alan Fiermonte -

Deck the Halls
With tools and Fix Kits
Using a small flathead screwdriver, gently break the seal between the white plastic backing and the metal top. Pry up the corner with the screwdriver Place the rubber foot back in place.
  • Using a small flathead screwdriver, gently break the seal between the white plastic backing and the metal top.

  • Pry up the corner with the screwdriver

  • Place the rubber foot back in place.

  • Squeeze closed the backing and metal (it will snap into place).

  • Click on trackpad to test.

  • Insert the battery and you are done.

  • It may happen again when you move inadvertently a sheet of paper under the trackpad contributing involuntarily to the extraction of one of the rubber feet.

I found that using a mini screwdriver and simply lifting the backing about an inch above the hole on the side you can simply slide the foot back into place without breaking the seal.

khailadyn - Reply

or you can lift the backing from inside the hole first with a letter opener, then lift in up from outside. This way there's no damage to the plastic at all!

timsoyc - Reply

Easy-peasy! The first method worked perfectly 4 me!

Peter Biber - Reply

BTW, tks for your help -- and the pics!

Peter Biber - Reply

I snapped both foot clips during closing, but so far this hasn't affected the repair. If clumsy like me, step 4 may be a better option.

Andrew Maxwell - Reply

If you want to remove the plastic cover completely I recommend opening it from the top side not to break any of the clips in the bottom. The cover is attached to the trackpad through rubber glue on the plastic grid and four clips in the bottom. It is a convenient and even a better method in order to not alter the fragile rubber feet. Take your time to slowly open the plastic cover from the top side. It is a convenient and even a better method in order to not alter the fragile rubber feet. Take your time to slowly open the plastic cover from the top side.
  • If you want to remove the plastic cover completely I recommend opening it from the top side not to break any of the clips in the bottom. The cover is attached to the trackpad through rubber glue on the plastic grid and four clips in the bottom.

  • It is a convenient and even a better method in order to not alter the fragile rubber feet. Take your time to slowly open the plastic cover from the top side.

Excellent, thank you! It worked!

A Luban - Reply

Totally solved.! Much better solution. Throw away the useless apple feet! Mine fell out at least once a week drove me mad and I almost binned the trackpad even though I liked it. . Find two kitchen door plastic/rubber sticky buffers. They are the right size stick in place and solve the problem. Mine are in a month now no problems. Maybe apple should fit them as standard as they are much better!! enjoy!

keith wren - Reply

Tried the corner-only method and it didn’t work… Made the whole thing worse.

Then, opened up the back completely, and used a tiny drop of super glue to reattach the foot to the backing material. Now it works like new! Thanks!

I’d also considered replacing the feet with drops of hot-melt glue allowed to dry… But that wasn’t necessary. (this time)

Gordon Firemark - Reply

Finish Line

101 other people completed this guide.

revher

Member since: 08/17/2013

3,855 Reputation

3 Guides authored

32 Comments

where can i buy the plastic feet?????

Lorraine Hughes - Reply

Found this guide confusing. Here's what worked for me:

1. Place the tip of a butter knife inside the hole and gently lift the plastic high enough to place the tip of another butter knife on the side and hold the plastic up.

2. Remove the first butter knife from the hole. Gently raise the plastic with the second butter knife high enough to slide the foot underneath.

3. Use the first butter knife to slide/rotate the foot into place

Jeremy Johnson - Reply

You don't have to open up the trackpad at all. Simply reinsert the rubber inside the opening and wiggle it in. It's elastic so you have enough leeway to do this fairly easily. Took me 30 seconds and I didn't need any tools or break something.

Stephan Seidt - Reply

Thanks to Stephan Seidt I FIX IT!!!!

Marco Carboni -

I first tried this too,but it didn't seem to work. Inspired by this message, I tried again and with some finesse it seems to be fixed without opening anything.

Dmitry Minkovsky -

I tried this too first, but it didn't go all the way in and the button was stuck pressed, so I had to pry it open and sneak the rubber from behind.

luisgpr -

+1.

This trick is by far the best process to replace the rubber stamps which always get flew from their holes.

Gaétan RYCKEBOER -

I use a toothpick. Use the finger from one hand to hold it in place. prod the rubber into the hold with the toothpick and roll the toothpick towards the outside. You will likely have to poke the rubber a bit. Be careful not to tear the rubber. IT may not function perfectly at first, but will eventually work its way back to normal.

jonathan - Reply

Just reinserting the feet is only a temporary fix. The feet were originally attached to the bottom plate with adhesive. The adhesive dries up and allows the feet to detach.

To reattach the feet, I use Loctite Stick'n Seal Ultra adhesive.

Follow the guide to remove the bottom plate, then peel off the residual adhesive around the foot holes, and clean the area using a cotton swab and alcohol. Clean the feet also.

Apply adhesive to both surfaces using a cotton swab. Be careful to avoid getting adhesive where it doesn't belong. Just a thin coat on both surfaces is all that is needed. Then reinsert the feet, and use a fresh dry cotton swab to gently press them against the bottom plate. Set the plate aside on a raised surface, letting the area with the feet hang over the edge. The glue is dry enough to reassemble after about 1/2 hour, but full cure takes 24 hours.

Jeff Cook - Reply

The toothpick method seems to work well.

The trackpad wasnt clicking, i took the rubber point out (the rubber and plastic part with it) cleaned it a bit and but it back with the tootpick.

Took me five minutes and seems to work.

Be carefull: the point of the tootpick was breaking during the action, you dont want parts of the toothpick to remain between the parts.

Robert - Reply

Does anyone know where you can buy replace feet at?

Shayne Zundel - Reply

I too am after the feet! One seems to have gone missing... any ideas?

Gavin Hudson -

THE COMMON PENCIL ERASER SOLUTION: Rubber feet specification is approx 2.5mm high x 8mm wide So I used two 2.5mm thick slices of WHITE pencil eraser (these are a little less than 8mm wide, but oh well, so they don't fit the hole exactly flush) and just superglued them to the metal showing thru the back cover hole It worked perfectly and left the trackpad even on the desk (Slicing technique: I used really sharp Exacto knife (make sure you are slicing flat, not at an angle --- i.e. when you are slicing using a very slight sawing motion, do not push down too hard on the knife or the slice comes off a bit angled due to the flexibility of the rubber eraser). If I lose one, I'll just cut and glue another one Cost = 0 if you have this stuff around the house Time = 5 minutes, not including hunting down the stuff I needed

Alan Fiermonte - Reply

This is great. Worked like a charm. Not noticeable at all and clicks like the original. Thanks!

brettswanson -

I'm looking for the feet too! Apple doesn't sell them. And nobody else does either apparently!

Bri Cab - Reply

Good reference material for making repairs. I had a tear in one of the rubber feet. I used a carpet knife to slide under the white plastic back and gently pry to break the bond of the rubber cement. Once the back was off, I was able to extract and repair the rubber membrane using krazy glue. It worked rather well despite being very fiddly work. I used an illuminated magnifier on a desk arm to help me get the krazy glue in just the tear in the membrane. Once done, it popped in nicely. I also used an Exacto knife and the magnifier to gently scrape off the rubber cement from the plastic grid. Then I put strips of double sided scotch tape on the white back over the area where the plastic grid would touch. re-assembling it was as easy as inserting the tabs and applying gentle pressure. Works fine now.

Gary Gauthier - Reply

No need to pry it open. I used one of those flat plastic toothpick / dental floss thingies to gently tuck the rubber ring through the white plastic backing. Worked in seconds.

bMan French - Reply

I've just tried the 'common eraser solution' suggested by Alan and... it works! 5 stars.

handsonhat - Reply

Anyone know where I can buy replacement feet? I searched ebay and the ones there don't look the same and can't seem to find them anywhere. any suggestions? Thanks

Dave MacDonald - Reply

Alan, theTHE COMMON PENCIL ERASER SOLUTION is genius! Works great and just saved me dropping $80 for a new track pad. Thank you!!!

indigoblue218 - Reply

Orig post- fantastic solution - great pics and narrative. thank you for posting !!

bobbaima - Reply

Thank you for posting these fine pictures. I was able to repair mine by starting from the battery end. You need a small screw driver to get started.

The other end, with the pads, have tabs that are recessed in the metal. They'll break if you start there. I know! The whole white piece is glued in various place underneath.

So have some gorilla glue handy.

Fernando

Fernando - Reply

After replacing these many, many times, I hope the two-sided "scotch" tape I placed at each bottom corner between the pad and the plastic back will hold and keep this from happening again. Since this seems to be a common problem, I find it frustrating that Apple doesn't provide a better replacement solution other than "that will be $129 for a new track pad, thank you very much" Cha ching!

Edward Arroyo - Reply

No, the two sided "scotch" tape did not work inside each bottom corner to keep the feet from working their ways out again. I have now tried small amounts of mixed Gorilla epoxy just at the corner points between the metal pad and the plastic back to try to make sure the re-inserted feet stay in place, while trying to be careful not to let the glue spread over to where the feet are. Will wait 24 hours for this to dry with clamps holding it together and see if this keeps the feet from working their way out again.

Edward Arroyo - Reply

Mmm...I simply don't want to risk damaging the track pad tabs...Going to try the dental floss stick as it won't damage the rubber. Meanwhile, .I cut a square of transparent sheet plastic from a tomato carton ,folded it in half and cut a semi circle from the fold ,lay the feet upright over the holes and used sticky tape to hold them in...fiddly but haven't damaged anything...and the buttons work(until the sticky tape stops being sticky...

derek - Reply

Thanks for this, worked perfectly for me, cheers.

Philip Blair - Reply

Really useful and easy to follow. Thanks.

Ken Brewster - Reply

I used a think rubber strip cut to just fit inside the round area and then stacked until i found the right depth the properly click and then used a piece of gray duct tape to hold down, worked well.

ralph - Reply

I cracked the glass, must have wedged it too hard.

David Farlow - Reply

WHERE TO BUY: Just search on ebay for “Magic Trackpad Touchpad A1339 Bottom Rubber Feet Foot”, you'll find some vendors from China.

Timon - Reply

SAFE METHOD: This method doesn't require to pry open the white plastic cover, to get the replacement feet in.

Prerequisites: toothpick / patience

1. Lay the trackpad on its back so you can see the rubber feet hole. We'll leverage the fact, that when you click the trackpad, the gap inside the hole becomes a touch wider.

2. The rubber foot has a small solid piece of plastic in the middle. Put the rubber feet above the center of the hole.

3. Make sure you get the click noise when you apply a bit of pressure in the center of the replacement foot. This widens the gap between the plastic cover and the metal.

4. Use one finger to keep the pressure on the rubber foot center, so that the gap stays widened the whole time.

5.Use the toothpick with your other hand to carefully push the ends of the thin rubber underneath the white plastic cover. The rubber should almost slide underneath it by itself with a little bit of pushing from the toothpick. This might take several tries and patience, but it's a risk free method!

Timon - Reply

This worked well enough for me. I have some minor scratches on the bottom of the trackpad now, but the little rubber foot is securely back in place.

thanks!

Danny Walker - Reply

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