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Introduction

UPDATE 6/6/18 Someone makes a replacement piece! Masica, thank you for the tip! Look on eBay for “DS-560 shaft” and it came up right away from seller g_loc.

For the workaround you need only a staple, bent straight -- or a straight pin. For the repair with a paperclip you will need two very small flathead screwdrivers for prying and one normal Philips head screwdriver and a pair of pliers or two. You will be removing the outer shells of the two main body pieces, removing a small shaft and bending a paperclip around the shaft to make it fit tightly in place again.

THE PROBLEM: In the front section that you pull up on the gray lever to allow to swivel out about 30 degrees --it's the section that says Epson on the front and has the lights-- a piece went bad in there. Here's the gist-- in order to pull just one sheet at a time, the rollers in the front panel must not move until the last sheet; they provide friction as the scanner pulls the sheets underneath out. What's happened is that one piece that's supposed to hold the roller from moving has failed and the roller now rolls and therefore the whole stack comes through. A small plastic shaft has tabs that have become splayed on one end and won't hold the rollers in place.

It should be easily replaceable -- almost without disassembly, but the Epson parts diagrams don't show this piece separately so I haven't found a place to buy a new one.

  1. This first few step are a WORKAROUND, the repair guide starts at step FOUR. Use this if you're desperate and absolutely need it to scan hundreds of pages RIGHT NOW. Open the front panel by pulling the gray lever as indicated.
    • This first few step are a WORKAROUND, the repair guide starts at step FOUR. Use this if you're desperate and absolutely need it to scan hundreds of pages RIGHT NOW. Open the front panel by pulling the gray lever as indicated.

    • NOTE: One person posted that this worked for them without it jamming and is therefore their permanent fix so try this first.

    • From Saul Rosenthal: "[can do it] without disassembling any of the covers. Go directly to the rollers and remove, then follow removal of the stub shaft for your repair. Assembly required that the DS-510 be put on its side looking down into the access hole and ensure that the interior shaft is there to engage and complete assembly and reinstall rollers."

  2. Inside, on the back of the panel you just opened, you will see two identical foam rollers. Stick a straightened staple or straight pin through the foam so they won't be able to roll anymore once the pin hits the bar between them. NOTE: One person posted that this worked for them without it jamming, so try this first. Inside, on the back of the panel you just opened, you will see two identical foam rollers. Stick a straightened staple or straight pin through the foam so they won't be able to roll anymore once the pin hits the bar between them. NOTE: One person posted that this worked for them without it jamming, so try this first.
    • Inside, on the back of the panel you just opened, you will see two identical foam rollers. Stick a straightened staple or straight pin through the foam so they won't be able to roll anymore once the pin hits the bar between them. NOTE: One person posted that this worked for them without it jamming, so try this first.

    • When you go to scan this way, you'll have to put an extra sheet at the end of your stack that will then "jam" once it tries to scan, since the rollers won't let go of it, but you'll at least get the rest of the papers scanned.

  3. THE REPAIR: There are 4 screws on the front panel's cover that we need to remove, but they're not accessible until you remove that whole panel from the main body of the scanner. The screws nearest where it hinges are the ones that are tough to remove.
    • THE REPAIR: There are 4 screws on the front panel's cover that we need to remove, but they're not accessible until you remove that whole panel from the main body of the scanner. The screws nearest where it hinges are the ones that are tough to remove.

    • If you have a very low-profile ratchet you may be able to get to all four without having to remove the front panel. If so, skip straight to step 7.

  4. find and remove the three screws on the bottom of the main body-- you will need to extend the tray all the way out to access one of them. Then there are three more screws up above, on the main face of the scanner, where you place the sheets to be scanned. One is beneath the replaceable roller, two are behind the gray paper width sliders find and remove the three screws on the bottom of the main body-- you will need to extend the tray all the way out to access one of them. Then there are three more screws up above, on the main face of the scanner, where you place the sheets to be scanned. One is beneath the replaceable roller, two are behind the gray paper width sliders
    • find and remove the three screws on the bottom of the main body-- you will need to extend the tray all the way out to access one of them. Then there are three more screws up above, on the main face of the scanner, where you place the sheets to be scanned. One is beneath the replaceable roller, two are behind the gray paper width sliders

  5. Once that's accomplished you pull the main body of the scanner OUT of its wraparound shell (back, bottom and sides), using a small pry tool to help pop the shell loose around the edges. It's tough plastic so you probably won't break anything, and it's mostly hollow too so don't worry about where the screwdriver goes inside of it while you're prying
    • Once that's accomplished you pull the main body of the scanner OUT of its wraparound shell (back, bottom and sides), using a small pry tool to help pop the shell loose around the edges. It's tough plastic so you probably won't break anything, and it's mostly hollow too so don't worry about where the screwdriver goes inside of it while you're prying

    • Seen here is the shell once the "guts" are out of it.

  6. you will need to remove a screw from each side for the hinges for the front panel and they both have little covers to take off too. you will need to remove a screw from each side for the hinges for the front panel and they both have little covers to take off too.
    • you will need to remove a screw from each side for the hinges for the front panel and they both have little covers to take off too.

  7. THEN you can remove the front panel from the hinges if you start from the RIGHT SIDE (as you face the unit). This takes some finagling. Now except for the cabling, the panel is free of the main and you can expose the screws.
    • THEN you can remove the front panel from the hinges if you start from the RIGHT SIDE (as you face the unit). This takes some finagling. Now except for the cabling, the panel is free of the main and you can expose the screws.

  8. Remove the four screws and use a small flat tool to pop/pry the cover off of the panel. The gray bar that runs inside, that has on it the lever to open the panel-- because of its springs you should keep it attached to the panel and NOT the cover. You can pop it out of its groove in the cover you're removing and thus not need to take the spring off. Remove the four screws and use a small flat tool to pop/pry the cover off of the panel. The gray bar that runs inside, that has on it the lever to open the panel-- because of its springs you should keep it attached to the panel and NOT the cover. You can pop it out of its groove in the cover you're removing and thus not need to take the spring off.
    • Remove the four screws and use a small flat tool to pop/pry the cover off of the panel. The gray bar that runs inside, that has on it the lever to open the panel-- because of its springs you should keep it attached to the panel and NOT the cover. You can pop it out of its groove in the cover you're removing and thus not need to take the spring off.

  9. Remove the rollers from the inboard side of the panel (the ones that are covered in foam, they touch the paper once the panel is closed) and wedge a small flathead screwdriver behind the end of the bad shaft that you can see from that side. Remove the rollers from the inboard side of the panel (the ones that are covered in foam, they touch the paper once the panel is closed) and wedge a small flathead screwdriver behind the end of the bad shaft that you can see from that side. Remove the rollers from the inboard side of the panel (the ones that are covered in foam, they touch the paper once the panel is closed) and wedge a small flathead screwdriver behind the end of the bad shaft that you can see from that side.
    • Remove the rollers from the inboard side of the panel (the ones that are covered in foam, they touch the paper once the panel is closed) and wedge a small flathead screwdriver behind the end of the bad shaft that you can see from that side.

  10. Keep the screwdriver in place as you simultaneously depress the carrier that the rollers were in. That will pop the bad shaft out of its groove. You can only do this while the shaft is turned one particular way, however; otherwise it has tabs that make it too wide to come out of the groove, so you may need to turn it by hand which is not difficult. Keep the screwdriver in place as you simultaneously depress the carrier that the rollers were in. That will pop the bad shaft out of its groove. You can only do this while the shaft is turned one particular way, however; otherwise it has tabs that make it too wide to come out of the groove, so you may need to turn it by hand which is not difficult.
    • Keep the screwdriver in place as you simultaneously depress the carrier that the rollers were in. That will pop the bad shaft out of its groove. You can only do this while the shaft is turned one particular way, however; otherwise it has tabs that make it too wide to come out of the groove, so you may need to turn it by hand which is not difficult.

  11. Using the pliers, tightly wrap a paperclip around the shaft you have removed. Wrap it near the end that is NOT splayed out, then pull it up to the end which IS bad, as you move it up, it will squeeze the splayed ends back in place. Other methods from commenters: heat shrink tubing, small spring (like from a pen), aluminum duct tape,  thin fiber-glass tape impregnated with JB Weld let dry overnight, short length of copper pipe or a plastic straw
    • Using the pliers, tightly wrap a paperclip around the shaft you have removed. Wrap it near the end that is NOT splayed out, then pull it up to the end which IS bad, as you move it up, it will squeeze the splayed ends back in place.

    • Other methods from commenters: heat shrink tubing, small spring (like from a pen), aluminum duct tape, thin fiber-glass tape impregnated with JB Weld let dry overnight, short length of copper pipe or a plastic straw

  12. I used silicon caps (for 5 mm diameter shelf pins) such as the one shown here. Cut the closed end to obtain ~ 0.75 cm length cap and inserted them over the plastic parts at the two joints. It was a snug and secure fit. Inserted the long plastic components from the side shown in the second image and secured in its slot first on the other side before pushing it out with a flat screw driver and inserting it into its slot on this side shown in the image.  It ran smoothly after the fix. It remains to be seen how long it will last.
    • I used silicon caps (for 5 mm diameter shelf pins) such as the one shown here. Cut the closed end to obtain ~ 0.75 cm length cap and inserted them over the plastic parts at the two joints. It was a snug and secure fit.

    • Inserted the long plastic components from the side shown in the second image and secured in its slot first on the other side before pushing it out with a flat screw driver and inserting it into its slot on this side shown in the image. It ran smoothly after the fix. It remains to be seen how long it will last.

    • Another user, Eric Hargis, recommends as another alternative putting an old spring over it

    • Yet another user, lszablya recommended a different twist: "I used double wall heat shrink tubing. Looks like it sucked in around the prongs just fine."

    • The original poster on Amazon who inspired me to try this fix (and if I could find his name I'd give him credit) recommended tightening up the defective piece with some string tightly wound around it and then caulking it to keep the string from getting caught up in things, but I'm doubtful about it holding up long-term.

    • If you're like me, you may wonder why not just glue it to the next shaft in line. Well it actually needs to meet that next shaft at a constantly changing angle, so that will not work.

Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

24 other people completed this guide.

steve

Member since: 08/01/2016

881 Reputation

2 Guides authored

63 Comments

I'm surprised no one else commented on this. Awesome article - worked perfectly. It's a bit tricky and I wouldn't recommend this for a rookie with tools, but it saved me. I couldn't find the part for this thing nor could I find a repair shop to work on it. It's funny how it started clicking 3 weeks out of warranty! THANKS FOR THE POST! and the effort. awesome!

wowonwheels - Reply

thank you very much for posting this. was scratching my head for an hour, after reading your post, took 5 minutes to fix and get it going. what a relief. technical phone support was useless, troubleshooting was useless. scanner would have probably ended up in the trash if not for you. thank you!!!

debbie many - Reply

Excellent advice - the safety pin worked a treat and doesn't even get stuck on the last page now- thank you so much! Strange how the first three comments on this are within a week apart - Our machine is just over two years - limited life span - but lives to scan another day now!

Catherine - Reply

Excellent post! Thank you so much for great instructions. I was able to fix 2 scanners in about an hour. Saved me hundreds of dollars because otherwise I would have had to replace the scanners, now they are as good as new.

Sledder - Reply

This comment is for the next guy that Googles DS-560 disassembly. Thanks for the article!

gregvaughan - Reply

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