Video Overview

Introduction

It's officially spring, which means pastels, bunnies, and shiny new devices to eggsplore. HTC sprouted a third One, the M9, and we hopped right to a teardown. Join us as we crack open our pre-Easter treat, the HTC One M9.

Ready to spring into action? Follow us on Instagram, like us on Facebook, or listen to the birds tweet on Twitter.

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your HTC One M9, use our service manual.

Image 1/2: 5.0-inch, 1920 x 1080 display, with front-facing stereo speakers Image 2/2: 20 MP rear-facing camera with 4K video recording; HTC UltraPixel front-facing camera with 1080p video recording
  • HTC hopes the M9 will be the One for you. Let's see just what it's packing:

    • 5.0-inch, 1920 x 1080 display, with front-facing stereo speakers

    • 20 MP rear-facing camera with 4K video recording; HTC UltraPixel front-facing camera with 1080p video recording

    • Qualcomm Snapdragon 810—64-bit, octa-core (4 x 2.0 GHz + 4 x 1.5 GHz)

    • 3 GB RAM

    • 32 GB of on-board storage; up to 2 TB additional microSD storage

    • LTE, Bluetooth 4.1, NFC, HDMI MHL 3.0, 802.11ac, and IR blaster

Add Comment

Image 1/2: HTC recently rolled out [http://www.htc.com/us/uh-oh-protection/|"Uh-Oh Protection"|new_window=true] for One M8 and One M9, promising an entire replacement phone for a cracked screen or water damage in the first year of One-rship. Image 2/2: We're betting this deal has something to do with the [guide|23615|repair-unfriendly design|new_window=true] that these phones share.
  • Did HTC secretly send us a Mac Mini? No, but it's definitely a uniquely designed box.

  • HTC recently rolled out "Uh-Oh Protection" for One M8 and One M9, promising an entire replacement phone for a cracked screen or water damage in the first year of One-rship.

Add Comment

Image 1/2: Coincidentally, our phone seems to have encountered more relaxed quality standards than is expected from HTC. Image 2/2: Straight out of the box we noticed a large scratch on the bottom left corner of the display glass.
  • HTC has been experiencing some shipping delays with the One M9, presumably due to a lack of stock.

    • Coincidentally, our phone seems to have encountered more relaxed quality standards than is expected from HTC.

  • Straight out of the box we noticed a large scratch on the bottom left corner of the display glass.

  • And it doesn't stop there! When we first booted up the phone, we were greeted by a lovely defective pixel near the middle of the screen.

  • These issues are giving us a bad feeling about this phone...

Add Comment

Image 1/2: The M9's most noticeable difference from its [guide|23615|predecessor|new_window=true] is a return to a single rear camera, like the original [guide|13494|HTC One|new_window=true]. Possibly HTC decided that competing with the [guide|5029|3DS dual camera|new_window=true] was a little beneath them. Image 2/2: The M9's secondary metamorphosis was a migrational button shuffle.
  • The dual-tone metal unibody of the M9 is practically identical to that of the M8. The gunmetal gray M9 is just a shade darker than its older sibling; otherwise, you might say these HTCs are twins! Well, almost...

  • The M9's most noticeable difference from its predecessor is a return to a single rear camera, like the original HTC One. Possibly HTC decided that competing with the 3DS dual camera was a little beneath them.

  • The M9's secondary metamorphosis was a migrational button shuffle.

    • With the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, Apple learned that a top-mounted power button doesn't cut it for a hand-stretching phablet, and moved its power switch to the side. Looks like HTC caught on and followed suit with the M9.

    • The M9 also replaces the rocker switch of yesteryear with dedicated volume +/- buttons.

I have the one m9+ with a broken finger print sensor. Is there a way to show that repair?

anthony chong - Reply

  • Some persistent picking at the top of the case reveals a couple of Torx screws.

    • Gone are the frontal access panels. The two screws at the top are all the M9 relies on, so far at least.

    • Maybe this One doesn't have the Hermetically Tight Case we were fearing.

  • So far, so good. The M8 came fastened with screws rather than formidable adhesive and finicky clips, so let's hope the anti-adhesive trend continues...

Add Comment

Image 1/3: We use our trusty pick to ~~rent the phone in twain~~ carefully separate the rear case from the body of the phone. Image 2/3: The bottom clips are particularly stubborn, but so far, no adhesive! Image 3/3: As we pop the rear case of the M9, we get our first view of the tender morsels inside. At first glance, this new HTC One closely resembles the M8.
  • Unlike the original HTC One, there's no need to Heat The Case of the M9. After removing the top panel's screws, we get straight to business with an opening pick to Handle Those Clips.

  • We use our trusty pick to rent the phone in twain carefully separate the rear case from the body of the phone.

  • The bottom clips are particularly stubborn, but so far, no adhesive!

  • As we pop the rear case of the M9, we get our first view of the tender morsels inside. At first glance, this new HTC One closely resembles the M8.

Add Comment

Image 1/2: Aside from the minor housekeeping and  ditching the Duo Lens depth-perceiving camera, not much seems to have changed. Image 2/2: Except for the color. The motherboard is now blue, which probably makes it run faster than last year's green.
  • HTC clearly loves its shielding. We're thankful that they've abandoned the tape strata of the M8 (second image), for a slightly cleaner and more accessible design on the new M9 (first).

  • Aside from the minor housekeeping and ditching the Duo Lens depth-perceiving camera, not much seems to have changed.

    • Except for the color. The motherboard is now blue, which probably makes it run faster than last year's green.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: Whoever went tape-happy last year has been duly pacified. While there are still plenty of connectors, they're easier to get to, and to dispatch.
  • This HTC teardown is feeling a lot less like the open heart surgery we had to perform on the M8.

  • Whoever went tape-happy last year has been duly pacified. While there are still plenty of connectors, they're easier to get to, and to dispatch.

    • Let's hope we don't jinx this motherboard removal...

Add Comment

Image 1/2: Not only is the motherboard adhered, it's bang up against the battery—a "soft" battery. Image 2/2: After some very gentle prying with a blunt spudger, we manage to free the motherboard and not catch fire.
  • Augh! What is this? Looks like HTC's engineers weren't interested in our input from the M8. They've stuck with their habit of gluing down the motherboard.

    • Not only is the motherboard adhered, it's bang up against the battery—a "soft" battery.

  • After some very gentle prying with a blunt spudger, we manage to free the motherboard and not catch fire.

    • Phew!

  • Oh and the rotational vibrator? Yeah, it's now soldered to the motherboard, and (lightly) adhered to the case.

    • No more connector, and no more snug sleeve. Replacement just got a notch more involved.

Add Comment

Image 1/2: Samsung [https://memorylink.samsung.com/ecomobile/mem/ecomobile/product/productDetail.do?topMenu=P&subMenu=mobileDram&partNo=K3RG3G30MM-MGCH&partSetNo=LPDDR4&partSetLabel=LPDDR4|K3RG3G30MM-MGCH|new_window=true] 3 GB LPDDR4 RAM + Qualcomm [https://www.qualcomm.com/products/snapdragon/processors/810|Snapdragon 810|new_window=true] octa-core CPU Image 2/2: Samsung [http://intelatech.com/PSG2014_2H_FINAL.pdf|KLMBG4GEND-B031|new_window=true] 32 GB eMMC NAND flash
  • Here're The Chips! Covered in what hopefully isn't snot (they came a little dirtier than we're used to...)

    • Samsung K3RG3G30MM-MGCH 3 GB LPDDR4 RAM + Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 octa-core CPU

    • Samsung KLMBG4GEND-B031 32 GB eMMC NAND flash

    • Qualcomm PMI8994 Power Management IC

    • Broadcom BCM4356 2x2 802.11ac Wi-Fi solution with Bluetooth 4.1 support (Also found in the Nexus 6)

    • Qualcomm WTR3925 28 nm RF transceiver

    • Avago ACPM-7800 multimode, multiband power amplifier module

    • Silicon Image SIL8620 MHL 3.0 transmitter

Add Comment

Image 1/1: Yep, the motherboard [guide|23615|still|stepid=61146|new_window=true] has to come out before the battery. And the battery is ''still'' a glue sandwich—Hold The Cheese.
  • Now that the motherboard is out, we can remove the (hopefully undamaged) battery! After some more prying, that is.

    • Yep, the motherboard still has to come out before the battery. And the battery is still a glue sandwich—Hold The Cheese.

  • We complained last year, and we Have To Complain again this year. A lithium-ion battery is a consumable—it's only good for a limited number of charge cycles before it starts to lose capacity and needs to be replaced.

    • Burying the battery so deeply within the device signs its death certificate the day of its manufacturing birth.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: [http://www.anandtech.com/show/9102/the-htc-one-m9-review-part-1/2|AnandTech's review|new_window=true] found the M9's battery life slightly disappointing compared to the M8. It seems HTC made an effort to stop the bleeding with a capacity bump, but it's ultimately not enough to surpass its predecessor.
  • Spec-wise, HTC has once again given the battery a slight capacity boost—up to 10.87 Whr from yesteryear's 9.88, but still a little shy of the 11.1 Wh in the iPhone 6 Plus. (The original One sported a measly 8.74 Whr battery.)

    • AnandTech's review found the M9's battery life slightly disappointing compared to the M8. It seems HTC made an effort to stop the bleeding with a capacity bump, but it's ultimately not enough to surpass its predecessor.

    • Add the fact that the M9 supports Qualcomm's new Quick Charge 2.0 spec, but ships with a conventional 5 V, 1.5 A charger that can't provide the quick juice, and we're a little disappointed.

    • Take note, HTC. The Nexus 6 accepts Quick Charge and ships with a quick-charge compatible charger.

Add Comment

Image 1/3: And with it, the newly single rear-facing camera. Image 2/3: You go, camera—you are a strong independent image capturing component that doesn't need any gimmicky 3D to define you. Image 3/3: The M9's 20 MP rear camera sports a sapphire cover lens—possibly in response to [http://forums.androidcentral.com/htc-one-m8/380522-htc-one-m8-camera-lens-issue.html|criticism|new_window=true] of an easily-scratched cover on the M8. HTC seemingly took a cue from [guide|29206|Apple|stepid=68988|new_window=true] and introduced some camera bling.
  • We want to get a look at the M9's Highly Touted Camera. After one last connector, a few more screws, and some adhesive, the daughterboard is finally free.

  • And with it, the newly single rear-facing camera.

    • You go, camera—you are a strong independent image capturing component that doesn't need any gimmicky 3D to define you.

  • The M9's 20 MP rear camera sports a sapphire cover lens—possibly in response to criticism of an easily-scratched cover on the M8. HTC seemingly took a cue from Apple and introduced some camera bling.

Add Comment

Image 1/3: HTC's BoomSound speakers make their encore performance in the M9. This new iteration of the BoomSound speakers sports Dolby Audio, bringing a full soundstage to your video chats with Nana. Image 2/3: We tweeze out the I/O board, along with the attached 3.5 mm audio jack, microphone, and micro-USB port. Image 3/3: We tweeze out the I/O board, along with the attached 3.5 mm audio jack, microphone, and micro-USB port.
  • Speaker box! Full of styrofoam! Such technology.

  • HTC's BoomSound speakers make their encore performance in the M9. This new iteration of the BoomSound speakers sports Dolby Audio, bringing a full soundstage to your video chats with Nana.

  • We tweeze out the I/O board, along with the attached 3.5 mm audio jack, microphone, and micro-USB port.

Add Comment

Image 1/3: We find numerous cryptic characters scrawled on the back of the LCD. Does this One have a secret message for us? Image 2/3: After consulting our [http://gaspull.geeksaresexytech.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/r2d2-c3po.jpg|Highly Trained Cryptologist|new_window=true], we've been informed that they're probably just quality assurance marks. Image 3/3: After consulting our [http://gaspull.geeksaresexytech.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/r2d2-c3po.jpg|Highly Trained Cryptologist|new_window=true], we've been informed that they're probably just quality assurance marks.
  • It's time to turn up the heat! Two particularly sticky strips of adhesive stood in our way, and it took a lot of careful heating and prying with the iOpener to free the LCD.

  • We find numerous cryptic characters scrawled on the back of the LCD. Does this One have a secret message for us?

Add Comment

Image 1/3: NXP [link|https://chipworks.secure.force.com/catalog/ProductDetails?sku=NXP-47803&viewState=DetailView&cartID=&g=|47803|new_window=true] NFC controller, as seen in the [guide|27458|Amazon Fire Phone|stepid=67319|new_window=true] Image 2/3: Qualcomm [http://www.anandtech.com/show/8933/snapdragon-810-performance-preview/2|QFE2550|new_window=true] antenna tuner Image 3/3: Maxim Integrated [http://datasheets.maximintegrated.com/en/ds/MAXQ614.pdf|MAXQ614|new_window=true] 16-bit microcontroller with infrared module
  • The camera board is out of the phone and ready for its close-up. Here's what's chilling on the board:

  • It looks like HTC moved all their Ultrapixels to the display side—this 4 MP front-facing camera has the same specs as the M8's primary camera, but in a slightly smaller package.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: This is likely an iteration of the S3350B found in the [guide|19016|Nexus 5|stepid=53732|new_window=true].
  • Mounted to the display assembly ribbon cable, we see the Synaptics S3351B touchscreen controller.

    • This is likely an iteration of the S3350B found in the Nexus 5.

Add Comment

Image 1/2: The battery is buried beneath the motherboard and adhered to the midframe, hindering its replacement. Image 2/2: The display assembly cannot be replaced without tunneling through the entire phone. This makes one of most common repairs—a damaged screen—very difficult to accomplish.
  • HTC One M9 Repairability Score: 2 out of 10 (10 is easiest to repair)

    • The battery is buried beneath the motherboard and adhered to the midframe, hindering its replacement.

    • The display assembly cannot be replaced without tunneling through the entire phone. This makes one of most common repairs—a damaged screen—very difficult to accomplish.

    • Intense adhesives make many components difficult, and even dangerous, to remove and replace.

    • HTC thought they could Have Their Cake and eat it too, by making a flagship phone that's tough to repair. Sorry HTC, but this design Has To Change.

    • Design streamlining (upper access panel and reduced tape/shielding) makes for slightly easier access to some components.

Add Comment

16 Comments

I was wondering where the accelerometer/gyroscope chip can be found.

Thanks

dhruvbole - Reply

The inside of this phone is a mess! HTC needs to get with the program already!

Sterling Archer - Reply

Does it use the WCD 9330 AUDIO CODEC

Matty Anderson - Reply

It doesnt matter if you never plan on tinkering with your phone. I could care less what it loojs like inside

justin bergmans - Reply

Couldn't agree more...the unibody construction + uh oh protection means you should never have to tear the One open.

Michael Toland -

And for the first year you won't have to, but after your uh-huh protection ends, are you just going to throw away your phone?

cmcrisp -

How to get rid of the ir blaster protection for the 2 screws?

dominik - Reply

just another prime example of planned obselecense......well just send it back to china/inda (burn some more resources),have them recycle the materials (dangerous, and some more resources), get them to use materials to make new phone (more resources), package it (more resources), and ship it back here (using some more resources). Seeing is that it will probably only last a couple of years, this cycle occurs very fast. The environmental impact is disgusting (as is the case with most electronics) ......not an htc problem tho

juice - Reply

A big issue with the M9 construction is cracking at the weak plastic frame/screen bezel that basically holds everything in place. I have seen numerous HTC one M9 s with this crack. Search online 'M9 bezel crack' and you will also find photos. The sad thing is HTC is doing nothing to correct this issue. I like to call this the HTCcrackgate. Could ifixit highlight this build issue?

Farzad - Reply

by changing the battery would this then mean that all data on the phone has a factory reset?

umit caglayan - Reply

Does anyone know if the M9 camera module can be retrofitted to M7? I am about to change it, since it has the "purple" problem.

Thanks.

Toms Bondars - Reply

Is the new HTC 10 any better??

Burke Almquist - Reply

Is it possible to replace the M9 speakers with the M8 speakers? The M9 speakers aren't as loud, are tinny-sounding, and crackle far more often.

Dave - Reply

Can we get the model number(s) on the speakers?

Dave - Reply

Is there any way for me to access the data on my m9 after its been bricked?

Umar Abdullah - Reply

Hi

My HTC one M9 Flash ICE or ICU actually i don't now but in mobile shop they said that's the problem and they can't flash it so please give me a solution or i want to change any parts for this problem

mohamedrio1991@gmail.com please reply to me

Mohamed Ahshan - Reply

Add Comment

View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 60

Past 7 Days: 365

Past 30 Days: 1,609

All Time: 163,470