MacBook Pro 13" Unibody and MacBook 13" Unibody Fan

$24.95

Product code: IF163-022
Apple Part #: 922-8620, 661-5418, 661-9530, 922-9530, 661-4946

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MacBook Pro 13" Unibody and MacBook 13" Unibody Fan

$24.95

Product code: IF163-022
Apple Part #: 922-8620, 661-5418, 661-9530, 922-9530, 661-4946

Product Overview

Is your fan calling for help?

Don't put up with a buzzing, clicking, or loud fan - not only is it an annoyance but you risk overheating and permanently damaging your laptop. Keep everything cool and quiet by replacing your problematic fan before its too late.

Feel confident in your purchase - all of our Used Fans are cosmetically inspected and functionally tested in house. Help extend the life of your computer with a used fan and feel good knowing that you've part of a sustainable economy and have kept a functional part out of the landfill.

Compatibility

Identify your Mac

  • All Mid 2009 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Mid 2010 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Early 2011 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Late 2011 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All Mid 2012 13" Unibody MacBook Pros
  • All 13" Macbook Unibody

Product Details

  • Model: A1278 and A1342

$39.95 New / Black

 
 

Condition:

New

$24.95 Used / Silver

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Housing may show manufacturing and handling marks that do not effect fan performance.

$24.95 Used / Black

 
 

Condition:

Used, fully tested

Add to Cart
 

Install Videos

 

Replacement Guides

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Unibody Model A1278

Difficulty: Moderate

MacBook Unibody Model A1342

Difficulty: Moderate

 

Compatibility

MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Early 2011
2.3 GHz (Early 2011)
2.7 GHz (Early 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Late 2011
2.4 GHz (Late 2011)
2.8 GHz (Late 2011)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2009
2.26 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.53 GHz (Mid 2009)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2010
2.4 GHz (Mid 2010)
2.66 GHz (Mid 2010)
MacBook Pro 13" Unibody Mid 2012
2.5 GHz (Mid 2012)
2.9 GHz (Mid 2012)
MacBook Unibody Model A1278
2 GHz (A1278)
2.4 GHz (A1278)
MacBook Unibody Model A1342
2.26 GHz (A1342)
2.4 GHz (A1342)
 

Stories

My Problem

My MBP has been making this grinding noise that I originally thought was the HDD failing (again). Turned out it was the fan going bad. When I ran a YouTube video my CPU temperature spiked to high 80's and you could hear the fan screaming for mercy. lol :)

My Fix

The most difficult part of the repair was waiting for the product to get to me. Else wise, the repair went off smoothly. I can no longer hear the fan and the CPU is at a cool mid 60s - mid 70s.

My Advice

I don't know that I should suggest this as an "advice". However, when it came to removing the fan from the logic board, I found that if you gently pulled the wire up and away from the port, it is easier to remove. I know, "don't pull wires!". I intended to discard the old fan so I figured that less damage to the logic board, the better.

My Problem

The fan had completely quit in my 2012 unibody macbook pro and as a result it was overheating and slowing the cpu to a crawl during taxing graphical work.

My Fix

The new fan fit perfectly and works perfectly and silently. I'm far more confident in its brushless motor to hold up.

My Advice

The fans don't come with hardware, so either save your old ones or have new screws ready if you stripped the old ones like I had.

My Problem

My fan was making my MacBook sound louder than a blender!

My Fix

Super easy and straight forward.

My Advice

Don't be afraid to make your own repairs. I recently also double the memory sticks on my MacBook and it is now nice and quiet and lightning fast. Having said the, do know your limitations.

My Problem

The fan was noisy, and it sounded like it was on the way out

My Fix

All good until it came to levering the fan connector out with the spudger. Then -- as predicted in the instructions -- disaster! All four pins from the logic board sheared off, firmly in the fan connector. Fortunately my local computer tech is tooled up for this and he installed the replacement fan with a dot of glue and solder. And $100.

My Advice

It is very tight, and I would strongly advise you to think twice before taking this on. Future bold souls could really use a closeup of the fan connector on the motherboard, showing that the pins are at the front and not underneath. Hence your advice to attack it from the back. I'm afraid I was in too much of a spin to take the shot.

My Problem

The fan was beginning to make a screeching racket and the mac case was getting hotter than it ever had before, then it went quiet and made no noise! So after conferring with a friendMacGuru I presumed that at least the fan could do with replacement immediately lest I need to replace the lot imminently!

My Fix

Friend sent link to iFixit page for actual process on actual model computer. I was shocked at the images and detail in text that were there to guide you through the process, in addition to click links for ordering the required part. I placed the order on a Thurs afternoon. The consignment was transported from California USA and delivered to me in Perth on the West Coast of Australia on the following Tuesday morning.

How good is that!?

How could a service possibly be better?!

My Advice

Installation was very easy and straight forward.

It was not clear in the text, for how to get the fan unplugged from the circuit board. After taking photos of the plug and socket then enlarging them, I was able to work out that;

The plug must be removed in direction precisely vertical from the board.

I ended up using a small flat screw driver to prise it upwards from the board (try and use a non conductive version of....?, credit card did not work for me).

When plugging in the new fan, the plug slides down vertically over the recipient socket in the same way that it came off. The 4 line slots that run to edge of plug casing must go face down so as to fit snugly onto the 4 projecting prongs of the circuit board mounted socket. The plug is so small that it is difficult to see which side is the correct one to install face down.

My Problem

The fan in my early 2011 MacBook Pro had been making an unusual noise for a while, but, since my temperature and fan monitoring software seemed to be indicating that it was still functioning normally, I hoped that it was just something caught in the fan and carried on as usual. Then, one night last week, the fan's symptoms graduated from "extra noise" to "laptop seems to be in the process of shaking itself to pieces". I saved, quit, shutdown, and opened up the back to see if I could clean the inside (pretty much the extent of my hardware repair experience at the time). I powered the computer back up... and then quickly shut it down again, as the vibration seemed, if anything, worse.

My Fix

My first thought was to look for an Apple Store. One was found, but the soonest bus to it wouldn't be for hours. As I expected that they'd take time and money I'd rather not spend, I looked for other options. I found a local repair shop that might have been able to do it, but that was a bit of a walk away and might not have been able to do it much sooner or more cheaply than the Apple Store. I [i]did[/i] consider repairing it myself, but, after all, I thought, then I'd probably have to wait even longer for a new fan to arrive; the shops might at least already have one in stock. Then I also remembered that my landlord had an old and nonfunctional MacBook Pro down in the basement workshop. I checked it and found, happily, that it was the same model as mine (though, as I later found out, a late 2012 one). The idea of repairing my own computer now seemed more feasible. I checked with my landlord and found that the computer had failed due to a software problem; sure enough, the fan ought to be fine. The workshop also had, I thought, all the tools I would need, and I already had a screwdriver that could take the back of my computer off. There was only one complication (at this stage): my landlord hoped to get the laptop up and running again at [i]some[/i] point, so just leaving it with a hole where the fan should be wasn't acceptable. That's where the order that lead to this repair came in. That day (after a bit of an adventure, which is something of another story, trying to find a spudger), I opened up both computers, took out both fans, and put the working fan in my laptop (after a few moments of concerned research when it turned out that the fans were from different manufacturers). The backs went back on (along with, on the donor computer, a label warning of the lack of a fan), the moment of truth came... and my laptop powered up beautifully smooth and quietly, with the monitoring software indicating a nice cool idle. My first big repair wen off without a hitch... at least in the actual repair process.

I've not put the new fan in the old laptop yet, but, since I don't expect difficulty with that after my earlier success and, more to the point, being unsure when I'll be able to see if that installation worked (due to the aforementioned software problems), I thought I'd type this story up now.

My Advice

Before starting this, I was [i]tremendously[/i] intimidated. Me? Such an amateur, open up my precious laptop and actually fiddle about with the screws and plugs inside? Surely I'd slip at the wrong moment and let out all the magic smoke the computer gnomes use to do their miraculous work! Well, that didn't happen. I followed Ifixit's instructions, and, once I had the proper tools (the workshop has a nice set of Ifixit screwdrivers, among other tools, but the Quest for the Spudger...), the repair went tremendously easily. And this was, as I recall, listed as being of moderate difficulty. While I naturally hope that my electronics don't break, I now feel a lot more confident about my ability to at least not irreparably damage them by looking at the insides the wrong way. And, of course, my laptop was back up and running in less than two days, without ever being let out of my possession and with the monetary cost being only that of the new fan (and the spudger; I know I keep bringing that up, but, for a rod of plastic with a flat bit on the end, it was surprisingly difficult to find). So, the advice, I suppose... don't be afraid to open your technology up just because you're pretty much a total amateur. Do your research, certainly, and be careful, but this sort of thing really can be done without lots of prior experience or the appropriate corporate nametag.

My Problem

The cooling fan on my 13" MacBook was failing. It was making a lot of noise and sounded awful.

My Fix

The repair was easy and straight forward. The step by step instructions with detailed pictures were easy to follow and informative.

My Advice

The case screws needed a lot of pressure to remove. I'm glad I bought the quality screw driver with it.

My Problem

So back in 2011 my fan broke and jammed and told myself i will fix it in a week. Now it's 2015 and I now have a over heating computer problem

My Fix

It is very easy to do, if you can't do this simple repair then i don't know what you wrong.

My Advice

Make sure you buy the second screwdriver because the fan screw itself are diffent then the bottom cover ones.

My Problem

The fan bearings were bad, you could hear it making an awful sound. Since I had replaced the HDD already with an SSD, I knew it had to be the fan.

My Fix

With the help of Ifixit.com, it went smoothly, in 5-10 mins. What a great resource you guys are, and thank you!

My Advice

Just have a computer with the guide open, to make it easier. But very very easy to replace the fan.

My Problem

My partners late 2009 Macbook started to fall apart all at once. The rubberised bottom peeled off, the batter stopped holding a charge and the fan failed.

I replaced the laptop with a new macbook and kept the old one until it failed completely which was the day after it was replaced.

A year later and I was going through all my old gear and found the Macbook and thought it would be a good exercise to fix it.

My Fix

The repair took all of 35 mins with the new toolkit I purchased with the replacement parts.

Once everything was is place the Macbook, to my surprise, booted like it was brand new and is now my main 'nix box.

My Advice

Just because it is broken it doesn't mean it can't be fixed ...and get the pro toolkit for the repair!!