PlayStation 3 Yellow Light of Death (YLOD) Fix Kit

$39.95

Product code: IF213-028

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PlayStation 3 Yellow Light of Death (YLOD) Fix Kit

$39.95

Product code: IF213-028

Product Overview

Get your dead PS3 gaming again.

  • All the bits and pieces to fix a Yellow Light'd PS3 (Not PS3 Slims).
  • Designed by our Teardown Techs.
  • Not a guaranteed fix for a Yellow Light PS3, yet this is the best solution short of a full replacement.
  • International option available for non-US customers—we can't ship heat guns out of the country.
  • No Tools option includes enough replacement thermal pads and compound for five YLOD repairs.

Kit Contents:

Compatibility

Identify your console

  • All Sony PlayStation 3 models (excluding PlayStation 3 Slim)

Product Details

$39.95 US Only

 

US Only:

This product only ships to US addresses

Condition:

New

Notes:

Due to voltage requirements and shipping issues this product is only available for shipment to customers in the United States. International orders will be cancelled.

$24.95 International

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

This option does not include a heat gun. A heat gun is necessary for successfully repairing the YLoD.

$49.95 No Tools / 5-Pack

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Fix your friends' PS3s, or start your own repair business! Kit includes materials to preform 5 YLOD repairs. Does not include tools. This item is for customers who have already purchased one YLOD kit with tools.

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Install Videos

 

Compatibility

PlayStation 3
CECHA
CECHB
CECHC
CECHE
CECHG
CECHH
CECHJ
CECHK
CECHL
CECHM
CECHP
CECHQ
 

Stories

My Problem

PS3 YLOD - finally decided it was worth a shot, as I had a couple of games that I wanted to re-play, and Netflix was calling

My Fix

Teardown went OK. My very old model was slightly different from the pictures, but not critically. Had to re-assemble a couple of times to re-seat the ribbon connectors; my first time messing with that style. (And I missed the connector under the WiFi board pulling out entirely the first time)

My Advice

Overall, blah. PS3 worked well enough to spend a couple of hours downloading the latest patches to GTAV, and then died unrecoverably about 6 minutes into a game.

My Problem

So i can play games.

My Fix

Ifixit kit helped and youtube videos.

My Advice

I would say take pictures with your phone. somme screws have specific sizes . I would also say read the whole thing once and watch a video once and then do it step by step. Also MAKE SURE YOU REMOVE THE OLD HEAT TRANSFER PADS B4 YOU ADD THE NEW ONES. THEY TEND TO STICK TO THE MOTHERBOARD AND YOU MIGHT MISS THEM AND PUT THEM BACK ON TOP OF THE NEW HEAT PADS. This is what happened to me so i had to reopen but it was fixable.

My Problem

Somewhere between lazy parenting and my children preferring air conditioning to the hot sun, my PS3 logged a lot of play-time in a hot upstairs room in the dog days of summer. As a result, solder cracked, and I got the dreaded Yellow Light of Death (YLOD) on my first-gen (bulky) PS3, 8 years after I bought it.

My Fix

The difficulty rating on iFixit was right: it was Difficult! They estimated 1 hour, it took me 5. I was very slow and methodical, making sure to do everything right. I was frustrated that iFixit's text guides didn't always match the video guide. For example, I was told in the video to spread the thermal paste using the hard plastic card that came in the kit. In text guides on how to spread the paste, however, I was told to put plastic wrap over my finger and spread with my finger. I found that the latter was an absolute fail: whenever you pull your finger away, you're gonna bring some paste with you, so you don't get an even spread EVER. Gotta go with the card.

Also, "follow the steps in reverse" to reassemble a totally torn-down PS3 is not helpful. I mean, for the most part it's fine, but good luck putting the plastic top cover (not the "smart cover," the one just under it). It's gonna take awhile, there are dozens of spots that have to line up.

My Advice

Don't stray from the guidance with the heat gun. I have friends who have permanently destroyed their PS3s and Xbox 360s by blasting that heat gun on high, or getting too close for too long, or not waiting to let the board cool on a level surface. Also, definitely get a tray of some kind for all those screws.

As for putting that top cover back on, start at the front, angled to get those plastic brackets to line up with the bottom front. As you lower the case, make sure the left and right sides are all parallel. You have to make sure you clear the memory card and bluray areas, and then push back a bit and close at the rear.

My Problem

Ylod. And over heating like a madman. This is an og 60 fat. Have had it since they came out and got it as a gift. It has so much content on it its not even funny. Swapped out the hdd years ago (like 8) run a 750g hdd so its holding up fine. Until I took it apart one day in June to blow it out. Never ran solid again. That's when I thought of your site. I've read your teardowns on cell phones for years ( another passion of mine to take apart and repair). Low and behold you had not only a walkthrough, which I used to clean my ps3, but a repair kit. The rest is history!!

My Fix

Thanks to taking it apart using your walkthrough already numerous times, once the kit arrived the actual repair was a cake walk. Took less then 35 minutes soup to nuts. Plugged it in and legit its super quiet. Like almost new quiet. Couldn't be happier! And now I can continue my love for games with my 6 year old daughter. She and I still play it on rainy days and can do so now thanks to your help!!!

My Advice

Taking things apart is honestly common sense. I have always taken things apart. Just do not let it intimidate you. It's only plactis and metal. Since its already broken anyway you should be calm when you try to fix or see what's wrong with it. Have a good work space first. Arrange each part in order of removal, especially SCREWS. Laying them out like they were removed is a great way to NOT get confused. Take your time and don't rush. Read the walkthrough or teardown or watch the YouTube video multiple times. Most important? Have a blast! Your taking your things into your own hands to fix and get them working better! How much more fun could life be?!?!

My Problem

Discarded PS3 was given to a neighbor who gave it to me when he realized it would not boot up and there was no hard drive in it. A little research led me to iFixIt's walk-through, and I knew there really wasn't much to lose. For less than the cost of a new PS3, this old boy is up and running again.

My Fix

The vents on the exterior of the console were dirty, even fuzzy, so I knew gloves would be a good idea. Not that I DID put any gloves on, but it would have been good. Tear-downs are NEVER as clean as the demo video.

Keeping track of what screws went to which component was a challenge; label those screws!

Pulling off the case was easy. Lots of dust bunnies already. Plus, that really fine dust, tainting everything that brushes against it (why oh why didn't I get some gloves??).

Disc reader pulled out easily, no ribbon or connection damage. First spider corpse found in the fold of the cable. Joyous.

First board pulled up to access the power supply screws it was above. Second, third, and fourth spider corpse found. GLO-O-O-OVES!!

Power supply pulled up and away to the sound like that of very old tape pulled from glass. The sound was not tape, but an elaborate network of spider web (petrified? Does web petrify??) between the power supply and motherboard. Another corpse is here. Not sure if I want to go back to ask where, exactly, this console was kept.

Looked up Haz-Mat responders in the phone book, just in case. Mysteriously, there are none around here.

Pulled the motherboard/fan assembly out. Heat sink appears surprisingly clean, not clogged up that I can see.

Removed the fan.

-so. many. corpses.-

Leave the project for a day and stand at the sink, scrubbing with only the hot tap running. I keep scrubbing but my hands won't come clean.

PUT ON GLOVES to continue with the horror.

The mobo is in fair shape, late second gen CECHE01 model COK-002 (hooray, PS2 compatibility)

The heat pads are all in awful shape, chipped the pieces off of the tertiary chips (saved two very thin strips not in the kit) and cleaned the precious little thermal paste from the CPU/GPU and heat sink (looks to have mostly boiled away, really)

Heated up the motherboard to flow the solder again & let it cool off.

Reapplied the two thin strips and added the rest of the new pads, applied a quarter-inch thick layer of thermal paste to the CPU and GPU (*no* I did not put that much on - sarcasm!) and reassembled the box.

I had doubled the size of the hard drive from original to be 160G, and downloaded the latest fw from Sony to have on a USB to ensure it's up to date.

Powered it on, and heard a nice tune come from the speakers. All has been well, and my concern about the fan possibly not working after its de-corpsification was happily wrong. It spun up quietly and freely.

My Advice

GLOVES. Also, the heat gun provided worked incredibly well, but I would recommend taking it outside to run it for a few minutes before using it on the motherboard. It needs a burn-in moment to clear out the stink of assembly (run on level 1 setting for ten minutes ought to do).

My Problem

I received the YLOD after almost 8 years of pretty solid use. The ps3 was turned on probably almost every day since it was originally purposed. The damage was pretty bad. Mainly since I couldn't put the console into high fan mode (holding down the eject button while turning the main power on) to eject the disc. The internals appears relatively clean with very little dust.

For noting: My ps3 is the 2nd gen backward compatible fat version that came with the MGS4 bundle.

My Fix

I ended up taking the ps3 console apart a total of 4 times.

1) Console tear down to the main internals, but left the pcb inside of the metal plates. Heatsink and fan still attached. I used a air compressor to blow out all of the dust. Reassembled the console, but resulted in continued YLOD.

2) Console tear down and removed the pcb board, fan, and heatsink. I used 99% isotropic alcohol to clean the board and most of the chipsets. Removed all of the hardened thermal paste from the cpu/gpu and heatsink. Applied new thermal past to the cpu/gpu and thermal pads. Reassembled the console, but results again were still YLOD.

3) Console tear down and removed pcb again. This time I used the included heat gun in the ifixit kit for YLOD. Going over the whole board to prevent centralized heat expansion. Then focusing heat on the cpu/gpu for about 1 minute. Removed and reapplied thermal paste to the cpu/gpu again. Reassembled the console, but still resulted in YLOD.

4) Last attempt. Console tear down and removed the pcb board again. This time I removed the heat spreaders from both the cpu/gpu. Using a razor blade to cut the therm paste from the spreaders and the actual die chip. Cleaning up the old thermal paste as usual. The import part here is to use liquid flux. I added some heated up the pcb board again then tilted the board about 45 degrees. Then applied liquid flux (using the pen style) to top side of the cpu/gpu chipsets. Focus on getting the flux under the chip not on top. Using the heat gun again to focus low heat for about 1-2 minutes. This will allow the flux to drain underneath the chip. Do this for all 4 sides of both the cpu/gpu. After applying the flux use the alcohol to clean up any excess flux that remained on the outside of the chips. Applied new thermal paste and put back on the heat spreaders. Applied new thermal paste to the heat speaders and heatsinks again. Reassembled and finally the ps3 turned back on.

Woot!

My Advice

The guide should be updated to include the possible need/use of liquid flux. It worked wonders for me. Also, there should be some clarification on using both liquid no clean liquid flux vs. the paste kind. I personally used the liquid version, but I am sure there is a place and time for the paste type.

latenytelova's Story Photo #600137
latenytelova's Story Photo #600141
latenytelova's Story Photo #600144

My Problem

My original 60G CECHA01 backwards-compatible PS3, which I bought back in 2006 with an extended 2 year warranty, got the first YLOD in June 2010. I sent it back to Sony for repairs while they were still servicing that particular model, and I paid a total of $180 since the extended warranty had expired. OUCH! - P.S, I don't recall Sony offering more extended warranties for that 60G model after my extended warranty had expired. Anyways, after receiving back my PS3 from Sony, 5 years later, July 2015, The YLOD strikes again! So, I went online looking for a solution and came across IFIXIT.

My Fix

The repair process went pretty good. I was very intimidated since I have never repaired an electronic device my life. Taking the PS3 apart and looking at every step in the IFIXIT guidelines was very helpful. On the other hand, putting the PS3 back together following the IFIXIT guidelines backwards like it says, it was no easy task for me, because I did ran into three minor issues along the way. But YouTube came to the rescue right in time and I was able to solve those problems.

My Advice

Take your time and follow everything in order. And what I mean by that is when you take a component off the device; write it down in case you forget. Take a picture of everything you do and what parts you took apart. For example, when I took a part off, I left the screws in place so I know where the screws went instead of trying to figure out which were which and where to put them back. Watch out for those ribbon cables and their sockets as well because you don't them broken when putting the system back together.

My Problem

PS3 original 60gig backwards compatible turned off while I was watching netflix, then wouldn't turn on again. After some research I learned it was the YLOD! I'd never heard of that before. I did research found the ifixit site, bought the YLOD repair kit and attempted the repair.

My Fix

The repair went as the video guide shows. I was watching it to keep track of what I was doing. This was my first time tearing down anything as big, complicated, and loved as my PS3, so I was a bit nervous. I was a little annoyed that the video off the site was not of the original backwards compatible model as there are some slight differences. Luckily I found another manual on the site of a teardown of an original model so I toggled back and forth between the video and the teardown pics which made it more foolproof and me more confident. The only problem I had during the repair was with the blue screw keeping the HDD in it's cage. Not only would it not budge, but it broke a screw bit while I was trying to get it out...my constant trying to budge the immovable screw caused me to strip it. The only way to move forward was to drill out the screw. Once I had the screw out I was able to continue with the repair. Everything else was fairly smooth.

My Advice

Once the PS3 was back on, the fan was much quieter than I've ever remembered hearing it. That makes me assume it's cooling much more efficiently. So that's great! The only problems are that it won't connect to WiFi anymore and the controllers won't work on the system unless they are plugged into the console. Did some more research and found out that either I closed it back up without reconnecting all the cables (don't believe this is it), or while I heated the mother board to reflow the solder on the processor the solder points for the wifi/bluetooth connections detached. It looks like either way, I'm tearing it down again and having to clean off and redo the thermal paste... Anyone have any advice on how to heat the motherboard to fix one problem without causing more problems?

My Problem

YLOD - Thought my PS3 was dead (thrash) but with the kit and manual on-line solve the problem.

My Fix

PS3 is working as good as ever and sure beats buying a new one! It took longer to do than I thought it would take but just took my time to make sure I did it right the 1st time. Fired it up and works great!

My Advice

It was worth the risk to fix it at such a low price versus buying a new PS3. Just take your time - make sure to buy a can of air to blow dust out of all parts and clean as you go. I used zip lock bags and put screws in them marking step 1 thru 10 & next bag 11 thru 20 & so forth so. I would also lay everything out in line as I took it apart and then just went backwards to assemble. It was worth the gamble!!

My Problem

It went out with a rented disc in it so had to get it out

Did accomplish that much. Lasted a couple hours first time 2nd time didn't get thru the updates

My Fix

The repair went pretty easy....both times but didn't last

Did have to interpret the guide a little as mine was a "G" without PS2 unit or memory readers

My Advice

Would like to know how many of these last any time?