T6 Torx Screwdriver

$9.95

Product code: IF145-004

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T6 Torx Screwdriver

$9.95

Product code: IF145-004

Product Overview

There's no substitute for the right tool for the job.

  • Common specialty size used in all sorts of electronics: laptops, cell phones, and tablets.
  • Sturdy precision driver with a solid metal shaft, rubberized plastic handle, and spinning top.
  • Fixed drivers for commonly used screw sizes make a great complement to a 54 Bit Driver Kit for the frequent fixer.
  • Upgrade to pro for an ESD safe professional-grade driver.

Please Note: This driver is a standard T6 and will not work for the 2014 Mac Mini. The correct tool is TR6 Torx Security Screwdriver.

Also available as part of the Pro Tech Screwdriver Set

Product Details

$9.95 Pro / ESD / USA

 
 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Top of the line professional made in USA driver with swivel top ESD safe ergonomic handle.

Lifetime Warranty.

$5.95 iFixit

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Excellent quality driver, great for everyday use and and the occasional repair. A staff favorite!

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Stories

Jeannie Crowley's Story Photo #843700
Jeannie Crowley's Story Photo #843701
Jeannie Crowley's Story Photo #843697

My Problem

We have 70 2012 MacBook Pros, currently used by three 5th grade classes, that were very slow and up for replacement. Rather than buying new devices, the kids decided to "restart" their devices by replacing the original hard drives with new solid state drives.

My Fix

It took a lot of planning (purchasing enough tools, training volunteers, and making sure instructions were accessible for 5th graders), but it went off without a hitch. In 1.5 hours students replaced 36 hard drives, and the remaining hard drives will be replaced during free periods by kids over the next few weeks. The best part of the project is they got to see how much waste they saved by replacing a component of a device rather than the whole device. I absolutely loved hearing kids debrief and talk about the differences between a hard drive and a SSD. They learned about repair, sustainability, and about a technology that not many people their age are familiar with (SSDs).

My Advice

It's a pretty simple repair that is possible even with children. The hardest thing is to keep them from going too fast, but given the success rate I'd say anyone could do this repair.

My Problem

the glass of screen was broken

My Fix

Its go very easy with your help

My Advice

No

My Problem

My Macbook one day wouldn't boot, giving the folder/question mark story. The only way I could get a full boot was by making my internal drive an external. That narrowed the problem to either the HDD cable or the motherboard, I optimistically ordered the cable and started praying.

My Fix

The replacement took less than 5 minutes and afterward my broken computer was once became my trusty Macbook and booted without issue.

My Advice

If my repair has taught me anything: keep digging until you've narrowed it down as much as possible and then start with the cheapest fix.

My Problem

Left fan on a MacBook Pro - was very noisy

My Fix

Perfect /easy - iFixit instructions were fantastic.

My Advice

Check the iFixit list before you just click on the tools they recommend - they should also recommend an anti-static wrist loop. Also use an egg box or daily/weekly pill dispenser to keep all the little screws as you go.

My Problem

Needed to upgrade the SSD drive

My Fix

Great - The iMac runs like it is brand new

My Advice

Pricing and Shipping were hassle-free

My Problem

Left fan runs / stops randomly, and makes big noise!

My Fix

Easy to replace within 10 min.

My Advice

To browse infixit instruction before fixing it. It is hopeful!

My Problem

The mini wasn't broken, but the stock hard drive was of the slow 5400 rpm variety, which made the computer itself very slow when running OS X 10.11. So I wanted to find out if I could replace its hard drive with a speedier SSD, and ifixit had the tools and instructions I needed.

My Fix

The repair went fine. The step-by-step instructions were complete and accurate. They took all the guesswork out of how to disassemble the unit to get to the drive bay. There was a little bit of work getting the new SSD to sit in the mount, but that's down to Apple not making it easy. Other than that, it was pretty straightforward. I swapped the drives, put the mini back together, turned it on and cloned the old drive to the new. The drive swap took about 30 minutes, and the cloning took about six hours.

My Advice

I might add one more step at the very end of the drive replacement instructions that shows removing the SATA adapter from the drive itself, which is needed for connecting the new SSD. But I knew about this detail from swapping out laptop drives in older PowerBooks, so that wasn't a mystery for me. Someone doing this task the first time might not know about this detail.

sorgenfri0's Story Photo #737397

My Problem

Over the years, the 320 GB hard drive in my trusty, late 2008 15" had become noisy, slow - and almost full, so I ordered a 500 GB including the few tools required.

My Fix

The guide was more than sufficient, even for someone with limited experience. The physical exchange of the two drives was very quick. Installing OS X on the new drive was also easy. After restoring from Time machine backup, the old MacBook was again up and running, faster than before.

My Advice

I had forgot to order the adapter from hard drive connector to USB, luckily I had the correct one from an earlier project (the white, not the black, in the picture).

My Problem

The fan had completely quit in my 2012 unibody macbook pro and as a result it was overheating and slowing the cpu to a crawl during taxing graphical work.

My Fix

The new fan fit perfectly and works perfectly and silently. I'm far more confident in its brushless motor to hold up.

My Advice

The fans don't come with hardware, so either save your old ones or have new screws ready if you stripped the old ones like I had.

My Problem

Cracked LCD

My Fix

Success: About 3.5 hours.

Followed 2 iFixit repair guides:

1) Steps 1 - 16 for 17 inch Gloss LCD replacement:

MacBook Pro 17" Unibody LCD Replacement

2) Steps 21+ for 15 inch Matte LCD replacement, for the grey bezel:

MacBook Pro 15" Unibody Mid 2010 Matte LCD Replacement

Remember, the 15 screen internals are different from the 17 when it comes to the other screen parts, so refer back to the 17 guide (or video below) once the bezel is off.

My Advice

Use this extra YouTube video for reference, as it's got instructions on putting back together again:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HLwO1YV5...

However, use this video as a supplemental (e.g. on iPad). Generally follow the iFixit method for disassembly (NB. remove the battery connector, remove the black rubber gasket around the bezel, etc, no need to remove hinges as in video).

Video is more useful for when putting things back together.

Notes:

- I put the black rubber gasket back on first, and then the bezel.

- Putting back the Clutch Cover (step 17, guide 1) can be quite tricky; see on the video it says to put the cable on top of the hinge (of the left), so that the bottom can sit in the body. Have a look at the groves in it to see how they slide left into the screen body.

- My bezel reassembly needs more glue/work; it's not as flush as original.