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Repair guides, support, and troubleshooting information for the 2022 13-inch MacBook Air, featuring Apple's M2 SoC. Released on July 15th, 2022 and identified by model number A2681.

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Upgrade NAND SSD Storage?

How about the NAND SSD, is it replaceable with an SSD that has more Storage?

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And is it possible to soldered the NAND SSD? (meant resoldered)

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@Jakub Blecha Who knows ? Technically yes, if you are able to find compatible NANDs with better capacity, a limited number of high level microsolderers may replace them without destroying the logic board. Cost wouldn't be cheap though, nothing than can be compared to an ssd replacement.

On top of that, Apple has a nasty habit to serialize parts for "security" reasons. Are NAND memories serialized on M2 Macs ? I don't know, but experiences from iPhones would suggest yes, they probably are, thus there would be involved low level programming that needs reverse engineering and proper hacking tools. I'm pretty sure if there will be a demand one day some chinese engineer will provide the tool at a price, but it's all very theoretic right now.

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The only guy who can tell you is Louis Rossmann. He's in the USA and you can ship it to him for repair.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_Ross...

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Tracy Fortune, That’s simply not true. @tomchai gave the answer below here, in July of last year!

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@geirandersen If the OP was a board-level repairer, they wouldn't be asking here- they'd have already fixed it themselves. Obviously, they are not-- thus I support an exemplary person to do the required work. It is you who is in error. Cheers.

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Those are not raw NAND chips, they are one-chip SSDs similar to eMMC, but Apple proprietary.

Apple uses several chips to set up a RAID configuration with the Mx chip as the storage array controller, presenting to the OS as a complete volume.

The Mx seems to also need to access additional data not available in storage mode to get system configuration data, like serial numbers, storage configuration, board firmware and so on to be able to boot.

Replacing the storage chips on M1 macs is possible, but requires chip taken off a working Mac and install them in the exact order as the original. From what I remember a NAND programmer is also needed to re-write serial information

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There's no SSD, just a handful of raw NAND chips soldered to the logic board, thus no, nothing that can be replaced.

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The correct answer is Yes, it is possible but you need access to replacement NAND from Apple. As far as I know, only authorized service centers have these chips. The one I talked to said they needed a work order from Apple and that it was not happening for upgrades at this time (only replacement for defects). Once installed, initializing it is the same as NAND in the iMac Pro or 2019 Mac Pro using a second Mac and Apple Configurator.app

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@mikehallor61612 Read again the question I answered to as it seems you didn't.

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@arbaman don't you be a stranger over here :-)

As always, good to read your comments and answers

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@oldturkey03 Your comment kicked me here instantly :)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sezc05A4...

I was still a kid myself..oldies but goodies

Great to see you're still so active here around :)

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@arbaman I was a young kid as well when it first came out :-) but its as true today as it was when it came out!

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For the M2 Macbook Air specifically, it is currently unknown whether it is possible or not.

However, we can draw some conclusions from previous models of iPhone and Macbooks.

Such upgrades are very much possible on the M1 Macbook Air. Similar "impossible" upgrades have also been achieved on every currently supported iPhone model. There are a great many naysayers who think that board level modifications are too scary or too dangerous. People like that likely hold what is called a fixed mindset, where they don't think that things can be changed. Those with growth mindsets, believe that things can change and become better if effort is put towards making things that way. To counter their points, technicians in China have been doing it for a long time. Here are just a few links to people who have achieved such things.

https://youtu.be/0ecSzeqYX3E

Translated Version: https://www-chongdiantou-com.translate.g...

Original untranslated: https://www.chongdiantou.com/archives/73...

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If you had the patience to read and try to understand questions, maybe you would understand the answers too.

So much for the "naysayers"..

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Yes, in most cases the NAND SSD in an Intel Evo platform laptop can be replaced with a higher-capacity SSD. This is often referred to as "upgrading the storage." The process of replacing the SSD typically involves removing the bottom cover of the laptop, locating the SSD, and physically removing it, then installing a new SSD in its place.

It's important to note that the process of upgrading the storage can vary depending on the laptop model and manufacturer, and it is generally recommended to follow the manufacturer's instructions for performing the upgrade. Additionally, some laptop models may have specific requirements for the new SSD storage, such as the form factor, interface, and performance specifications, so it's a good idea to check the laptop's manual or manufacturer's website for compatibility information before making the upgrade.

It's also worth mentioning that upgrading the storage in a laptop can void the warranty, so it's a good idea to consider this before proceeding with the upgrade. In some cases, the warranty can be reinstated by installing the original SSD back into the laptop.

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Friedbert Krumnagel will be eternally grateful.
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