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Universal Drive Adapter

$29.95

Product code: IF107-108-1

Product Overview

Plug and Play/Hot Swappable, this adapter turns any IDE or SATA drive into an external storage solution making it easy to transfer files from your computer or notebook.

Compatible with 2.5" and 3.5" PATA/IDE hard drives, 2.5" and 3.5" SATA hard drives, and 5.25" PATA/IDE optical drives.

Not compatible with SATA/PATA Slim optical drives or MacBook Air/MacBook Pro Retina hard drives.

An external power adapter is included to supply sufficient power for 3.5" hard drives and 5.25" optical drives. USB power without the external power adapter provides sufficient power for most 2.5" hard drives.

Compatibility

  • All G3 Lombard and Pismo PowerBooks
  • All G4 PowerBooks
  • All iBooks
  • All Mac Minis
  • All G5 and Intel iMacs
  • All MacBooks
  • All MacBook Pros (excluding MacBook Pro Retina)
  • All G5 and Mac Pro Desktops

Product Details

  • Compatible With: 2.5"/3.5"/5.25" SATA and IDE Devices
  • Computer Input: USB 2.0
  • Data Transfer Speed: up to 480 Mbs
  • Compatibility Limit: Will support hard drives up to 2TB

  $29.95

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

6 month warranty

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50+ Available

Quantity:

 

Install Videos

 

Compatibility

iBook G3 12"
500 MHz
600 MHz (16 VRAM)
600 MHz (8 VRAM)
700 MHz
700 MHz (Opaque)
800 MHz
900 MHz
iBook G3 14"
600 MHz
700 MHz
800 MHz
900 MHz
iBook G3 Clamshell
300 MHz
366 MHz
366 MHz (Firewire)
466 MHz
iBook G4 12" 1.33 GHz
1.33 GHz
iBook G4 12" 800 MHz-1.2 GHz
1 GHz
1.2 GHz
800 MHz
iBook G4 14" 1.42 GHz
1.42 GHz
iBook G4 14" 933 MHz-1.33 GHz
1 GHz (128 RAM)
1 GHZ (256 RAM)
1.2 GHz
1.33 GHz
933 MHz
iMac G5 17" Model A1058
1.6 GHz
1.8 GHz (EMC No. 1989)
1.8 GHz (EMC No. 2055)
2 GHz
iMac G5 17" Model A1144
1.9 GHz
iMac G5 20" Model A1076
1.8 GHz
2 GHz
iMac G5 20" Model A1145
2.1 GHz
iMac Intel 17"
1.83 GHz (EMC No. 2104)
1.83 GHz (EMC No. 2110)
1.83 GHz (EMC No. 2124)
2 GHz
2.16 GHz
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2105 and 2118
2 GHz (EMC No. 2105)
2.16 GHz
2.33 GHz
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2133 and 2210
2 GHz (EMC No. 2133)
2.4 GHz (EMC No. 2133)
2.4 GHz (EMC No. 2210)
2.66 GHz (EMC No. 2210)
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2266
2.66 GHz (EMC No. 2266)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2308
3.06 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
3.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2389
3.06 GHz (Core i3)
3.2 GHz (Core i3)
3.6 GHz (Core i5)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2428
2.5 GHz (Core i5)
2.7 GHz (Core i5)
2.8 GHz (Core i7)
iMac Intel 21.5" EMC 2544
2.7 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
2.9 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
3.1 GHz (Core i7, Late 2012)
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2111
2.16 GHz
2.33 GHz
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2134 and 2211
2.4 GHz
2.8 GHz (EMC No. 2134)
2.8 GHz (EMC No. 2211)
3.06 GHz (EMC No. 2211)
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2267
2.66 GHz
2.93 GHz
3.06 GHz (EMC No. 2267)
iMac Intel 27"
2.66 GHz (Quad Core i5)
2.7 GHz (Core i5)
2.8 GHz (Quad Core i5)
2.8 GHz (Quad Core i7)
2.93 GHz (Quad Core i7)
3.06 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
3.1 GHz (Core i5)
3.2 GHz (Core i3)
3.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
3.4 GHz (Core i7)
3.6 GHz (Core i5)
iMac Intel 27" EMC 2546
2.9 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
3.2 GHz (Core i5, Late 2012)
3.4 GHz (Core i7, Late 2012)
Mac mini (PowerPC)
1.25 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.42 GHz
1.5 GHz
Mac Mini Late 2012
2.3 GHz (Quad i7, Late 2012)
2.5 GHz (Dual i5, Late 2012)
2.6 GHz (Quad i7, Late 2012)
Mac Mini Mid 2011
2 GHz (Quad i7, Mid 2011)
2.3 GHz (Dual i5, Mid 2011)
2.5 GHz (Dual i5, Mid 2011)
2.7 GHz (Dual i7, Mid 2011)
Mac mini Model A1176
1.5 GHz (Core Solo, A1176)
1.66 GHz (Core Duo, Early 2006)
1.66 GHz (Core Duo, Late 2006)
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2007)
1.83 GHz (Core Duo, Late 2006)
2 GHz (Core 2 Duo, A1176)
Mac mini Model A1283
2 GHz (Core 2 Duo, A1283)
2.26 GHz (A1283)
2.53 GHz (A1283)
2.66 GHz (A1283)
Mac mini Model A1347
2.4 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2010)
Mac Pro
2 GHz (Quad Core Original) Mac Pro
2.26 GHz (8 Core Early 2009) Mac Pro
2.4 GHz (8 Core Mid 2010) Mac Pro
2.66 GHz (12 Core Mid 2010) Mac Pro
2.66 GHz (8 Core Early 2009) Mac Pro
2.66 GHz (Quad Core Early 2009) Mac Pro
2.66 GHz (Quad Core Original) Mac Pro
2.8 GHz (8 Core Early 2008) Mac Pro
2.8 GHz (Quad Core Early 2008) Mac Pro
2.8 GHz (Quad Core Mid 2010) Mac Pro
2.93 GHz (12 Core Mid 2010) Mac Pro
2.93 GHz (8 Core Early 2009) Mac Pro
2.93 GHz (Quad Core Early 2009) Mac Pro
3 GHz (8 Core Early 2008) Mac Pro
3 GHz (8 Core Original) Mac Pro
3 GHz (Quad Core Original) Mac Pro
3.2 GHz (8 Core Early 2008) Mac Pro
3.2 GHz (Quad Core Mid 2010) Mac Pro
3.33 GHz (6 Core Mid 2010) Mac Pro
3.33 GHz (Quad Core Early 2009) Mac Pro
MacBook Core 2 Duo
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2 GHz (C2D, Late 2006)
2 GHz (C2D, Mid 2007)
2 GHz (Early 2009)
2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.1 GHz (Penryn)
2.13 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
MacBook Core Duo
1.83 GHz (Core Duo)
2 GHz (Core Duo)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
2.7 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.8 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009
2.26 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012
2.5 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.9 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Model A1211
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Models A1226 and A1260
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
MacBook Pro 15" Core Duo Model A1150
1.83 GHz (Core Duo)
2 GHz (Core Duo)
2.16 GHz (Core Duo)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody 2.53 GHz Mid 2009
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Early 2011
2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2008 and Early 2009
2.4 GHz (Late 2008)
2.53 GHz (Late 2008)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.8 GHz (Late 2008)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Late 2011
2.2 GHz (Late 2011)
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2009
2.66 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2012
2.3 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.6 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.7 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Pro 17" Models A1151 A1212 A1229 and A1261
2.16 GHz (Core Duo)
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody
2.53 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Early 2009)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.8 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.93 GHz (Early 2009)
3.06 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Early 2011
2.2 GHz (Early 2011)
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 17" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.5 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Unibody Model A1278
2 GHz (A1278)
2.4 GHz (A1278)
MacBook Unibody Model A1342
2.26 GHz (A1342)
2.4 GHz (A1342)
Power Mac G5
1.6 GHz
1.8 GHz (EMC No. 1969)
1.8 GHz (Late 2004)
1.8 GHz Dual (EMC No. 1969)
1.8 GHz Dual (EMC No. 1969C)
2.0 GHz Dual (EMC No. 1969)
2.0 GHz Dual (EMC No. 1969C)
2.0 GHz Dual (EMC No. 2023)
2.0 GHz Dual (EMC No. 2061)
2.3 GHz Dual (EMC No. 2023)
2.3 GHz Dual (EMC No. 2061)
2.5 GHz Dual (EMC No. 1969C)
2.5 GHz Quad
2.7 GHz Dual
PowerBook G3 Lombard
333 MHz
400 MHz
PowerBook G3 Pismo
400 MHz
500 MHz
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 12" 1-1.5 GHz
1 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.5 GHz
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 12" 867 MHz
867 MHz
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 15" 1-1.5 GHz
1 GHz
1.25 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.5 GHz (BT 1.1)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 15" 1.5-1.67 GHz
1.5 GHz (BT 2.0)
1.67 GHz (Low-Res)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 15" 1.67 GHz
1.67 GHz (High-Res)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 17" 1-1.67 GHz
1 GHz
1.33 GHz
1.5 GHz
1.67 GHz (Low-Res)
PowerBook G4 Aluminum 17" 1.67 GHz (High-Res)
1.67 GHz (High-Res)
PowerBook G4 Titanium DVI
1 GHz
667 MHz
800 MHz
867 MHz
PowerBook G4 Titanium Mercury
400 MHz
500 MHz
PowerBook G4 Titanium Onyx
550 MHz
667 MHz
 

Stories

My Problem

The problem was the HD I had replaced in an iMac and was hoping to be able to read some of the data but no luck . Also I wanted to say you got me with your April fool's day joke . I thought Oh how can Apple be owning this and giving advice on tearing down their products what a good one that was . You are great thanks ..

My Fix

The reading did not happen but happy with the item and delivery thanks

My Advice

Some things cannot be fixed .

My Problem

We have an early 2009 model 24" iMac that had recently started to perform very slowly. It only had 4gb of RAM and the hard drive was getting a little noisy so I was concerned that it might go out soon. I decided to try both maxing out the RAM at 8gb and swapping out the HDD for a solid state drive.

My Fix

The repair went swimmingly with the guide I found on iFixit for replacing the hard drive in a 20" early 2009 model iMac. Found here: http://www.ifixit.com/Guide/iMac+Intel+2...

The repair took about an hour, and probably would have been shorter if I hadn't had to reposition the solid state drive in it's special chassis a few times to make the cables reach.

My Advice

Wear gloves and try to handle the front "glass" and display as little as possible. This will make cleanup prior to re-installation much easier. The cabling is a tad more complicated on the 24" model, but still very manageable, just remember to hook everything back up as you re-assemble!

My Problem

Working on my 2006 MBP , computer suddenly shut down, no warning of low battery, nothing. I immediately plugged in the charger, and noticed that the mag. plug did not / would not change to the orange charging state. I then checked the battery, ¾ charged. I managed to get the MBP laptop running again, immediately backed up all important files, just in time for it to shutdown again. Thanks to IFIXIT forums, I Narrowed the problem down to either the Left I/O Board or the Pram Battery.

My Fix

The repair went well. Followed the online repair guide, no problems. Upon completion, I plugged the MBP charger in, and it immediately changed from green to orange charging state! Yipee! Having not completely reassembled the case, I tried starting up the laptop. No Luck. The PRAM battery is located under the DVD drive. I had to manufacture my own PRAM Battery by removing the wire pigtail off the old battery, and soldering it to the a new 2032 button Battery, in which I wrapped in electrical tape. Upon reinstall, I was able to start up my MBP, but only for about 20 minutes, then the notorious shutdown again. Upon more inspection, I found that the Generic Battery I just purchased last year must have also suffered a failure. By snapping in an older Apple 1175 battery, I haven't had any problems since. I am of the opinion that during the previous evening, my MBP must have suffered an electrical surge, damaging the Left I/O Board, the Pram Battery and the Main battery. Luckily no damage to the motherboard. Thank You IFIXIT ! RSRSPARKY !

My Advice

Take your time. If your mechanically inclined you can fix anything. Being an electrician, I'm used to taking things apart, and repairing appliances, microwaves, lighting fixtures etc. By following the repair guides you should have no problems. Purchase the tool set & magnetic mat to keep all those micro screws in place!

My Problem

Hard drive went out on mid 2010 MacBook Pro 13 inch.

My Fix

Took less than 10 minutes to swap out.

My Advice

Guide was straight forward

My Problem

I have had a mac book pro 17" for 3 years, I have had many beers, much food over it, and it's never missed a beat. Alas about 4 weeks ago, that one beer too many fell and no life was seen. I went through the stages of grief, and eventually found acceptance so then took it to a mac repair specialist. Two days later they said it was dead, and either $2800 to replace the logic board or buy a new mac air for $2480. So I again went through the several stages of grief. Then one morning I woke, determined to see if I can fix it myself...after all what could I lose. I found the ifixit web site, purchased the pro tool kit and the universal drive adaptor. Four days after ordering it arrived in Australia. That weekend I started to pull the mac apart. I first removed the hard drive and connected it up to another mac with the drive adaptor. SUCCESS...the drive still worked, I then cleaned the computer, pulled the logic board out, put it back together and...it started sort of...but the keyboard now appears to be doing strange things....press an L and you get an A. And now stopped working. Again back on the web, and it appears the keyboard might be the problem...so a replacement has been ordered, so waiting on the keyboard now to do a full replacement..I'll let all know. I am now disappointed in the mac service people, I don't think they even looked deeply into the issue, they did not even clean it. Macs are simply too good to throw away, as a responsible owner I want to try all I can do to fix rather than throw out...stay tuned. PS - extremely happy with the service and products from ifixit....

My Fix

TVA

My Advice

Don't give up

My Problem

Hard Drive crapped out.

My Fix

Awesome... didn't take anymore than about an hour.

My Advice

Many hands make the job so much easier. As well as using the repair guide (which is absolutely perfect) watch some YouTube videos so you're completely familiar with the process.

TAKE YOUR TIME!!!

My Problem

The screen to a iMac G5 20in died. I changing out the power supply, the logic board and even connected it to another moniter but no image. Was going to firewire the computer to my computer and pull off the data but there was no firewire on my computer, so I removed the HD and bought iFix-it's Universal Drive Adapter...that came in a cute zippered carrying case. Sooo Cool!!!

My Fix

I took the HD home and connected it to my Mac laptop using the Universal Drive Adapter. I also connected an external HD to the laptop. When both icons showed I opened them both and started draging and dropping files.

Transfering data, especially pictures, takes a long time. This project took 4 hours...there were a LOT of pictures.

My Advice

What I noticed while transfering the files was that the HD I was transfering files from AND my laptop got real hot. So as to not burn out the two devices I set them both on igloo cooler ice blocks that were wrapped in towels, cuz I didn't have a cooling fan. This kept the two devices cool while I finished the transfer.

My Problem

powerbook g4 died and needed the data from the 2.5" hard drive also needed data from a 3.5" IDE drive

My Fix

the 2.5"went great however, the 3.5" would not spin up. also the blue light on the ifixit power supply would not light up. it did come on for a second but went out. wondering if its because the drive is dead (it did work just last week) any advice?

My Advice

looks like a great product to me. very handy to have. jnust wish the 3.5" drive would work with it.

My Problem

My G5 would not boot after years of good service. I was ready to retire it, but hated to lose the hard drives inside. I was pretty sure all was backed up but wanted to be sure.

My Fix

Your ifixit kit arrived quickly and worked exactly as advertised to rescue both hard drives. Now I have two spare drives for non-critical use. I am thrilled!

My Advice

I was puzzled at first about fitting the right connector to the drive because there is more than one in the box. Take your time and think it through: power supply to drive to USB output.

My Problem

I had ruined the keyboard by trying to clean it with a dampened cloth and Windex. I found out later to use only distilled water, and a minimum of that on a cloth, wrung-out as much as possible.

Since I had to go in to replace the keyboard [from Amazon], I also decided to max out the RAM to 6GB, using iFixit.com 4GB and 2GB chips [2 bays] and install a 128GB Samsung SSD [also from Amazon] in place of the 160GB hard drive to help improve speed.

My Fix

Following the iFixIt.com guide, everything was straightforward except the HD hookup and initialization. No instructions with iFixIt.com Universal Drive Adapter kit, but looking at connectors I was able to figure out how the kit itself went together and how to hook up ESATA SSD power and USB connections.

After hookup to the kit, I partitioned the SSD with Disk Utility, cloned my old drive with Carbon Copy Cloner via USB 2.0 to the new SSD drive and booted from the new SSD before I installed it inside the case.

Mechanical part of repair was relatively easy, except for handling those tiny #00 Phillips screws.

My Advice

1) Use a clean, uncluttered work table, with area for all removed parts - label everything as it comes out.

2) When installing a new drive, use Disk Utility to partition it first, even if you're only going to have 1 partition - otherwise the drive won't be recognized by the Mac OS X.

3) Have a pencil magnet [for those tiny steel screws] and make labeled sandwich bags for each step in the iFixIt.com sequence.

4) When replacing the upper case/keyboard, some of the screw tab holes may not line up perfectly, but you can use an awl or similar to align tabs with holes so the screws can go in.

5) If you're replacing a part with x number of screw holes, don't tighten them all completely until they are all installed and threading in. Then tighten from the center of an area outward, symmetrically, in steps, to spread the compression equally.