Introduction

Use this guide to replace the cracked or broken screen on your iPhone 5s by swapping out the display assembly.

This guide will help you remove the screen and the home button for transfer to the new part. This guide does not include the removal of the front-facing camera and sensor cable, or the earpiece speaker. If your part does not have these components, follow the more in-depth front panel guide.

In either case, it's important to transfer the original home button onto the new display in order for Touch ID (fingerprint scanning) to function.

Video Overview

If your display glass is cracked, keep further breakage contained and prevent bodily harm during your repair by taping the glass. Lay overlapping strips of clear packing tape over the iPhone's display until the whole face is covered. This will keep glass shards contained and provide structural integrity when prying and lifting the display.
  • If your display glass is cracked, keep further breakage contained and prevent bodily harm during your repair by taping the glass.

  • Lay overlapping strips of clear packing tape over the iPhone's display until the whole face is covered.

    • This will keep glass shards contained and provide structural integrity when prying and lifting the display.

  • Wear safety glasses to protect your eyes from any glass shaken free during the repair.

This was the most stressful thing I have ever done. I can't get the chips to pop in the top right corner, still coming up with white lines at top of screen even after re-powering the battery. Very poor experience, will let apple or a professional handle this rather than a how to. &&^& this.

steven krieger - Reply

This is a Step 4 comment. I ordered the iSclack tool to help with my 5s battery replacement. After 30 minutes of trying to open the iPhone, I gave up and will try this later when I have a lot more time to spend on this. Before you ask, yes I did remove the two screws in Step 2. I must have a very tight fitting phone! Maybe next time I'll try a drop of oil on both suction cups to help with the adhesion. LOL, did not think I'd have trouble opening the case!

TerryChang - Reply

An update. After months of living with my dead battery (iSclack would not work for me), I decided to use the provided suction cup, and surprise - it worked! LOL, so much for the iSclack tool! In any case, I followed the instructions and though it was a bit difficult (too small parts, too fat fingers, aging eyes), I was able to replace the battery. The battery removal was a bear, but with patience (and the use of an expired credit card as my lever), it did come out. Replacement of the adhesive strips was a puzzle - I eventually installed it "backwards" (removal hole in the tab on the left vs right) but this should not affect anything. Phone is charging now and preliminary testing of the home button/digitizer seem to be working. Once fully charged I'll do a full test on the phone to ensure I put things together correctly, but THANK YOU iFixIt for these instructions!

TerryChang -

I faced the same issue. My 5S wouldn't open with the iSclack. Had to use the suction cup instead. Even then, I wrestled with it for a whole 30 minutes.. Apparently my 5S is one sticky beast.

Daylen -

Firstly do not just watch the video if you are going to do the battery replacement. I was too busy and stupid and only watched the video and boogered my Girlfiends 5S with the screw replacement boon doggle... You must read the iFix full instructions (forget the video) or you will screw it up!.. It is not necessary to take the screen completely off. I did my 5 that was and assumed the 5S had a different protocol for a reason. It doesn't require removing the creen at all. I was careful on my 5 and had no problem. I took different prcautions and watched only the video and screwed up a perfectly good 5S... This means if your not backed up you just lost all your contacts and messages videos etc.... iFix is cool except their Video is not concise like the long instructions they provide. I was stupid and figured I new what i was doing after doing a couple other batteries and bingo I screwed it...

yaterbob - Reply

Before embarking on this task, be sure you don't simply have built-up lint in the lightening port. I found that with a needle and some very CAREFUL workmanship removing lint/debris from the base of the port was what was ailing my machine.

mark40 - Reply

Before you proceed, discharge your iPhone battery below 25%. A charged lithium-ion battery can catch fire and/or explode if accidentally punctured.
  • Before you proceed, discharge your iPhone battery below 25%. A charged lithium-ion battery can catch fire and/or explode if accidentally punctured.

  • Power off your iPhone before beginning disassembly.

  • Remove the two 3.9 mm Pentalobe screws from either side of Lightning connector.

I used a white terrycloth hand towel as my work surface and to position and retain all the screws and part in their relative positions, so I didn't mix things up. I also magnetized the screwdriver tips and that made it very easy to deal with these tiny, tiny screws.

Magnus Dalen - Reply

For a secure working, put a small pot with lid on your workplace. When the battery starts burning, throw it in the pot, close it with the lid and get the pot safely out of the building, e.g. on the balcony or throw it out of the window. Do not try to extinct the battery with water, just let it burn out outside. This might take some hours.

Raymond Willems - Reply

In the following steps you will be pulling the display up out of the phone body. The display is composed of a glass screen and a plastic bezel with metal clips. Regardless of the tool you use, you need to be sure you pull up the entire display. If the glass begins to separate from the plastic, as shown in the first image, slide a plastic opening tool between the plastic frame and the metal phone body to pry the metal clips out of the case.
  • In the following steps you will be pulling the display up out of the phone body. The display is composed of a glass screen and a plastic bezel with metal clips.

  • Regardless of the tool you use, you need to be sure you pull up the entire display.

  • If the glass begins to separate from the plastic, as shown in the first image, slide a plastic opening tool between the plastic frame and the metal phone body to pry the metal clips out of the case.

  • If you are reassembling a phone with a separated display bezel, you may want to place a thin strip of adhesive between the plastic bezel and the glass to keep the phone closed.

can this separation makes the screen stop working

bassam_shallak92 - Reply

In my experience, dust particles have entered the screen, and partially ruins the wiewing experience, but this far the screen still works

Iver søbakk -

If the screen spilt and half is still stuck in the phone (clips broke and came out), how do I get the rest of the display panel up? It appears stuck, almost glued down.

Shara Nelson - Reply

  • The next two steps demonstrate using the iSclack, a great tool for safely opening the iPhone that we recommend for anyone doing more than one repair. If you aren't using the iSclack, skip the next two steps.

  • Close the handle on the iSclack, opening the suction-cup jaws.

  • Place the bottom of your iPhone in between the suction cups, against the plastic depth gauge.

    • The top suction cup should rest just above the home button.

  • Open the handles to close the jaws of the iSclack. Center the suction cups and press them firmly onto the top and bottom of the iPhone.

DO NOT USE THIS METHOD. If the glue holding the glass to the screen assembly is weak, the force from the suction cup will pull the glass straight off. Instead, use a very thin flat metal tool to slide under the front face (carefully between the plastic edge strip and the metal case) and pry up. This is not only easier, but it is also a far safer method.

Izaac Post - Reply

Thank you very much, however already used the suction cup and it came much easier than expected... Then snapped the home cable on my wife's phone... Now I have to replace that...

Thomas Hallberg -

This tool is worth its weight in gold to make opening the case without breaking things very easy. Highly recommend using it. I needed to use the little blue plastic pry bar tool on one side of the case to get the glass and frame to release from the back.

Magnus Dalen - Reply

I used this tool on 2 successful screen replacements - BUT on the third time, the force did in fact separate the glass from the plastic, so I'd suggest inspecting first, and using with care.

Andrew - Reply

This is the third repair using the iSclack it didn't have enough force to lift the face. I used the flat tool to help separate it. Thanks to those who warned against this tool due to pulling the glass face loose. I didn't think of that.

ldavis - Reply

Hold onto your iPhone securely and close the handle of the iSclack to separate the suction cups, pulling the front panel up from the rear case. The iSclack is designed to safely open your iPhone just enough to separate the pieces, but not enough to damage the home button cable.
  • Hold onto your iPhone securely and close the handle of the iSclack to separate the suction cups, pulling the front panel up from the rear case.

  • The iSclack is designed to safely open your iPhone just enough to separate the pieces, but not enough to damage the home button cable.

  • Peel the two suction cups off your iPhone.

  • Skip the next three steps and continue on Step 9.

Add Comment

If you don't have an iSclack, use a single suction cup to lift the front panel:
  • If you don't have an iSclack, use a single suction cup to lift the front panel:

  • Press a suction cup onto the screen, just above the home button.

  • Be sure the cup is completely on the screen to get a tight seal.

My phone was too shattered to grip with my "Pump'itup" iFixit suction cup, and the method of adding packing tape over the display did not work either (still too lumpy). I ended up epoxying two 5" x 3/4" pieces of wood trim strips directly to the face of the phone, avoiding the Home switch and any seams, and positioning the wood to overhang the phone by ~2 inches. After 30 minutes of setting, I was able to lift up on the overhanging wood strips and pop the face of the phone out of the housing.

cpwittenberg - Reply

Use a Stanley knife to push in between the back housing and the frame in the bottom left and corner and gently leaver up.

Much easier Than using suction cup but may slight scratch the frame or housing.

Craig Matthews -

I suspect that the age of the phone and accident that caused cracks make this method possible for some people. My mom's phone was only a month or so old and the suction cup only caused the screen to raise slightly. There was certainly no crack I could squeeze a spudger into. I just superglued the suction cup onto the screen in the end, which was very effective.

Caroline Russell -

Removed board. I ended up with a small shiny metal plate. Shown clearly in the above last posted photos just under the power button switch. Where does this goes?

Malcolm - Reply

I was wondering the same thing. Did you ever figure out where this goes?

paul -

This has probably been replied to, but see step 31 :) Should be re installed with the pokey out bits pointing down.

daveoline -

Can someone please help me. I went through all of the steps and now my phone screen is all white and I can't see anything.

Lukeapple1414 - Reply

First try a hard reset by holding down both the power button and the home button at the same time for at least 10 seconds. If that doesn't work, get back inside the phone and reseat the connectors. If the problem persists, either you received a bad part, or the part was damaged during installation.

iGuys -

My screen was too broken and the suction cup would not stick. I too a piece of Gorilla duct-tape and stuck it to itself and then also to the screen so that it made a "Tab" that I could pull up on. This worked much better than the suction cup.

Nathan - Reply

@malcom @paul if you are referring to step 31 the plate needs to be placed as it comes out on the picture. Long flat part towards the top of the casing with the tab facing the right.

hari - Reply

In my case, i found it easier to remove the sim - not sure if this was a placebo effect, but there you go!

also, there is a rubber seal around the screen - my experience is it should stay of the display, not on the main body.

Robert Colvin - Reply

The amount of force I applied to open the case using the suction cup manually ended up tearing out the home button cable...ripping it in the process. Goodbye TouchID...see you next generation T_T

I would definitely recommend buying a stupid iSclack. I don't know why they'd even present the suction cup as an option. Maybe the 5S opens more easily when it's new. Now I need to decide between dropping more money on a new home button (and iSclack this time) or just hold out with the software home button.

johnsonjohnr - Reply

Just lift slightly using the suction cup and on the bottom edge of the screen over to the left you'll see a slight gap open up just enough to get the spudger in. Don't use the suction cup to release the entire display assembly, just work around the edge with a spudger. This also helps clear some of the dirt build up.

daveoline -

I too tried the suction cup - worthless on cracked an only pulled off the many layers of packing tape applied as suggested. Used edge of utility knife to pry it up, then helper placed another blade underneath until I could pry it open. Great suggestion I read elsewhere, and only way I could get cover off.

I too skipped step 25. Definitely requires patience! Screen replacement was successful, but noticeable degradation in screen clarity/color from the original is somewhat disappointing. At half the price of OEM repair, would probably do it again though.

matttaylor - Reply

If other people have this issue, I would try supergluing a screen protector over the old screen - leave a wide margin around the edges, home key, ear speaker. You could even just cut a piece of the protector into a square, or get a rectangle of shipping tape, the glued down portion needn't cover the whole screen. Then, glue the suction cup on top of the glued down screen protector or tape. I suggest this over the utility knife because it seems like the knife method would at the very least scratch up and nick the frame.

Caroline Russell -

i did this now i'm having a hard time putting the metal bracket back on :(

sineglabs - Reply

1) Set suction cup off-center & pry up a corner instead of trying to yank open the whole thing. Wrap fingers around the entire phone while pulling so you don't inadvertently pull the display too far off.

2) Use a spudger, credit card, or guitar pick to pry it up once you have enough room to do so - don't pull any more than necessary.

3) There's a thin rubber edge around the entire display that might separate & stick to the bottom section. It should stay with the phone.

4) Reassembly: There are small plastic tabs on the top edge that you need to properly reseat in order to fully close the phone.

seijihuzz01 - Reply

We got this to work. Some patience required, but absolutely doable. Our new iFixit suction cup did nothing, but a random one around the house worked fine. Just be patient and work it gently up, this use an opening tool or exacto blade to get into the seem once it comes up. Really quite doable. I'm glad I didn't spend 25 bucks on the fancy tool (a must for repeat use, I'm sure). But don't be deterred by the negatives above. Just go slow.

Chris Twomey - Reply

The front panel is attached with clips, and there are several ribbon cables connecting it to the rest of the phone. Your goal here is to release the clips and open the phone only enough to disconnect the cables. Go slowly and carefully to avoid damage.
  • The front panel is attached with clips, and there are several ribbon cables connecting it to the rest of the phone. Your goal here is to release the clips and open the phone only enough to disconnect the cables. Go slowly and carefully to avoid damage.

  • Make sure the suction cup is firmly attached to the front panel assembly near the home button.

  • While holding the iPhone down with one hand, pull up on the suction cup to slightly separate the home button end of the front panel from the rear case.

  • With a plastic opening tool, gently pry the edges of the rear case down, away from the front panel assembly, while you pull up with the suction cup.

  • Take your time and apply firm, constant force. The 5s front panel assembly is a much tighter fit than most devices.

Seriously consider the isclack. I have a lot of experience working with much more valuable equipment than a phone, and I had read all the precautions... but I broke the cable anyways. The isclack is specifically designed to open the phone but only wide enough to get the clips out, while saving your home button cable.

llcoreyll - Reply

Agreed. The suction cup method shouldn't be mentioned. I'm also extremely delicate with electronics and gently opening the display with a single suction cup is essentially impossible. The spudger needs to do all the work.

idmadj -

It may help to position the suction cup off-center and pull up one corner first.

Rosemary McNaughton - Reply

Yes, I had problems initially (with the suction cup placed just above the home button) but placing it in the left corner did the trick.

Brian Riess -

Avoid spudgers, guitar picks, and other weird inventions, just use your fingernails. That way you can feel what's happening, and you won't accidentally slide them in and break something. They won't break the plastic rim thingy either, in contrast with spudgers. That's what fingernails evolved to do, so just use them.

Konrad Tlatlik - Reply

Lol. Evolved fingernails to open phones.

Chal Miller -

Wrap a zip-tie loosely around the phone to avoid pulling the cover too far off and breaking the ribbon cable.

Thor Lancaster - Reply

Thank you for the zip tie suggestion!

W Fleming -

Zip tie is a brilliant suggestion. Very robust and safe way to pull the phone apart--I had mine wrapped just above the home button and kept the case from opening beyond about 1/8 of an inch.

bartonh - Reply

Used the suction cup and only my screen came up. Looks as though the screen delaminated from its black aluminum mounting tray. The home button stayed with the tray as well. Any ideas?

Kyle Rogers - Reply

I got the battery and fitting kit from ifixit. the blue plastic levers that were included were not up to the job as the blade just bent when any pressure was applied. carefully using my own screwdrivers completed the task.

adrt - Reply

We disagree with the naysayers. Patient use of the suction cup worked for us. The iFixit one didn't do it (it looked a bit deformed out of the box. But a random kids toy worked fine. Nothing fancy. Don't rush. Use an exacto as it starts to come up to slide in to the crevice. After that, works pretty well.

Chris Twomey - Reply

The Jimmy tool worked for me. Managed to slide it in and twist slightly to pop the screen off without too much force.

leeprobert - Reply

ifixit's sucktion cup and blue opening tool worked very well for me. I used the suction cup just enough to get the opening tool into a gap and gently pry out the clips. I'm glad that the display didn't give way too easily otherwise I might have damaged a cable. I wish I had read the zip tie comment first though.

Scott Watson - Reply

ifixit's suction cup and blue opening tool worked well for me. Like the zip tie suggestion as a precaution.

Erik Osborn - Reply

during reassembly, screen cracked worse than screen i was replacing!!

Valerie Egan - Reply

I also broke the screen (after replacing the battery). When closing up the screen, insert the top of the screen first, then lay the phone face down on a flat surface and apply pressure from the back of the phone. It worked for me…

stopsurfing - Reply

This is a great idea! Works for me too!

JC Alice -

Do not try to completely remove the front panel assembly from the rear case, as there are several delicate ribbon cables connecting them. Pull the plastic nub to release the vacuum seal on the suction cup.
  • Do not try to completely remove the front panel assembly from the rear case, as there are several delicate ribbon cables connecting them.

  • Pull the plastic nub to release the vacuum seal on the suction cup.

  • Remove the suction cup from the display assembly.

Cracked my screen using the supplied suction cup. Had to apply clear packing tape to screen to very patiently finish the job. However, now I need a new screen. How nice :-(

Scott Stathis - Reply

Open the phone just enough to reveal the metal bracket covering the home button cable. Do not open the phone too far or you risk damaging the home button cable, or the socket it plugs into. Keep the cable loose—if it is stretched taut, that's too far. Only the phone's original home button assembly will be capable of using the Touch ID functionality. If you rip the cable, installing a new home button will only restore ordinary home button functions, not the Touch ID features.
  • Open the phone just enough to reveal the metal bracket covering the home button cable.

  • Do not open the phone too far or you risk damaging the home button cable, or the socket it plugs into. Keep the cable loose—if it is stretched taut, that's too far.

    • Only the phone's original home button assembly will be capable of using the Touch ID functionality. If you rip the cable, installing a new home button will only restore ordinary home button functions, not the Touch ID features.

  • Use the tip of a spudger to push the bracket free and remove it with tweezers.

  • The next two steps apply to reassembly. Skip them and continue to Step 12 until reassembly.

I had put some what more pressure to suck and sensor cable got detached from upper part(display) , now what shall i do , how to fix it ?

Nikunj - Reply

Is the touch ID bracket really important or have any use ? I forgot to put it back… Is it going to malfunction ?

John Doe - Reply

mine did not appear to have a bracket.. I am wondering too if this is going to mess with it?

Donna Godfrey -

It's there to keep it firmly in place.

Didier Daniel -

Mine also doesn't seem to have a bracket. Plus the cable unclipped itself when the screen shot free - yikes. Looks OK though. I guess I'll find out soon enough.

Gabe - Reply

I wrapped a velcro tie loosely around the phone so it wouldn't open up too far. (or could use a zip tie) Then while holding the screen down with one hand, I pulled the suction cup up with the other hand, using gradual pressure. while using a "wiggeling" upward pressure, I concentrated on raising the left side of the screen, which gradually started to loosen up. then I concentrated on the lower left corner until I had enough of a gap to work in the the flat surface of the plastic tool. I then pried on this corner. The screen then popped up without stressing the home button cable.

Harry

Harry Jones - Reply

I found that when replacing the plate/cover, a pair of needle nosed tweezers held the plate by the 2 holes rather than by the edges (it jumped out repeatedly). I have taken a picture but need to upload it if its required? I also found that taking the new battery out of it's wrapper once out the box has to be done very carefully as the ribbon cable caught on the wrapper so be warned...

andy - Reply

DITCH THE BRACKET! It's unnecessary, as the cable will never come loose under ordinary use. The bracket is also a danger in that if you open the case too far, the TouchID cable could break; without the bracket the cable will detach. Finally, reattaching that bracket is a nightmare. My wife, who drops her phone a lot and requires several new screens a year, has never had her bracket-free cable come lose.

Max Powers - Reply

You say you have to use the original home button. But what is the button "bound" to? The motherboard?

Iver søbakk - Reply

When I lifted my screen during this step, the metal LCD shield plate did not come out with the screen. Very confusing. I needed to carefully pry around the shield plate's side notches, just inside the walls of the iPhone's back, in order to lift it out. Required a trifle bit more force than I anticipated.

Zac Imboden - Reply

I’m already limited to using a touch screen home button. (physical home button stopped responding but fingerprint works) Would this take away that functionality of my on screen home button? does this affect the fingerprint security feature?

Kris704 - Reply

I used the 5S battery kit that iFixit shipped me and attached the suction cup to the screen and gently started pulling to lift the screen. It lifted revealing a very slight crack and I used the spudger tool with the suction cup still lifting away gently and it opened more. At no point did I see any home button cable???

When the screen came off more I continued to follow all the other instructions and have got to step 23 … I see no battery adhesive tab???

Just loads of black electrical tape blending in with the battery seal. So now I have no clue how to complete taking the battery out?

Completely bummed at this point….

Alun Williams - Reply

During reassembly, you will need to reinstall the Touch ID cable bracket. The top of the bracket needs to slide between the battery and Touch ID cable connector, and the front must latch down over the connector. Slide the top of the bracket over the Touch ID cable connector from left to right.
  • During reassembly, you will need to reinstall the Touch ID cable bracket. The top of the bracket needs to slide between the battery and Touch ID cable connector, and the front must latch down over the connector.

  • Slide the top of the bracket over the Touch ID cable connector from left to right.

This is the hardest part lol

Bob smith - Reply

I concur! I think I need thinner tweezers.

FierDancr -

1) Reassembly: Note the orientation, 2 clips toward the battery, 1 clip toward the bottom of the phone. Mine didn't "latch down" or stay in place - it just sort of sat there.

2) Note that the rest of the bracket this attaches to must be removed from the Lightning Connector assembly & reattached to the new one.

3) I combined this repair w/replacing the battery, and smashed the bottom of the bracket under the battery/adhesive strips. Careful not to do that, so that you can actually complete this step.

seijihuzz01 - Reply

Comment above was made on the Lightning Connector replacement guide - I guess it got pulled over here since as well since the steps are identical ... Anyway careful not to smash the bottom bracket w/the replacement battery or adhesive

seijihuzz01 - Reply

That was fun without tweezers :)

olichtarski - Reply

Even with tweezers (the eyebrow kind) it was still an exercise in extreme calming techniques. I nearly gave up, but after 20 minutes I finally got it to seat and clamp.

natzulf -

It is fiddly and access is tight as all the connectors are in place. However, if you approach at the correct angle so that you are looking to latch the connector next to the battery first... Once this is in place and secure then gently push down the front of the bracket over the cable.

copeconsultancy - Reply

I think it's the pics and the word 'slide' that throws people off. I tried this around 20 times to 'slide' it on from the left side, and was getting frustrated. My friend came over, laid the cover on the top, and just snapped it down into place. Still the guide had this down for me in 30 minutes even with the 'hardest part' haha and the part from ifixit worked and looked perfect.

Brent Hillyer - Reply

DITCH THE BRACKET! It's unnecessary, as the cable will never come loose under ordinary use. The bracket is also a danger in that if you open the case too far, the TouchID cable could break; without the bracket the cable will detach. Finally, reattaching that bracket is a nightmare. My wife, who drops her phone a lot and requires several new screens a year, has never had her bracket-free cable come lose.

Max Powers - Reply

Not everyone should ditch the bracket just because you did. The bracket is there to keep everything firmly in place.

Didier Daniel -

On an old 5S, the metal retainer bracket snapped in easily. There was no sliding, the rear edge dropped in straight, it hinged down, and locked almost before I knew it. The lack of a click or any positive feel on this critical connector surprised me a lot. I had to eyeball it with a magnifier to feel sure the ribbon connector was really in its socket. Works perfectly after the replacement, though.

Jeff Clayton - Reply

All this time I was trying to put the bracket right next to the battery but that's not right. There's no way the bumps on the metal connector can fit in the slots on the bracket. It's battery, metal connector and then the bracket. So easy. Next time I dismantle an iPhone 5S I won't be dreading this step.

Kim Mace - Reply

Use the flat end of a spudger to snap the front portion of the Touch ID cable bracket down over the cable connector. If the bracket does not snap down flush, you may need to remove the bracket and slide it over the cable connector again for a better fit.
  • Use the flat end of a spudger to snap the front portion of the Touch ID cable bracket down over the cable connector.

  • If the bracket does not snap down flush, you may need to remove the bracket and slide it over the cable connector again for a better fit.

It seems like a couple of these steps are reassembly steps? I wish they would label them as such. This step and step 10 are for reassembly, and it's confusing.

Sheldon Carpenter - Reply

See the information line on Step 9 that says this exact thing?

Elliot Fleming - Reply

Use the tip of a spudger to pry the home button cable connector up out of its socket. Be sure you're separating the cable connector from its socket, and not prying the entire socket up. The socket is on its own glued-down cable that can be pried up if you aren't careful.
  • Use the tip of a spudger to pry the home button cable connector up out of its socket.

  • Be sure you're separating the cable connector from its socket, and not prying the entire socket up. The socket is on its own glued-down cable that can be pried up if you aren't careful.

Upon reassembly, I found this easier once I was looking at the connection from the bottom of the phone, as pictured. I had been trying to line up the connector from the side. Once I put on magnifying glasses and had really good light, I lined it up and slipped my finger in for the click.

Oh, in a moment of relief after getting the cable connected, I quickly closed up the phone, forgetting to put the metal bracket covering the home button cable back on. I had to re-open the case. Don't be like me!

Keystone - Reply

Reassembly:

The original part bends the bottom home button connector back on itself into a bracket you have to remove (not mentioned in later steps).

That bracket has a bit of adhesive to keep the bottom connector in place.

The replacement part does not come with a bracket, or additional adhesive, so the bottom connector flops around & can make reassembly a challenge. I found it was best to hold right edge of the bottom in place w/1 finger, and use a 2nd finger to slide the upper cable connector left to right and click it into place.

seijihuzz01 - Reply

Also worth mentioning is that upon reassembly, make sure that the home button cable folds to the left (away from the side with the SIM card) as the front panel will not fit properly otherwise.

Brian Riess - Reply

Once the connector has been released, pull the home button end of the assembly away from the rear case, using the top of the phone as a hinge. Open the display to about a 90º angle, and lean it against something to keep it propped up while you're working on the phone. Add a rubber band to keep the display securely in place while you work. This prevents undue strain on the display cables.
  • Once the connector has been released, pull the home button end of the assembly away from the rear case, using the top of the phone as a hinge.

  • Open the display to about a 90º angle, and lean it against something to keep it propped up while you're working on the phone.

    • Add a rubber band to keep the display securely in place while you work. This prevents undue strain on the display cables.

    • In a pinch, you can use an unopened canned beverage to hold the display.

maak een constructie waar de iPhone in valt en waarbij het scherm in een hoek van 90 graden kan worden gefixeerd, dan hoef je drie kabeltjes niet los te maken. Is mij heel goed gelukt .

Joop Roos - Reply

Remove the two 1.6 mm Phillips #000 screws securing the metal battery connector bracket to the logic board.
  • Remove the two 1.6 mm Phillips #000 screws securing the metal battery connector bracket to the logic board.

I don't see why steps 14, 15, and 16 are even necessary. I was able to remove the scene without removing the battery (skipping these 3 steps)

Luke Lin - Reply

See Jonathan Goldsmith's comment ;)

Didier Daniel -

Working on the phone without removing the battery will most likely damage the component. My OnePlus One runs extremely slow after working on it without removing the battery. I think it's a problem with the GPU, because the display was very slow to update the screen contents.

Peter Pan - Reply

Pan is right. Not removing the battery means you will run the risk of shorting some circuits not meant to be connected, and thus can damage those components. This can happen very easily, and without you even knowing it. Additionally, the internal components of a digital device are not meant to be disconnected while having any amount of power applied(and even though your device may not even turn on because the battery is completely shot, there very likely will still be a small amount of power coming from the battery to the internal components of the device). Doing so will likely cause an overcurrent condition that will damage the components of the device.

Jonathan Goldsmith - Reply

Now my problem, however, is that the screws on this bracket do not seem to want to unscrew. :(

Jonathan Goldsmith - Reply

Okay, the problem would seem to have been with the screwdriver that came with my iFixit battery "Fix kit". Tried another screwdriver, and no problems at all.

Jonathan Goldsmith - Reply

Phillips #000 provided with the iFixit repair kit does not fit the screws

Vitaly Kirichenko - Reply

I agree the #000 Phillips driver didn't work. I happened to already have a #0 Phillips that did work much better.

Bruce Peffley -

The screwdriver that came with the kit worked fine for me when I applied pressure with my palm to the end of the driver and turned the driver with my forefinger and thumb

Tom Gleason - Reply

The ifixit #000 works…if you put an uncomfortable amount of pressure on the driver. Yikes. Use a larger bit if you’ve got it.

Chris Wiley - Reply

Remove the metal battery connector bracket from the iPhone.
  • Remove the metal battery connector bracket from the iPhone.

Not clear to me why this and the next step are necessary for a screen replacement...

Daniel Goldschmidt - Reply

Using the iFixit tweezers to remove the bracket caused a spark. I used the plastic spudger instead.

Bryan Remely - Reply

Use the flat end of a spudger to gently pry the battery connector up from its socket on the logic board. Be very careful to only pry up on the battery connector itself and not the socket on the logic board. If you pry up on the logic board socket, you may break the connector entirely.
  • Use the flat end of a spudger to gently pry the battery connector up from its socket on the logic board.

  • Be very careful to only pry up on the battery connector itself and not the socket on the logic board. If you pry up on the logic board socket, you may break the connector entirely.

pourquoi faire?

Alexis Camper - Reply

Skip steps17-22. Just be extra careful and secure the screen. Less to go wrong the less you open.

William Stein - Reply

Also order the headband magnifier. It really helps with the tiny components you are working with.

William Stein - Reply

Remove the following screws securing the front panel assembly cable bracket to the logic board:
  • Remove the following screws securing the front panel assembly cable bracket to the logic board:

    • One 1.7 mm Phillips #000 screw

    • One 1.2 mm Phillips #000 screw

    • One 1.3 mm Phillips #000 screw

    • One more 1.7 mm Phillips #000 screw

      • This 1.7 mm screw tends to not be attracted to a magnetized screwdriver. Take care not to lose it when removing.

    • It is especially important to keep track of your screws in this step for reassembly. Accidentally using the 1.3 mm screw or one of the 1.7 mm screws in the bottom right hole will result in significant damage to the logic board causing the phone to no longer boot properly.

      • Be careful not to over-tighten the screws, and don't force them. If they don't fit easily when you are securing them, they may be the wrong size.

Two screws at the bottom should be the most short, two screws on top are the longest, you got it wrong.Please official verification again, and reply to me. Thank you!

CLAUDE - Reply

Hi Claude,

Unfortunately I forgot to check at dis-assembly which screw goes back where at step 11 so I ended up following the instructions although, I would find it logical that the longer screws are for the top and the shorter ones for the bottom holes, which is what you mentioned also . I anyway ended up following the instructions and all went well except that I am now unable to hear anything while in a phone call connected to the Bluetooth in my car. The phone connects, I have the battery and network status on the screen of my car, I can receive SMS on the car's screen, I can stream music to the speakers but I cannot hear anything while in a call. I can hear the call ringing in the car speakers, I can answer it but after that it's silent.

So, I was wondering:

1. Did you hear back on your comment from iFixit?

2. Did you install the screws back the way you mentioned in your comment? Did it work?

3. Did you check / note down the position of the screws at dis-assembly?

Thanks in advance.

Regards,

Cornel.

corneliumusat -

so these are wrong?:

http://www.iphonebits.co.uk/wp-content/u...

https://blogetechparts.files.wordpress.c...

As they suggest the long screws go on the left...

holvoetsteve -

Can anyone answer if the blue strips on the crews indicate which screws they are? They are all so small it's hard to find the right lengths for each hole

Ariel Drotter -

Does anyone know if the blue strips on the screws indicate their length? I'm finding it very hard to distinguish the lengths

Ariel Drotter -

@Ariel - The blue that you are seeing on the screws is simply leftover loctite compound that is used to prevent the screws from working their way loose during every day use and does not give any indication as to the length of the screw. You should notice that, generally, you have two lengths of screws out of the 4 that came out...2 with longer threads and two with shorter threads. The two with shorter threads need to go in the bottom two holes...these two screws are not exactly the same length (difference of 0.1 mm), but mixing them up should not cause any harm to the phone due to such a small difference. With the two longer ones that are leftover, only one of them will be magnetically attracted to your screwdriver...this is the one that goes in the top left hole. The one that does not easily attract to your screwdriver goes in the top right.

iGuys -

Hi Everyone,

Claude is right, after re-arranging the screws so that the top two are the longest, bottom-right shortest and bottom left is the second-shortest the in-call audio came back with Bluetooth calls.

The same was found and posted by Pete on the Apple Support Communities forums and, as mentioned, I can also confirm that this fix works.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Cornel.

corneliumusat - Reply

The magnetic mat its priceless I found. As I removed screws, I placed on magnetic mat and labeled right away. Reassembly time was a breeze.

RayBob - Reply

Upside-down masking tape also works well, especially when labelled with corresponding step for each bit of parts!

W Fleming -

i did the battery replacement and now my gyro isnt working. I did not know the screws had different lengths. Think it will be ok if i take apart and put correctly or do i need a new logic board??

William Boggs - Reply

The two 1.7 mm Phillips #000 screws should be placed on top and the 1.2 & 1.3 mm Phillips #000 screw at the bottom.

If you do not respect that order, the Bluetooth calls feature will not work anymore.

Please change all the versions including this step.

Louis Torres - Reply

I skipped steps 11-16 and that worked pretty well from me. On another commenter's advice, I simply used some packaging tape to tape onto the top of the screen, over the top of the phone, and onto the back of the phone to hold the display at a right angle to the rest of the device. Saved me all the trouble/risk of disconnecting the display, but if you use this method you should be VERY careful not to hit the display while removing the battery.

lambdahindiii - Reply

I completely agree with lambdahindiii, skip steps 11 - 16 completely. You do have to be careful not to flip open the display, but it's manageable with some care.

I will give disclaimer that I used 3.0x magnification with surgical loupes. Any kind of magnification will help. Also recommend using an LED head lamp for optimal illumination.

wmlee1 -

I'm going to upvote the suggestion to skip steps 11- 16 too.

Some things to look out for:

- Both the battery adhesive strips broke off for me so I had to pry the battery out. You do have to be careful as a good amount of pressure is needed to remove the battery that you don't twist the top display and break the connectors. It's just a trade-off of risks though - you won't have to worry about losing or inserting the wrong screws for the front panel connectors either.

- The metal connector over the touch ID button is hard to put back in. It looks like one piece on the video but it's a separate metal piece that goes over the connector.

- To open the case with the suction cup, I found it useful to place the cup more to one side, and lift that side up first and then work on the other side.

Take your time and good luck all

wilten -

I agree. The steps to remove the display are unnecessary. I skipped these and had no issues.

Matt Reier -

On my phone it actually seems like one of the 1.7mm screws is non-magnetic (the other 3 screws are magnetic). Although this could be a botched repair job from a previous owner...

I guess if it's intentional, it should be the top-right one, as that is closest to the compass IC.

woods81 - Reply

You're right. The top right screw must be non-ferrous stainless. I've repaired tons of the5-5s and that screw is never magnetic.

BJS -

You are absolutely correct — the upper right one is the non-ferrous / non-magnetic one. I’ve made corrections to this guide and the guide for the iPhone 5 but each time the edits have been denied, once by @Reed Danis and the previous by @Walter Galan. Not sure why they’re denied — it’s obvious which one doesn’t stick to a magnetic screwdriver. This mistake makes these guides quite unreliable and will screw (ha) with the compass.

Drtofu -

Apparently it is non magnetic so as not to interfere with the compass. The iPhone 6 has moved tis down to the bottom near the battery connector.

Jack -

I was fixing a broken screen, when I noticed that the guy that had started the job before leaving it to me, had mixed up the screws for the battery that he changed by himself and step 11. So i started searching around for an answer when the startup just looped with the Apple logo. and I of course started here, and found out that he had mixed up the screws, but step 11 here, and the same step at this link: http://www.irepairnational.com/iphone-5s...

shows two different ways to where the 1,2mm and the 1,7mm screws are being placed.

what is the correct way?

alexaamo91 - Reply

i had the 'blue screen of death' and here was my workaround:

Apple logo then blue screen

kgale4 -

I was wondering exactly the same thing why we need to un-screw the screen? Anyway place the screws in the order they come and you should find no problems putting them back in right order.

Also I found the screw driver comes with ifixit battery kit does not fit in the screws perfectly. Feeling a little large for these screws. Anyone else had the same experience?

fredhdx - Reply

The screw 1.7mm screw (highlighted green) was magnetic on the phone I repaired, while the standoff near it in step #27 was not (*see my note in #27). Either I have different parts or the magnetism note was swapped. If anyone else can confirm or deny this it’d help the guide. Thanks.

mnoivad - Reply

Invest in several colored Sharpie pens. When you see a red circle on the guide, tap that screw head with a red sharpie, orange, green, blue and so forth. This makes it almost fool-proof to not mix up your screws when re-assembling the phone or any other piece of equipment.

Pete H - Reply

I cannot unscrew the Philips #000 screws in this step using iFixit's Philips #000 screwdriver. The screw does not even turn at all. I wonder about the screwdriver iFixit is using in the video - https://youtu.be/k_OpjhKAUCM?t=180 . Can we buy it ?

Daylen - Reply

Putting the upper screws back in the bracket is a bit tricky--if you hold the screen at 90 degrees, the connector cables lift up the loose bracket, but if you lower the screen to allow the bracket to lay flat, you can't reach with a screw driver. Be very slow and patient and replace the upper left screw last (after the first three are tight)--these will hold down the bracket fairly well so you can aim the last (upper left) screw into the hole and push down as you tighten.

bartonh - Reply

So I managed to loose the top right (non magnetic) screw. I saw it fall to the table, but it's gone. Wonder if it fell back into the phone, as there is a slight rattle sound when I shake it. Will there be any big surprises if I just reassemble without that screw?

larserikkolden - Reply

If you keep the top steady these steps (17-22) could be skipped. That's how I did. Everything is ok.except screwdriver didn't undo upper one of the battery bracket I had to bend the bracket.

Mehmet Hakan - Reply

I noticed that reassembling my device, if the metal bracket touch the hole of the 1.3mm screw the touch stopped working. I had to put a little piece of plastic between the hole and the bracket unable to put the screw in (or it would make contact between the hole and the bracket).

Any suggestion?

denis.g.94 - Reply

Trying to get the screws into the holes and driving them in was extraordinarily challenging due in large part to their magnetic bond. Screws didn't want to leave the driver, once they were in they flew right back out as soon as the driver came within distance. To combat this, I suggest using a thin, clear tape (I used packing tape) cut into 4 strips and place each screw flat side down on one end of each strip of tape. Now you can easily maneuver and securely hold the screws into their holes as the driver pierces the tape easily screwing them in without losing them or your mind. Also, fridge magnets are good to retrieve screws that have fallen into iPhone's nooks and crannies, likewise from carpeting.

James Lee - Reply

If I messed up the screw placement, can it be redone and fixed by putting the screws back in prober order?

Colm Noone - Reply

Like James Lee (above), I found reinserting the tiny screws quite difficult because the magnetic screwdriver would pull them out, with the screw adhering to the screwdriver at odd angles. What worked was to insert a screw with tweezers, then START the screw using the non-magnetic plastic pointy tool while holding down the plate so the screw could turn easily. Once the screw was started, I tightened it with the screwdriver.

Sandy Trevor - Reply

Firstly do not just watch the video if you are going to do the battery replacement. I was too busy and stupid and only watched the video and boogered my Girlfiends 5S with the screw replacement boon doggle... You must read the iFix full instructions (forget the video) or you will screw it up!..

yaterbob - Reply

The iFixit Kit I bought does NOT have the right screw driver to remove these screws. Neither phillips screwdrivers work - the point is much too sharp and does not grip the screw at all. Not happy with this purchase right now.

Richard - Reply

Remove the front panel assembly cable bracket from the logic board.
  • Remove the front panel assembly cable bracket from the logic board.

At my iPhone 5s this part is missing!

Michael Schöttner - Reply

Use the flat end of a spudger to disconnect the front-facing camera and sensor cable. Use the flat end of a spudger to disconnect the front-facing camera and sensor cable.
  • Use the flat end of a spudger to disconnect the front-facing camera and sensor cable.

The flat end of the spudger works great to position and press down on the connectors during reassembly.

Magnus Dalen - Reply

While still supporting the front panel, disconnect the LCD cable connector. When reassembling your phone, the LCD cable may pop off the connector. This can result in white lines or a blank screen when powering your phone back on. If that happens, simply reconnect the cable and power cycle your phone. The best way to power cycle your phone is to disconnect and reconnect the battery.
  • While still supporting the front panel, disconnect the LCD cable connector.

  • When reassembling your phone, the LCD cable may pop off the connector. This can result in white lines or a blank screen when powering your phone back on. If that happens, simply reconnect the cable and power cycle your phone. The best way to power cycle your phone is to disconnect and reconnect the battery.

When you reassemble the cables, you can align them with the sockets using the tip of your finger. A spudger or tweezers are way too clunky and is actually far more difficult. When the cable aligns with the socket, give it a firm push with your finger tip and you should be able to feel it click into place. This is actually a pretty tight mechanical fit and is fairly hard to dislodge.

Sheldon Carpenter - Reply

After some 4 seconds stripes start to appear and at the bottom a black band of some 3 mm horizontally over the screen. I've restarted, but it keeps showing a clean screen and then after a while the stripes and band start coming through. Is that a battery issue? And when I slide up the light intensity button, the screen starts shivering.

Jules JUSTE - Reply

And in my wife’s samsung replacing a battery is so easy. I’ve wasted a whole evening and now have broken cables. I get to buy a new screen and no phone for a couple of days. What $@$* is Apple pullig on us here? :(

Jules JUSTE - Reply

Because Apple wants you to just buy a new phone instead of replacing parts.

Bryan Remely -

Finally, disconnect the digitizer cable connector. Finally, disconnect the digitizer cable connector.
  • Finally, disconnect the digitizer cable connector.

When re-assembling, this is the most difficult cable to re-align and re-connect. A second set of hands is helpful. If not available, be patient and line up the connector carefully. Once reconnected, use care not to 'open' the front cover beyond about 85° to prevent pulling this one back off... If you do, you will have to power-cycle the phone (disconnect the battery) to get things working properly again.

Pete H - Reply

I agree that this was the most difficult step during reassembly. I was trying to use the various tools, but shredded up some of the foam padding on the back of the connectors. After struggling with this for ~20 minutes, I realized just pressing each connector down gently with the tip of my finger snapped each one into place rather easily, no tools necessary.

ilsedorec - Reply

Had to try 4 times until I finally got it right, I would say that less than 80° works well for this step, just take your time and be patient with the screws

hermosillaignacio - Reply

It should be noted somewhere around these steps that all but one of these connections get removed.

The connection that is left goes to the Power Button, the Mute Switch, and the Volume Buttons. This connection is on the bottom left, below the LCD power connection.

This connector was not supposed to be removed, and I removed all of them as a force of habit.

Once removed, it seems I removed part of the other half of the connector along with the first half.

This has left my customer's iPhone functional, but none of the buttons, besides Home Button/TouchID), work.

In the long run, this is not a huge issue, as AssistiveTouch can emulate physical button presses. I just figured it should be noted.

Mikereilly2009 - Reply

Remove the front panel assembly from the rear case.
  • Remove the front panel assembly from the rear case.

I replaced my old battery with the one I bought here in iFixit. I replaced the battery according to the instructions of this guide (Using a guitar string did the trick when removing the battery) and finally assembled the sensor ribbon. Turned on the phone and SURPRISE! Error, Touch ID Does Not Work. I was disappointed, in the most part because I was extremely careful, it's not my first repair, and I did not break the ribbon, the Home Button was working properly.

I spent 4 hours re-seating the ribbon and putting in place the metal bracket.

For you guys, who have lost Touch ID but didn't break the sensor flex cable AND the Home button works, I thing I have found a SOLUTION:

As you can see in the picture (link below), a grounding Tip under the screw MUST be in THIS POSITION. If misaligned it will not work. Mine was misaligned during the display disassembly (STEP 16) and this was the solution. A smile returned to my face.

IMG LINK:

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/1608...

Oscar Vera - Reply

Odd..my Touch ID stopped working after I replaced the battery too and I did not harm the connector cable at all and the bracket was snug in position. Then randomly 2 days later it started working again with all my fingerprints remembered. Weird.

Bob smith -

Dear Oscar,

I am very interested in your comment but the photo is not available any more. Could you send the updated link?

Thank you very much,

Alex

Alex -

The link to your photo is still not available. I do not understand which screw is being referred to associated with the fingerprint sensor.

Toby Parnell -

To anybody wondering what the picture was, Internet Archive saved it. You can find it here: https://web.archive.org/web/201606120038...

It’s also the same picture as the 2nd picture in Step 23.

Bryan Remely -

why cant u disconnect the lcd and just put the new one in reverse from step 16? wgy to step 32

Cameron Shelley - Reply

When you get the old screen off, check the frame edge where the digitizer rests. Mine was caked with gunk that had accumulated there from use. I gently used the tip of a spudger while holding the phone upside-down-ish and scraped out the gunk. Holding it upside-down kept the gunk from falling into the phone.

Sheldon Carpenter - Reply

thanks for that... I didn't even notice it until I saw your comment.

Brian Hayes -

Unscrew the single captive Phillips #000 screw securing the home button cable. The captive screw is fastened to the home button cable by a spring contact backing. During reassembly, ensure the contact is in the correct orientation—on the side of the screw nearest the LCD.
  • Unscrew the single captive Phillips #000 screw securing the home button cable.

  • The captive screw is fastened to the home button cable by a spring contact backing. During reassembly, ensure the contact is in the correct orientation—on the side of the screw nearest the LCD.

  • If your replacement part does not have this captive screw and spring contact, you will need to transfer them to the new cable.

The tiny "captive spring" came off of the back of the screw and I struggled to get it to go back on. I ended up placing the spring over the hole where the screw goes in, with the holes lined up then putting the screw through both.

Also, the replacement screen I received from ifixit.com was slightly different than the original. The small metal tab where this screw goes in was not slightly bent downward like the original. It didnt make any difference. The screw went back in as normal.

Nathan - Reply

Hi,

The home button doesn't work ?

Help

Sultan - Reply

BE CAREFUL HERE.

This so called 'captive' screw is not very captive at all and I have nearly lost it twice now.

If it does fall out, look closely at the pictures to figure out the orientation of the grounding finger.

Ben - Reply

Two things - As mentioned, the replacement screen is a bit different. Mine had a screw where an empty hole should have been for the "captive screw".. a bit confusing at first. Just remove it and carry on.

Second, if you're an occasional nunce like me, you might be confused by the little tab/prong/raised guy next to the screw. After you've screwed the "captive screw" in, that thing should be hovering above it/the metal plate of the screen, and should look just like the removal picture.

easleyjs - Reply

Out of curiosity, what happens if the "spring contact backing" is not in the correct orientation?

I re-assembled my phone without paying any attention to this, and it seems to work OK... maybe I coincidentally got it right without trying. What would happen if the contact was facing the wrong way?

wilsonmichaelpatrick - Reply

Hi Help !!! The home buton doesn't work anymore !

Chris91177 - Reply

what if you lose the spring contact. does the phone work without it? if not, where can I find a spring contact?

Andreas Kouroupis - Reply

I have this same problem. I lost mine but found the screw where can I order one from?

kristlewomack -

I also have this problem, do any home buttons come with this piece?

viarengo1 -

Hello. I lost the little 'spring clip'. My phone is working erratically. Could that be anything to do with the cip not being in place? Thanks

ggough60 - Reply

I am pretty sure I had replaced the captive spring wrong (didn't see the second image until I have completed the project). But the phone seems to have a perfectly working home button now.

Alan Kang - Reply

This screw/spring combo fell off right before reassembling. Good luck and found the screw again. So my advice: Put a tape around the screw/spring or dismount them from the cable and put them in a safe place. The spare screw delivered with the display was too short.

Tom Vee - Reply

I thought I lost the spring contact, but it actually just got rotated under the section of cable that the captive screw is attached to. The spring contact should be "captive" at the same place the screw is so it should'nt get lost too easily.

Anand Varma - Reply

Fold the home button cable down, out of the way of the home button bracket. Fold the home button cable down, out of the way of the home button bracket.
  • Fold the home button cable down, out of the way of the home button bracket.

Add Comment

Remove the two 1.4 mm Phillips #000 screws from the home button bracket.
  • Remove the two 1.4 mm Phillips #000 screws from the home button bracket.

Screws are stuck...! no way that I can unscrew them :-(

Sumit Bhatnagar - Reply

I had this issue, screws were so tight my screwdriver was starting to strip them. I managed to get one side off by applying massive pressure. I then wiggled the plate around to loosen the other side.

mrnoxious -

Hi every body! I would know much pressure the iphone 5s 's lcd can resist approximately !!? Have you ever stand on it?this happend for me , and in some positions under the direct sun light when the screen is ON , it seems that there is some pits on lcd ! ;-( please help ! If you had the same case! Help Thank You***

Bryan - Reply

I could not get a phillips #000 to release these, but a phillips #00 did the trick perfectly. South African version of the phone, if that makes a difference.

Andrew - Reply

these are the tightest screws I've ever seen in my life. Tried applying massive pressure and just stripped the screws. Not sure what to do now

Bob Mcroy - Reply

Use the #00 Philips on these screws

leeprobert - Reply

Went and bought a #00 when the #000 didnt work. Still no luck. About to lose my mind with frustration.

Mike Manning - Reply

I could not get the 000 or the 00 to work, therefore I tried a #1 flat head from the kit and it worked like a charm.

Sean O'Donohoe - Reply

Sometimes just switching to another screwdriver might help. I noticed that the screwdrivers you often get with displays assemblies are just crap. Invest in a good one.

Didier Daniel - Reply

Remove the home button bracket from the display assembly.
  • Remove the home button bracket from the display assembly.

For those having problems transferring their home button to the new display assembly: When installing the home button into the new display assembly I had the problem that the bracket kept the button "pressed down" because the button did not sink into the front panel completely. After removing the home button and reassuring that there was no dust or similar particles preventing the home button from sitting correctly, I still had to push gently to get the home button into the correct position.

larscmueller - Reply

Wedge the the tip of a spudger underneath the home button cable assembly. The home button cable is affixed by mild adhesive.
  • Wedge the the tip of a spudger underneath the home button cable assembly.

  • The home button cable is affixed by mild adhesive.

  • Gently work the spudger underneath the cable to separate the home button cable from the front panel assembly.

  • Do not remove the home button yet, as it is still attached to the front panel assembly.

Add Comment

If necessary, remove the tape over the home button on the front side of your cracked front panel assembly. Gently push the top left corner of the home button up away from the front panel.
  • If necessary, remove the tape over the home button on the front side of your cracked front panel assembly.

  • Gently push the top left corner of the home button up away from the front panel.

  • Do not push the home button all the way through—you only need to get a corner free, so that you can pry it free with a spudger.

  • This membrane is very thin. If you feel like you're going to tear the button, apply heat and try again.

Add Comment

Peel the home button the rest of the way off of the display by prying gently with a spudger. Peel the home button the rest of the way off of the display by prying gently with a spudger.
  • Peel the home button the rest of the way off of the display by prying gently with a spudger.

DO NOT skip this step, or you will damage the very gentle rubber hold around the home button, and that may result in a broken home button.

Addison Rasmussen - Reply

Remove the home button assembly from the front panel.
  • Remove the home button assembly from the front panel.

Add Comment

Display assembly remains.
  • Display assembly remains.

  • If your replacement display assembly is missing any components that are still on the assembly you just removed, follow this guide to transfer them to the new part.

  • If your replacement display assembly came with any protective plastic films that you don't see on the original display, be sure to peel them off before beginning reassembly.

It would be helpful if at this step, it hyperlinked to the steps needed to transfer the old camera/speaker assembly to the new piece. I had to hunt around for it, and I can imagine some people who don't have a lot of experience with these kinds of things just missing the fact entirely and assembling their phone without the camera!

erik - Reply

Guía perfecta. Muy completa y concisa en todo momento. Sin duda un gran post en el que se explica correctamente y muy detalladamente los pasos a seguir para cambiar la pantalla del iPhone 5s. Además las imagenes y el vídeo están en muy buena calidad, sin olvidar, y no menos importante, las herramientas que necesitas para el procedimiento del cambio. Por poner una pega, solo falta que la guía estuviese en Español. Por lo demás está perfecta y muy bien redactada. 9.5/10

Fernando Exposito Gonzalez - Reply

Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

958 other people completed this guide.

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51 Comments

Excellent guide, many thanks to the author and commenters. I replaced the rear facing camera at the same time and had no issues with parts or tools.

Agree with the comment from Nathan for Step 17 to be careful not to displace the captive spring, it would have slipped away from me if I had not read the comment. Tricky to manouvere that part.

Get the magnetic mat, makes things a lot easier. Thanks again.

Matt - Reply

It would be helpful if the guide used tools that were listed as required when purchasing the replacement screen. When I ordered the screen, the site suggested the iopener, which i purchased. It was not involved in the repair though the iclack tool was referenced.

lkboak - Reply

Hi, i have problem with my earpiece speaker after i reassemble my screen, it doesn't work and i should talk with the speaker, why it happen and what should i do???

Tanks.

Ali Sakhtianchi - Reply

This same thing happened to me. I had to take the front camera/sensor assembly out of my old device and use it with the new display assembly. Thankfully that part wasn't damaged or I would have been screwed.

Jorden -

I think ifixit have miss-drawn the screws for the LCD Plate. I believe the two motherboard (lower/bottom) screws should be the short ones, and the "red screws" should go at the top. Only the bottom 2 go into the PCB, the others go into pillars. Please can someone check this. As putting the 1.7mm in the Bottom Left Corner is a bad idea. it should be the 1.3mmm

russ - Reply

I can Confirm the above. There are two known models of iphone 5S, and 5C, and here in Australia most of these devices, the two bottom screws are the shortest, the top right is non magnetic (it sits next to the compass ic), which only leaves one remaining. If you get them out of order, just remember shortest at bottom, non magnetic top right.

In saying this if you are in Australia, we can offer a mail in service to repair the damage using the wrong screws can cause. Contact me on benduffy@itzcomputers.com.au for more info on this.

If you are in other parts of the world, I know others that can also fix this that are likely closer to you.

Ben Duffy - Reply

Great guide. iPhone 5S worked great for about 24 hours after screen replacement, however now won't charge. Screen shows the low battery symbol and doesn't charge up. When lightning connector is unplugged it shows the low battery symbol along with the "connect power to lightning" symbol so it recognizes that a charger is attached. Any advice? I'm not positive, but I think it did charge at least somewhat after the screen replacement. Thanks!

mark - Reply

Hi! have the same problem. Any luck fixing it?

MJ -

replace the battery and make sure the battery ribbon cable is installed correctly

heaneyboy00 -

This guide is extremely accurate. I had no problems with the install or the parts. I will continue using ifixit for all my repair needs.

gigantorpdx - Reply

I replaced this screen and I'm pretty confident I got the screws in the correct position.

Now my battery doesn't even last a full day. My phone usage hasn't changed. The phone is only 4 months old. Is it possible that I damaged something or would putting the screws in the wrong place cause this?

Thanks.

Pete - Reply

Do you know why the guide is missing the ear speaker and back plate installation slides? I knew how to take it apart but was guiding someone for training and was missing the earpiece

dpminnetonka - Reply

The guide worked perfectly for me. I went from a non responsive screen to one that works 95%. Now my issue for some reason are letters U, H, J, and the microphone key are not responsive. All other areas work on the screen. Where do I go from here? All parts came from iFixit but I went with the refurbished screen. Is this a screen issue or an error on my part with the re-connection?

ucfsae81 - Reply

Thank you for making this guide. It is an excellent step-by-step solution for the most common problem when it comes to iPhones. I will continue to use iFixit repair guides as my go-to source for my Computer and Phone Repair business.

Mitch - Reply

When reassembling your iPhone, make sure you remove the protective film from the new screen before snapping the phone back together. I had a perfectly functional repaired phone however when I went to remove the film, I found that some parts of it were stuck behind the screen.

Being anal about my repair work (this was for my wife's phone) I thought I would simply pop it back open and remove the remnants of the protective film. Although I was very careful re-opening the phone, I must have pulled a fraction of an inch too far and ended up ripping both the screen and home button ribbon cables.

Much swearing ensued. It was a very expensive lesson (ended up being $174 CDN after shipping and exchange), and if you plan on doing more than one phone, I would recommend getting the iSclack.

As to the comment about why they offer the suction cup option: I was able to open the phone with the broken screen fine, and the previous iPhone didn't have the touch id cable which meant you had a bit more leeway when opening.

bob - Reply

I wonder if their replacement Display Assemblies might come with non-functional components? The actual display replacement went smoothly, but neither the earpiece speaker or the front-facing camera worked. After opening and re-seating connectors several times, I replaced the earpiece in the newly purchased iFixit assembly with the one from the broken display assembly - and it now works! I'm contemplating doing the same with the camera, but the reason that I paid for the entire assembly was so that I did not have to do this. I have seen this issue in several other comments, and wonder if this is a systemic problem with their products, and wonder what the quality control process is?

joe - Reply

To anybody that needs to replace just the screen/glass, I would recommend finding a kit that includes the screen, glass, digitizer, home button and front camera assembly all in one as it makes it MUCH easier than transferring the parts over. I got mine on ebay from a reputable seller since I could not find one on amazon.

Cameron - Reply

When installing the replacement screen...do not "hunt" around for the logic board's LCD/Digitizer connections w/ the replacement screen's connectors. This easily results in deforming the connectors on the board, which kills the phone.

Matt H - Reply

Finally, followed your guide and replace my iphone 5s display.

Note: There seems to be a discrepancy in step 8. The **orientation** of metal bracket covering the home button cable is flipped between this guide and the accompanying video. I think the video got the correct orientation. Thanks.

Sam - Reply

This is a super , detailed, instructive, video.I nearly started to split my iPhone 5S just to try out the procedure.

Gwen is one of my favorite hosts on iFixit, very thorough, well spoken and as an extra plus very charming.

Can't wait for the iPhone 5SE split, because I'v decided that to be my next iphone. Like the housing moore than the" gigantophones"

Steffen Gyhrs - Reply

Hi! My Iphone won't charge after this. Does anyone know why? Everything else works perfectly but i haven't have the chance too check it before my battery went dead, and won't charge back up.. please help

MJ - Reply

Niece's iPhone is fixed, she had a cracked screen. This wasn't my first iPhone repair, but it was my first 5s repair. The guide was a breeze, thanks Walter Galan!

Jessica - Reply

Excellent step by step, completed the install twice, first run broke the new screen due to not lining up the top of the display correctly. Second time was the charm. iSclack made the disassembly a breeze highly recommend it.

Jason Meyer - Reply

Very helpful guide. The first ever Phone repair I have done and works perfectly. Have been doing Iphone repairs for about 4 months now and can do most of the screen replacements thanks to IFixit.

Thanks Guys!

Charlie Stewart - Reply

Hi, how to replace just the glass screen? Does anybody know this? Tia, Chris

Ralph - Reply

From the video I've seen, it isn't work all the extra work. Just replace the screen + digitizer.

woodworkerfella -

Successfully completed this guide. I have touch id home button, so transferred it from the old broken front assembly to the new one successfully. All working as expected again.

Tim Ellison - Reply

if anyone could help me after following the guide the phone just has a black screen my computer recognizes it but it doesnt vibrate or make any noise at all .

Michael B Watkins - Reply

replaced screen ok turns on ok but wont swipe to unlock any suggestions

angeline donnelly - Reply

More than likely the digitizer cable isn't seated fully. This will prevent any touch capabilities. It's the last one when removing and the first one when connecting.

Denver Wade -

Very good guide, no problems at all in doing so all by myself and it was the first time I opened up a phone so, thanks!

marcocopeta - Reply

Thank you! Everything works perfectly! Very good guide.

Treizias - Reply

I phone 5s. After replacing the screen I turn the phone on. The initial brightness was normal while the"apple" logo was running. After that the screen went gray, not sufficiently lit, and stay gray, Any advice?

Sanevich - Reply

The "ifixit"was correct. I found that the LCD shield plate cable was broken. I think this is the problem. I order a new flex with the front camera and a shield. hopefully it will work. The advise was from-" iRobot Killer" Thank you

Sanevich - Reply

this guide leaves out how to remove the proximity sensor assembly which is critical to this repair. great article otherwise, but unfortunately incomplete

Connor Murphy - Reply

Hey Connor! This is a guide for a complete assembly part, if you want to strip your display down, follow this slightly longer front panel replacement guide. =)

Sam Lionheart -

I was able to repair my son's iPhone 5s with a cracked display using the iFixit complete display kit and the instructions provided. ifixit rocks! Please stay forever!

Jack Shaffer - Reply

great guide well illustrated and good zoom in for the pictures

gery blackwood - Reply

I phone 5s. I have replaced The complete LCD display screen with home button, front camera, ear speaker. Every thing is OK with the exception of the SPEAKER, it does not working. What could be wrong?

Thank you

Leonid Sanevich

Sanevich - Reply

Great guide, but after my repair, I noticed that my earpiece speaker is faulty... I can hear sounds but it is weak. I tried to raise the volume but it is already max. So I have bought a new earpiece speaker and it does the same thing... Can someone help me? Thanks.

cloud181 - Reply

if you touched the little gold springs or the contact pads then the grease off of your fingers could be causing a poor contact. Try cleaning both with an appropriate solvent such as IPS or electrical solvent cleaner from maplin. Do this carefully by spraying some solvent onto the end of a cotton wool bud, don't spray anywhere near the phone!

Peter Machin -

PLEASE DO NOT OVER TIGHTEN YOUR SCREWS DURING THE REINSTALL! I found my screen glitching out and showing gray bars when I snapped everything together. The screen and ribbons are extremely sensitive, so please do not overtighten. If you find yourself experiencing a glitchy screen or grey bars after the install, unscew each screw and see if it fixs the problem. If it doesnt continue working backwards unscrewing the screws (especially with the screen ribbons) and playing with the screen. If you do notice that unscrewing a screw fixs the problem, try loosening other screws slightly and lightly screw in the remaining screws. During this process, at times the scree would only work at an angle of 20/30 degress from the battery. Take your time and be patient. Good Luck!

jacob - Reply

Great description, everything worked fine but the new display by ifixit.com does not perform like the old apple (1136 × 640 Pixel, 326 ppi), looks more like a toy for children. Does anybody have the same problem? Thanks for your help!

derkritiker - Reply

Dear Support Team,

Thanks for your quick help. The new display you sent me for free does perform like the original apple display.

Best greetings

derkritiker -

awesome guide easy to follow and very detailed, thanks!

mathew - Reply

Hi, originally I followed a video guide which wasn't very detailed. The first time I replaced my screen it worked, but I had to take apart again to fix the power button. Second time around, I get a completely black screen. I read this guide and replaced all the screws in the correct spots. Still just a black screen. Is this a problem with the LCD and should I buy a whole new screen? Or what else might cause it to be completely black? The phone rings when I call etc.

Bonny Lea - Reply

Did you disconnect the battery before disconnecting the display cables? If you skipped the battery step, you likely have a blown backlight circuit. You can confirm by shining a bright flashlight directly onto the display while turning on the phone—if you can faintly see graphics/text on the display but it just isn't lighting up, that's a blown backlight circuit and you'll need a skilled microsolderer to fix it. If not that, it could simply be a disconnected cable or a faulty display—open the phone back up and reseat the display connectors, and/or try a different display. For more detailed help, run a search or drop a post in our Answers forum. Good luck!

Jeff Suovanen -

Managed to replace the screen of my only working phone (:

Thanks for the detailed help!

Igor Schoevaart - Reply

Well, first complete screen replacement went exactly as the guide showed. I used a hair dryer instead of an iOpener for the adhesive, worked like a charm.

lavudyar - Reply

Dsiplay is working, transferred Home-Button ist working, the Power-Button is working, Charging is workind

But I’m not able to enter my Code by Using my Finger.

Any Ideas?

Baumgardt1 - Reply

After Replacement the Touch doenst work.

Charging - ok

Display-Graphics - ok

Homebutton - ok

Powerbutton - ok

enter the Code with my finger on the screen or swipe the “power off” Option - fail

any Ideas?

Baumgardt1 - Reply

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