Heavy-Duty Suction Cups (Pair)

$14.95

Product code: IF145-023-2

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Heavy-Duty Suction Cups (Pair)

$14.95

Product code: IF145-023-2

Product Overview

Get a heavy-duty grip on heavy-duty glass.

  • Large glass panels rarely come with handles—use these suction cups to safely lift and remove glass from LCD screens.
  • Ideal for gaining entry into iMacs and glass-sheathed laptop displays.
  • For smaller displays, like those found in iPhones and iPods, check out our Small Suction Cup.

For years we struggled with finding a reliable source for quality suction cups, so we bit the bullet and made our own. Specially formulated rubber foot sticks stronger and longer.

Product Details

  $14.95 iFixit

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

One year warranty

50+ Available

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Product Videos

 

Stories

My Problem

The current 500GB drive had run out of space, so we upgraded to 4T.

My Fix

Everything went well, however a word of caution. The video cable mount is very tiny and you need small hands to reseat it.

My Advice

You don't need to remove the LCD screen, you can reach the screws that hold the drive in place by simply lifting the screen.

My Problem

The computer had started shutting down randomly.

My Fix

With no prior experience, I used ifixit's website and youtube video to help me repair the iMac. It worked!

My Advice

Watch for falling rocks.

My Problem

My iMac 27" I7 fully loaded audio production tool suddenly died. It would not power up at all and I could hold the power button down and nothing happened. I tried different outlets and power cables just in case. After a few moments of panic started to look online and do some research. I found out that my iMac was a 2011 model that was known to have power issues and a trickling effect of multiple components failing one after the other. I was really worried at that point, and thought it would have to be replaced. I bought it used, and it did not have apple care. I am an experienced computer technician but have rarely ever had to repair any of my Macs, so this was a little troublesome. I found the Ifixit site and began to read up on the failure. I felt it had to be a power issue since nothing happens when you pressed the power button and I found the parts and instructions for replacing the power supply inside the iMac. I ordered the parts and tools and crossed my fingers.

My Fix

The instructions were spot on and fabulous! I had the old power supply out in about 20 minutes and that included reading and rereading the instructions multiple times to be sure I was doing the correct steps. I compared the power supplies once I got the old one out and was a little concerned because they didn't match correctly other than the shape. Coming from a PC world, not having matching parts can cause imminent doom when you power up. But after putting it all back together again, plugging it in, and then crossing my fingers... I pressed the power button. That wonderful familiar sound of the drives spinning up and apple boot noise sounded like music to my ears. It is alive again and kicking.

My Advice

My advice is.... if your iMac won't power up and you don't have any warranty available to have apple fix it, give this a shot. The videos are simple and straight forward, the instructions on pdf are the same, and the parts just work.

My Problem

Original Hard drive failed in my iMac EMC2134. Symptom: On boot up the machine chimed but then the drive made a clicking sound and Startup software couldn't be found, nor any of the startup services with option keys pressed! I was left with a grey screen and a flashing folder with a question mark inside!

My Fix

The hard drive repair was unbelievably straight forward. Anyone that can follow instructions and turn a screwdriver could do It. The only real issue I had was working with the two T-6 screws on the LCD connection. These were short and fiddly to handle. A magnetic tipped driver would come in handy here as the screws fell between and under other components when being replaced and I had to fish them out. Working in a dust free environment is essential for seamless LCD cleaning and screen cover replacement. I used the disk utility on an existing CD ROM of iOSX Snow Leopard to format and partition the drive and then install the operating system, security updates and then upgrade to Yosemite. Perfect, and couldn't be happier!!

My Advice

Don't underestimate your ability to fix your iMac! With great technical directions from ifixit, you can't go wrong!! Happy as a clam and now looking for other items to ifixit!

Only advice is use of a magnetic tipped T-6 driver on the LCD connection as noted above.

My Problem

After 7 years of trusty service my iMac's hard drive flat-lined. I considered going to a repair service but after some web searching I found the ifixit web site and decided to try my chances at replacing the drive myself. (For $150 less why not right?)

My Fix

Bottom line: iMac 2210 had a Western Digital 320GB drive that I replaced with a new WD 1TB drive. I ordered the ifixit repair kit and watched the easy to follow instructional video. These guys know what they are doing because I was able to replace the drive with no real hiccups. Great job with your how to videos and narratives guys. Keep it up!

My Advice

Get yourself the main kit from ifixit's site and follow the video / guides patiently. It will all work out in the end.

My Problem

Computer completely dead as in no visible signs of life.

My Fix

Replaced the power supply. Followed the instructions in the repair guide to the T. If "to the T" means mostly. Took about an hour and 2 Coronas.

My Advice

It gets easier after the second Corona.

My Problem

My 27" Thunderbolt Display started an annoying habit of flickering to a blank screen and sometimes not coming back from sleep. After much online searching I decided to try replacing the built in thunderbolt/magsafe connector cable. I went with this first because if I used an external Thunderbolt patch cable to go from the display to my Macbook, the symptoms disappeared.

My Fix

I was most worried about lifting the glass of the display, but with the suction cups that I bought, it made it a very simple process. A few T10 torx screws later and out came the old cable and in went the replacement.

My Advice

If you are going to try this be sure to buy a new OEM factory cable. It comes with the replacement tapes to hold down cables. Also when lifting the display out of the case let it pivot at the top first so you can disconnect the cables easily before lifting it all the way out.

My Problem

Running Yosemite, my early 2008 iMac had been reduced to a crawl. It would take minutes to boot and even wake from sleep. Mail took forever to load. iPhoto took even longer. Every app spawned spinning beachballs that seemed to never go away. Streaming audio would too often just stop for no reason. My internet connection was irregular, frequently slowing and disconnecting. And then there were those times my machine would just freeze up and require a reboot.

Oh, and my optical drive was broken.

The fix: I took out the broken DVD drive and put a terabyte SSD in its place in the optical bay. I kept my original spinning drive and am now running the iMac with two drives, using the SSD as my boot drive and the original hard drive as extra storage.

My Fix

Following ifixit's guide, I was able to finish this job in three hours. I assembled all my parts and tools in advance, took some breaks, kept meticulous track of the dozens of screws that come out of this machine (using ifixit's magnet project board), drew diagrams of screw placement, took lots of my own pictures, and stayed calm. Some plugs were a little tough to remove, some screws didn't align properly right away, and initially my machine wouldn't even restart, getting stuck in a boot loop--but I figured out solutions to all these little stumbling blocks (respectively by spudging carefully; unscrewing and trying again; and unplugging all my peripherals, booting to the original drive, resetting my startup drive to the SSD in OS X preferences, and restarting the machine. Good to go after that.)

My iMac is now better than new. It runs super fast, booting in seconds and waking from sleep instantly. Mail and iPhoto open and load in seconds, not minutes. The few spinning beachballs that I do see go away in seconds and don't stick around for hours anymore. Most surprisingly, my cable internet connection has gotten a lot faster and more stable with the SSD, now drawing a steady 120 mbps down when it used to just come down at a stuttery 15-50 mbps. And here I was blaming Comcast for that when my old spinning hard drive was the culprit all along....

The new SSD seems to have fixed every single thing that aggravated me about my old iMac.

My Advice

Originally I thought this was the year I would finally get a new iMac. Then I started reading about people installing SSDs in their old machines, breathing new life into them. My old machine just felt like it was running slower and slower (although some routine disk repair had sped things up a bit). I wanted more speed, I realized, not an entirely new machine. So I bought all the parts for this fix and took the plunge into the hidden guts of my Apple computer (I have previously opened up and upgraded ram and even processors in my laptops so I am familiar with opening up computers, but I have never done a fix as involved as this one before).

For a long time I was leery of pulling the glass off of my iMac and doing this project, but that turns out to be one of the easiest steps of this fix (its really cool how the monitor glass attaches to the iMac, by the way).

You can do this fix if you are the one responsible for doing routine maintenance and troubleshooting on your Mac and if you have ever used a screwdriver to open up an electronic device before--especially a computer--to do an upgrade or your own fix. If you have never opened up an electronic device before and/or if you are unfamiliar with how to set up an iMac (as in basic stuff like knowing when and how to plug in cables and configure the boot drive in system preferences), then you shouldn't take this task on just yet.

However, if you are thinking about doing this and are in fact reading this right now, then I figure you are the kind of person who can swap out an optical drive for an SSD. It's a complicated but ultimately very straightforward process.

I do have some advice:

1. Draw a diagram of where all the screws go, especially in the case assembly; not all iMacs of this vintage have the same kinds of screws and it turned out that my machine used not two but three different lengths of screws just to hold the case together.

2. Take pictures of all parts both before you remove them and after you remove them. The pictures in the ifixit guide are good but it helps to have your own too. This came in especially handy when I had to reattach the heat sensor and foam to my SSD and I had forgotten where those parts initially sat on the old optical drive--fortunately I had a picture of that part before I had pried those pieces off it.

3. Get a bunch of little bowls and post-its or, better yet, use ifixit's magnetic project board to organize all your screws. There are a lot of them!

4. Read all the comments on the ifixit repair guide, especially when you get to removing the LCD panel. Don't pull the cable off the circuit board as suggested in the guide; do what the comments say and pull the plug off the back of the LCD panel--or just prop it up if possible or have someone hold it and work under it so you don't have to complete this tricky step at all.

5. Stay calm, take your time, and be meticulous. In some blogs I follow, I read that this fix took under an hour. It took me a lot longer, but that's because I took several breaks and documented my repair with my own diagrams and pictures. I found this fix to be a little tense and even sweaty, frankly, as it involves a lot of concentration and even a small degree of lifting (the iMac is not light)--I kept a towel handy so I didn't drip sweat onto a circuit board.

6. Make sure you have a magnetic-tipped screwdriver so you can retrieve the teeny little screws you will drop into the guts of the Mac. I dropped two :p .

7. Clean the LCD panel and glass (front and back) carefully because they will get covered with fingerprints and worse. I had to take the glass off my iMac after I had it all reassembled because I didn't clean the glass thoroughly the first time. It's funny how easy that felt after doing this fix.

To conclude my tale, I had saved up for a new iMac, but instead of buying the new 5K machine I chose to spend about $600 on parts to upgrade my old one and keep the rest of my money (and spend some of it on really nice headphones and a headphone amp, yes!...). I thought I wanted a Retina display but it turns out what I really wanted was an SSD, and now that I have that I plan to use this machine for as long as I can.

If you are even thinking about doing this fix then just go and do it. Don't wait any longer. And don't buy a new machine. You will be so happy with your old iMac once you get an SSD into it. Plus, this is probably the last time you will be able to do a hack like this on a Mac as the new ones don't let you swap out components like these old ones do.

ps,

8. Ha, one more piece of advice. Put 6 gigs of ram in your machine. Apple claims the early 2008 iMac can take only 4 gig of ram but it really can take 6. OWC sells an upgrade kit: put 4 gig in one slot and 2 in the other.

My Problem

Hard drive full

My Fix

less than 1 hour

My Advice

Excellent tools and instructions. So easy to follow and so much fun. I'd forgotten how cool it is to repair a computer.

My Problem

Glass had cracked. The second replacement glass also cracked on installation.

My Fix

The new, blue suction cups handled the 3d replacement with ease and the client is very happy.

My Advice

The Glass for 27" iMacs is made very thin and requires very careful handling. The new blue suction cups work well. Might also want to get some white cotton gloves to keep any hand oil off the glass.