iPod Touch 5th Generation 16 GB 2014 Teardown

Teardown

Teardown

Teardowns provide a look inside a device and should not be used as disassembly instructions.

Featured Guide

Featured Guide

This guide has been found to be exceptionally cool by the iFixit staff.

Apple has quietly introduced an updated version of the iPod Touch 5th Generation 16 GB. What exactly is Apple trying to sneak past us? We're about to find out. Join us as we explore the newest addition to the iPod Touch family. Ladies and gentlemen, we present the iPod Touch 5th Generation 16 GB 2014 teardown.

This teardown train stops for no one! Friend us on Facebook, trade tweets with us on Twitter, and get touchy feely on our Instagram.

Edit Step 1 iPod Touch 5th Generation 16 GB 2014 Teardown  ¶ 

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Edit Step 1 iPod Touch 5th Generation 16 GB 2014 Teardown  ¶ 

  • The new and improved iPod Touch 5th Generation 16 GB economy model now features a 5-megapixel iSight camera, bringing it up to par with its 32 and 64 GB brethren.

  • Let's take a look at the technical specifications:

    • 4-inch (diagonal) widescreen Retina display with Multi-Touch IPS technology

    • 802.11a/b/g/n Wi-Fi (802.11n 2.4GHz and 5GHz) + Bluetooth 4.0

    • 5-megapixel, 1080p iSight camera with LED flash and a ƒ/2.4 aperture FaceTime 1.2 MP HD camera capable of capturing HD video (720p) up to 30 fps

    • New iPod touch loop

    • Three-axis gyro + accelerometer

    • 16 GB storage capacity

Edit Step 2  ¶ 

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Edit Step 2  ¶ 

  • The iPod Touch 5th Gen 16 GB 2014 gains the wrist-strap peg previously reserved for the upper echelons of the Touch line—though you'll have to shell out some more dough for the strap itself, which is sold separately.

  • We spy a revised model number tattooed on the back: A1421.

  • This retro model number is yet further proof that this device isn't an update of the previous 16GB version so much as a throwback to the 5th Gens of olde.

Edit Step 3  ¶ 

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Edit Step 3  ¶ 

  • OPEN SESAME! Since that trick didn't work, we turn to the iOpener.

  • When it comes to opening an iPhone, the iSclack is our favorite tool by far. But how will it fare against the adhesive of the iPod Touch? With enough heat from an iOpener, the iSclack shucks this iPod like a pistachio.

  • ...And we're in. This iPod opens in the classic clam-like fashion, with familiar innards, and not a pearl in sight.

Edit Step 4  ¶ 

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Edit Step 4  ¶ 

  • The first major change is unearthed: The headphone jack no longer has the bit of tape found in its beefier-storaged cousins.

  • On your left: a tapeless aux port. On your right: imagery from an iPod Touch 5th Generation repair guide featuring fancy tape removal.

  • That makes your repair one step easier, and probably saves Apple billionths and billionths of pennies!

    • Then again, maybe they just forgot the tape in this unit...

Edit Step 5  ¶ 

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Edit Step 5  ¶ 

  • Commence separation! Here we can see the wonderful mess of guts that have been stuffed inside this iPod.

  • Since this is the same device, we won't announce it as news—but Apple certainly likes to play the "how many components can we cram onto a single cable" game in their iPods.

  • The logic board, front-facing camera, battery, Lightning connector, headphone jack, speaker, and home button are all soldered together to form a single conglomerate.

    • This reigning champion rests easy, assured of its claim to the title. While the rest of us plot its demise.

Edit Step 6  ¶ 

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Edit Step 6  ¶ 

  • Apple probably chose this humble device to introduce a revolutionary new camera, said no one.

  • Actually, this looks very much like the camera we found in the other A1421 models. It packs a five-element lens with a hybrid IR filter and an ƒ/2.4 aperture. It's able to capture 5 MP images or 1080p (full HD) video at 30 FPS.

Edit Step 7  ¶ 

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Edit Step 7  ¶ 

  • What sorts of integrated chips will we find on the logic board? Let's see:

    • Apple A5 dual-core processor, with 4 Gb (512 MB) of Elpida Mobile DDR2 RAM, denoted by the B4064B3PM silkscreen label

    • Toshiba THGBX3G7D2KLA0C 128 Gb (16 GB) NAND flash

    • Apple 338S1064-B1 dialog power management IC (similar to the Apple 338S1131)

    • Murata 339S0171 Wi-Fi module

    • Broadcom BCM5976 touchscreen controller

    • 338S1146 Apple/Cirrus Logic audio codec

    • STMicroelectronics AGD4 2336 L84DC low-power, three-axis gyroscope

Edit Step 8  ¶ 

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Edit Step 8  ¶ 

  • Integrated chips galore! Let's check out the rest of the smorgasbord:

    • Texas Instruments 343S0628 touchscreen controller

    • STMicroelectronics 8406 DSH 08BIY

    • NXP Semiconductors 1608A1 display interface controller

  • Hiding between the Lightning connector and headphone jack, we (again) find:

    • Apple 338S1077 Cirrus Logic audio codec

Edit Step 9  ¶ 

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Edit Step 9  ¶ 

  • (Still) no surprises here, the iPod Touch 5th Generation 16 GB 2014 Repairability score: 3 out of 10 (10 is easiest to repair).

  • While very difficult, opening the case and replacing components is not impossible.

  • The battery is flanked by notches that make prying it out of the rear case fairly easy.

  • Many components are soldered together, requiring either a very difficult or a very expensive repair if any one part breaks.

  • There are no external screws. Instead, a combo of clips and adhesive makes it difficult to open the case.

  • Ribbon cables connected to the logic board run over the top and connect on the bottom, making it difficult to remove the board or disconnect the cables.

Required Tools

Spudger

$2.95 · 50+ In stock

Phillips #00 Screwdriver

$5.95 · 50+ In stock

iOpener

$19.95 · 50+ In stock

iSclack

$24.95 · 50+ In stock

Recommended Tools

54 Bit Driver Kit

$29.95 · 50+ In stock

Pro Magnetic Project Mat

$19.95 · 50+ In stock

Pro Tech Screwdriver Set

$59.95 · 50+ In stock

Anti-Static Project Tray

$4.95 · 50+ In stock

Comments Comments are onturn off

i see several xmas presents here so that my grandkids can fix my stuff. excellent.

robbie, · Reply

These teardowns are so interesting! Thanks! ☺

Armen Orbelyan, · Reply

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