Introduction

Use this guide to replace the battery.

The battery is made up of six distinct cells adhered to the upper case. Use great care in prying the cells up from the case—bending or puncturing them can damage their performance, and may release hazardous chemicals. Only use plastic tools when prying.

Image 1/1: Two 2.3 mm Pentalobe screws
  • Remove the following ten screws securing the lower case to the upper case:

    • Two 2.3 mm Pentalobe screws

    • Eight 3.0 mm Pentalobe screws

For all the screws you use the P5 pentalobe screwdriver?

Carlos - Reply

Pentalobe is only for the screws on the bottom cover. The Torx screw driver is for the remainder.

hello -

Is the Pentalobe screwdriver mentioned in the tools list? I did not have one so I used a filed down flat blade screwdriver. Not a fantastic idea, but it works.

Alex Birkett - Reply

Yes, it's mentioned on the top of this page. P5 Pentalobe to be precise. I didn't have one either, so I bought one from iFixit and that works fantastic. An absolutely precise fit, which is important especially when you might open your MacBook a couple of times during the years you own it. Not using the correct tool might do more harm to the screws than you want! I once had this with a Lenovo Yoga 3 Pro, which has Torx screws (T4 I think) and I used cheap Chinese quality tools, with the result that both the tool and one of the screws are damaged.

addvariety -

the macbook in the picture is 2012. does it has the same structure as 2013?

Edison - Reply

I never, ever, ever considered using anything but the correct tool on the Pentalobe screws. Too easy to strip and void your warranty (if still in effect), as well as make it almost impossible to get inside later for another upgrade or repair. The Wiha P5 Pentalobe screwdriver fits like a glove and costs only about $11 (a fraction of your drive's price)at Amazon.com. Get it!

marketing - Reply

Image 1/1: Gently pull the lower case away from the upper case to remove it.
  • Wedge your fingers between the upper case and the lower case.

  • Gently pull the lower case away from the upper case to remove it.

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Image 1/2: During reassembly, gently push down the center of the lower case to reattach the two plastic clips. Image 2/2: During reassembly, gently push down the center of the lower case to reattach the two plastic clips.
  • The lower case is connected to the upper case with two plastic clips near its center.

  • During reassembly, gently push down the center of the lower case to reattach the two plastic clips.

There are two screws that are shorter-they go to the back near the vent.

wrbandllm - Reply

This was already mentioned at the start, it says 2x 2.3mm screws and those are coloured red instead of orange for the other ones in iFixit's image.

addvariety - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • If necessary, remove the plastic cover adhered to the battery contact board.

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Image 1/2: Be sure you lift up only on the connector itself, '''not''' the socket, or you risk permanent damage to the logic board. Image 2/2: Be sure you lift up only on the connector itself, '''not''' the socket, or you risk permanent damage to the logic board.
  • Use the flat end of a spudger to lift the battery connector straight up out of its socket on the logic board.

  • Be sure you lift up only on the connector itself, not the socket, or you risk permanent damage to the logic board.

I have a friends MacBook Pro that has some water damage that caused the MacBook not to be able to use battery power, but still work when plugged into A/C. Upon further inspection I can see visible corrosion on a few of the 9 cables going from the battery connector to that small circuit board. Is it possible to just replace that circuit board?

jramsey21 - Reply

I have the some problem. I was thinking to replace the whole battery but I am not it will solve the problem. Any suggestions?

salvatorebarbera -

Sometimes it can be enough to just clean the contacts without having to replace the entire board. Dosent work for complicated IC's like plcc type, where corrosion is underneath the chip. Here you will have to reheat and reapply the IC.

andrehedegaard -

Have either of you replaced the battery and/or circuit board to fix the MacBooks with the water damage ? I have the same problem with the MacBook working fine when connected to power but dying immediately when the power cord is removed.

Steve - Reply

Hi, Steve. I had the same problem: Macbook Pro 15 retina with coffee damage. And it worked fine when connected to power. I made it working after replacing the whole battery. It seems that circuit connected to the battery becomes disabled to prevent short circuit.

Vadim Gribanov -

When placing the battery connector back into the socket on the logic board, check that every part of connector is pressed down. You should hear a soft click when it's back in place.

Ethan Tarquin - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Bend the battery connector up out of the way to prevent accidental contact with its socket during your repair.

If you miss or let this step for later like I did, the power left in the battery even though the computer is completely shut down, will screw up the I/O board cable like I did. I noticed this after I put all the pieces back, turn the computer on and surprise, no wifi hardware is detected. -.-

sebasgaes - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Remove the two 2.1 mm T5 Torx screws securing the logic board end of the I/O board cable bracket.

At this point it's a good idea to take sheet of printer paper, like A4, and press each screw into the paper roughly in the position it was removed from. When it comes time to reassemble it, you wont get the different lengths mixed up.

Martin Gray - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Grasp the I/O board cable bracket with a pair of tweezers and remove it from the MacBook.

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Image 1/2: Be careful to only pry up on the I/O board cable, '''not''' on the socket itself or you risk damaging your logic board. Image 2/2: Be careful to only pry up on the I/O board cable, '''not''' on the socket itself or you risk damaging your logic board.
  • Use the flat end of a spudger to pop the I/O board connector straight up off its socket on the logic board.

  • Be careful to only pry up on the I/O board cable, not on the socket itself or you risk damaging your logic board.

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Image 1/2: To avoid damage to the cable, fold only at the bend in the I/O board end of the cable. Image 2/2: To avoid damage to the cable, fold only at the bend in the I/O board end of the cable.
  • Lift the logic board end of the I/O board cable straight up to bend it out of the way.

  • To avoid damage to the cable, fold only at the bend in the I/O board end of the cable.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Carefully tuck the tip of a spudger under the right speaker cable near the connector and lift it up out of its socket on the logic board.

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Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • Carefully peel the right speaker cable off the upper case.

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Image 1/1: One 5.7 mm T5 Torx screw
  • Remove the following screws securing the right speaker to the upper case:

    • One 5.7 mm T5 Torx screw

    • One 6.5 mm T5 Torx screw

    • One 3.8 mm T5 Torx screw

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Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • Lift the right speaker from the cable end and pull it free from the case.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Insert the tip of a spudger under the left speaker cable near the connector and lift it up out of its socket on the logic board.

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Image 1/1: One 5.7 mm T5 Torx screw
  • Remove the following screws securing the left speaker to the upper case:

    • One 5.7 mm T5 Torx screw

    • One 6.5 mm T5 Torx screw

    • One 3.8 mm T5 Torx screw

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Image 1/3: Be careful '''not''' to snag the speaker cable on the screw hole post in the side of the case. Image 2/3: Be careful '''not''' to snag the speaker cable on the screw hole post in the side of the case. Image 3/3: Be careful '''not''' to snag the speaker cable on the screw hole post in the side of the case.
  • Lift the corner of the left speaker up and slide it out the battery to remove it from the upper case.

  • Be careful not to snag the speaker cable on the screw hole post in the side of the case.

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Image 1/2: Place the iOpener in the center of the microwave. Image 2/2: For carousel microwaves: Make sure the plate spins freely. If your iOpener gets stuck, it may overheat and burn.
  • We recommend that you clean your microwave before proceeding, as any nasty gunk on the bottom may end up stuck to the iOpener.

  • Place the iOpener in the center of the microwave.

    • For carousel microwaves: Make sure the plate spins freely. If your iOpener gets stuck, it may overheat and burn.

which temperature must be used for heating? Thx

fbarletta - Reply

I found you need to be very patient when using the iOpener. It's worth taking your time, giving the heat time to work on the glue. When I finally got the battery out, there were some strips of glue left behind that I just cleaned off with some isopropanol before installing the new battery.

By the way, I had to run the iOpener for longer in my microwave for it to get hot enough. When it was too hot to touch, I figured it was hot enough for the batteries.

hello -

I didn't find this to be as hard as I had built it up in my mind to be; HOWEVER, saying that I need to say years ago I was the local Nokia service center in my town. But many years ago right after they got rid of analog times. Yeah. A classic installer/repairer mistake when starting something they haven't fixed or installed before is picking up the instructions, flipping through them; maybe even reading a section that is new-then tossing the instructions over the shoulder. "I got this." This usually comes right before something major gets broke. And I can tell you when you try to do it yourself and then mess it up horribly then take it to the repair shop. Well we called that "I can do it myself" syndrome and charged extra to put back together what they brought in in the box. Now knowing all this - I can't stress this enough because I am stupid, stupid, stupid. COVER YOUR SCREEN IN CLEAR BOXING TAPE AND READ ALL THE INSTRUCTION BELOW THROUGH TO THE END BEFORE EVEN ATTEMPTING THIS FIX. Take my advise.

windizy - Reply

I didn't have an iOpener, so I used a wheat type heat bag. If you do this though, make sure you put a layer of plastic between your Mac and the bag, or you'll get condensation in places you don't want it.

Martin Gray - Reply

I started out using the iOpener but switched to my wife's hairdryer. A heat gun or hair dryer proved to be much more convenient and is a time saviour. You can heat more and the glue becomes more fluid make the next steps with the opening picks much easier

Jan Van Puymbroeck - Reply

Image 1/1: Throughout the repair procedure, as the iOpener cools, reheat it in the microwave for an additional thirty seconds at a time.
  • Heat the iOpener for thirty seconds.

  • Throughout the repair procedure, as the iOpener cools, reheat it in the microwave for an additional thirty seconds at a time.

  • Be careful not to overheat the iOpener during the repair. Overheating may cause the iOpener to burst.

  • Never touch the iOpener if it appears swollen.

  • If the iOpener is still too hot in the middle to touch, continue using it while waiting for it to cool down some more before reheating. A properly heated iOpener should stay warm for up to 10 minutes.

May I know the temperate limit about heating iOpener? (maximum 150 degrees Celsius?) thx so much.

yamayhuang - Reply

I had to heat mine up for more than 30 seconds. After 30 seconds on high it was only warm. It had to keep trying different times and checking it until it got hot. I think the initial time that I put it in for was over a minute.

whale13 - Reply

DO NOT USE IN NON ROTATING MICROWAVE! It will pop a hole. I had it in for 45 seconds the first time. It wasn't very hot inside and I saw it started to leak on the paper towel I put under it. Just a fair bit of advice. I think I will just stick with the heat gun. Loud but useful.

Alex Jackson - Reply

I don't own a microwave.

mdanihy - Reply

Image 1/1: The iOpener will be very hot, so be careful when handling it. Use an oven mitt if necessary.
  • Remove the iOpener from the microwave, holding it by one of the two flat ends to avoid the hot center.

  • The iOpener will be very hot, so be careful when handling it. Use an oven mitt if necessary.

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Image 1/1:
  • Remove the five 3.7 mm T5 Torx screws securing the battery to the upper case.

In my macbook pro retina, these are some kind of plastic screws. I cannot remove them.

adriendavernas - Reply

The plastic screws just need to be pulled out with a spudger/finger and you're good to go. I have the same model, there's also a screw on the power board not mentioned in this guide, takes a T5 screwdriver/bit

alex - Reply

Question - when putting the new battery back into the case, do we need to remove old glue/add new glue, use no glue at all, or place the battery in and then reheat to melt the old glue so that it will adhere to the new battery? Thanks!

chal740 - Reply

What is the part number for this battery, or where can I find it?

dfreeman110 -

I wish to ask the same question.

vbivanov -

My adhesive didn't have enough tack to hold the battery in. I just reassembled without it and can't hear the batteries moving, but I have the rubber grommets and not screws as MarkB mentioned. Fo future repairers, I'd recommend buying some nonpermanent two sided tape just so you have the option to fasten it in.

Vince Cipriani -

I wish they would find another way of securing the battery, this is ridiculous.

brian whittle - Reply

On each 'corner' of the frame that surrounds the two centre batteries, rather than 'plastic screws' mentioned by adriendavernas there are 'domed' rubber grommets. These presumably rest against the inside of the bottom cover when it is fitted thus supporting the batteries. As there were no screws underneath in these 4 positions, there is no need to remove these grommets. Agree with alex re: removing the extra T5 screw on the power board.

MarkB - Reply

After destroying the adhesive which secures the batteries (bad technique or lack of patience in my effort) what is recommended to secure the batteries when reassembling?

maxB - Reply

Image 1/2: Use the hot iOpener to cover half of the two right-most battery cells. Image 2/2: After about a minute, reheat the iOpener and move it to cover the other half of the right-most battery cells.
  • Throughout this procedure, you'll be using a hot iOpener to warm and soften a section of the adhesive securing the battery to the upper case, and then carefully prying at that point.

  • Use the hot iOpener to cover half of the two right-most battery cells.

  • After about a minute, reheat the iOpener and move it to cover the other half of the right-most battery cells.

I did not have an iOpener. I did not fancy using a heat gun on the batteries either so I used two flat metal spudgers to prise them off the body of the mac book. I hit the spudgers with a small hammer.

Alex Birkett - Reply

I popped the freaking iopener in the microwave following this instruction. Said to heat for 30 secs put on for a minute then reheat after that minute. Then read on the iopener that I shouldn't heat more the once unless after two minutes. Just wonderful.

Jennifer Myer - Reply

Image 1/2: Throughout the procedure, if you encounter any significant resistance to prying, stop and use the iOpener to reheat the section you're working on. Image 2/2: Throughout the procedure, if you encounter any significant resistance to prying, stop and use the iOpener to reheat the section you're working on.
  • Push a plastic card between the right-most battery cell and the upper case, cutting the adhesive between the two.

  • Throughout the procedure, if you encounter any significant resistance to prying, stop and use the iOpener to reheat the section you're working on.

In addition to using the wheat bag/iOpener to loosen the batteries, I found it useful each time I inserted the plastic card under the batteries to give the card a 'wipe' with isopropyl alcohol to ensure that it didn't stick to the adhesive holding the batteries down. it also presumably eases the glue away from the batteries somewhat.

MarkB - Reply

Do the same tools and steps work on a MacBook Pro 15" late 2015 model?

Sean - Reply

Heat can be dangerous to Li-Ion batteries, no???

Alex - Reply

Excessive heat can be dangerous, but the iOpener is designed to never get hot enough to cause permanent damage. Using a heat gun or hot plate could be dangerous, but the iOpener method is the safest one we know of =)

Sam Lionheart -

Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Use the plastic card to pry the right-most battery cell up from the rear case.

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Image 1/3: Push the card about an inch between the battery cell and the upper case, and slowly pry the cell up to separate all of the adhesive. Image 2/3: Push the card about an inch between the battery cell and the upper case, and slowly pry the cell up to separate all of the adhesive. Image 3/3: Push the card about an inch between the battery cell and the upper case, and slowly pry the cell up to separate all of the adhesive.
  • Repeat this procedure with the next battery cell in.

  • Push the card about an inch between the battery cell and the upper case, and slowly pry the cell up to separate all of the adhesive.

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Image 1/3: Reheat the iOpener and reapply it, this time to the left-most battery cells. Image 2/3: Again, leave it in each position for about a minute, reheating in between, to heat each half of the left-most battery cells. Image 3/3: Again, leave it in each position for about a minute, reheating in between, to heat each half of the left-most battery cells.
  • Position the plastic card to keep the two right-most battery cells from re-adhering to the upper case.

  • Reheat the iOpener and reapply it, this time to the left-most battery cells.

  • Again, leave it in each position for about a minute, reheating in between, to heat each half of the left-most battery cells.

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Image 1/3: Gently pry the left-most battery cell up from the upper case. Image 2/3: If you encounter significant resistance, stop and use the iOpener to re-heat the battery cells. Image 3/3: If you encounter significant resistance, stop and use the iOpener to re-heat the battery cells.
  • Insert a second plastic opening tool between the far left battery cell and the upper case, cutting adhesive about an inch deep.

  • Gently pry the left-most battery cell up from the upper case.

  • If you encounter significant resistance, stop and use the iOpener to re-heat the battery cells.

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Image 1/3: Insert the plastic card between the second left-most battery cell and the upper case to cut the adhesive joining the two, and pry the cell up from the case. Image 2/3: Insert the plastic card between the second left-most battery cell and the upper case to cut the adhesive joining the two, and pry the cell up from the case. Image 3/3: Insert the plastic card between the second left-most battery cell and the upper case to cut the adhesive joining the two, and pry the cell up from the case.
  • Continue to repeat the procedure from the right side of the battery.

  • Insert the plastic card between the second left-most battery cell and the upper case to cut the adhesive joining the two, and pry the cell up from the case.

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Image 1/1: In the following steps, you can either use a third card, or the card from the right corner. The right corner adhesive should be cooled enough that it won't resettle.
  • Leave the second card in the corner between the two left cells.

  • In the following steps, you can either use a third card, or the card from the right corner. The right corner adhesive should be cooled enough that it won't resettle.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Insert the card about an inch between the left-center battery cell and the upper case, separating the adhesive between the cell and the case.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Pull the card back out and insert it about an inch between the right-center battery cell and the upper case, separating the adhesive between the cell and case.

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Image 1/3: Pry up on the two center cells to separate the last of the adhesive and remove the battery from the device. Image 2/3: Pry up on the two center cells to separate the last of the adhesive and remove the battery from the device. Image 3/3: Pry up on the two center cells to separate the last of the adhesive and remove the battery from the device.
  • By this point, the outer cells should be free, and you should only encounter resistance from the two center cells. If this is not the case, go back and completely loosen the four outer-most cells from the upper case.

  • Pry up on the two center cells to separate the last of the adhesive and remove the battery from the device.

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Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

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Sam Lionheart

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7 Comments

What is the part number for the mid 2014 13 inch MacBook Pro battery? I see a lot of batteries for sale for the mid 2013 online. Are they compatible?

johnpaeng - Reply

Macbook Pro A1502 not charging after disassembly/assembly (I just wanted to clean the touchpad). MagSafe is orange but the Macbook is not charging - running only when plugged in. MacOS says the battery needs to be replaced - even if it has 82% charged.. I alson tried reset of SMC and PRAM with no effect..

Any advice? Thanks

tommy69 - Reply

Same problem here. Did you find a solution?

Tim Bo -

guys same problem, did you find some solution? @tim_bo @tommy69

Alpay -

Bonjour, mon problème : mon Mac Book Pro 13" 2014 mes pourcentage descende de 2 pourcents toutes les 2 minutes il tiens a peine 3h a votre avis vaut t'il le coup que je change la batterie ?

Merci.

Stryken Strix - Reply

I would advise working to step six, then skipping to step 16. Take the speaker cables and plastic frame, once the screws are out, and gently fold them back. I used a stiff plastic-about the thickness and size of a credit card to work the glue off from under the battery. No heat or alcohol. All together, from opening to closing, a very simple 15 minute job.

I followed the steps and unfortunately the left speaker socket came off of the control board. Which is why I advise not doing the steps between 6-15. Once the side frames and speaker is off, just fold them back and out of the way.

Brij Verma - Reply

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