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Released November 2020, the PS5 console features vastly upgraded visuals and an innovative new Dualsense controller. The space-age black-and-white color scheme is a noticeable departure from PlayStation designs of the past.

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100V ~ 3.55A 50/60MHz input Playstation 5 for 220v plugs

long story short, I live in Argentina, I got myself a Ps5 from Japan (CFI-1200A), voltage input is 100V ~ 3.55A 50/60MHz, electricity here runs at 220v 50Hz.... can I plug it to the wall? Seller says yes, internet says mixed responses, what should I do?

EDIT:

So, after comunicating with Sony Japan (which was a tedious task due to having to use google translator since no english speaking employee was present at the time), they told me that CFI-1200A model has a psu rated for 100v, so overseas usage wasn't possible, and they didn't adviced using a transformer (i assume it's as a disclaimer in case something gets damaged)... Sooo, I took the risk and used one (750W), and was able to play for like 3 hours, wires, transformer and PS5 were pretty cool, so I think everything is looking good.

I'm yet to open the console and check if the psu is dual voltage or not, but taking in consideration what the japanese dude told me, it seems it is not.

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Hey I also just bought a PS5 from Japan and brought it to Argentina. I was wondering if you had any issue since your last update?

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Hey antonella, I'm not sure if you are argentinian, but Just in case I'll answer in english... nope, I didn't have any issues, what worked for me was to buy an allegedly good transformer, I usted it fine for like 2 straight monthes nearly non-stop

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Great! Yeah I'm Argentinan, did you buy the alleged good transformer here or in Japan?

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OK, let's keep it in english in case someone finds it useful. I bought one in an Electronics hardware store! Do you happen to have the model? You can find it both in the box and the console itself

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@celalyvan Yes! you can use it in a 200-240V environment. Just like always the Sony PlayStation series uses a power supply that is universal voltage. INPUT VOLTAGE: 100-127V, 4.5A 50/60Hz 200-240V, 2.3A 50/60Hz; Output voltage: +12V, 31A.

You may just need to find a power cord that fits your outlet :-)

Update (01/13/24)

@celalyvan that is correct. All labeling is done in accordance with whatever country it was issued too. So this one was issued in a market that uses 100-120V and this has the stickers etc according to that. The same PS 5 issues to the European market will have to have the 220-240V stickers on it. Identical hardware but legal requirement is to label it according to the country it was issued to.You can take it apart and check the actual power supply. You will see that it uses a dual voltage supply.

Of course, that has already been done for you by iFixit. Check the teardown PlayStation 5 Teardown step 10 and you will see this

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You need to check to be sure but this is almost always the case on most devices. It's cheaper to to use a SMPS over a linear supply, making linear reserved for edge cases you have no choice.

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well but where can i check it, because everywhere i've seen in the box, the console, and the manual, everywhere it says it's 100v!!

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@celalyvan that is correct. All labeling is done in accordance with whatever country it was issued too. So this wpone was issued in a market that uses 100-120V and this has the stickers etc according to that. The same PS 5 issues to the European market will have to have the 220-240V stickers on it. Identical hardware but legal requirement is to label it according to the country it was issued to.You can take it apart and check the actual power supply. You will see that it uses a dual voltage supply.

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I tried, but i don't have the tools to access the inner parts, i think i will wait till monday and leave it to the technitian, Just in case

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@celalyvan your call :-) Go get the right power cable and enjoy your console. Ir's awesome !!!

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The approach Sony took is uncommon, but it's compatible. Now, there WAS a time you had to know (Ex, PS1/PS2) due to the use of linear power supplies, but the PS4 and PS5 are using the same global power supply across all models due to cost. It's more cost-effective for Sony to use the same part but "localize" it by changing the label; for example, if you were in Japan, it would say 100-120V (Japan has a weird power grid with some areas being 100V, others being 120V). As such, it's commonplace for the Japanese version to mention this, but it's not mentioned in a country like the US, where we use 120V. That said, all of the PS5s use the same 100-240V SMPS.
It's the same as if I buy a Sony camera from the UK/EEA or from another country where I can toggle it to English (and it's not the KR camera, which is almost as bad as the J1 but at least offers English), mostly; if I get the original power supply, I DO need to replace the power cord with a US cord since Sony has 2 adapters: US/CAN and ROW for easy regional changes (power cord in box), but I can use it being it's a 100-240V global SMPS supply. The reason they do this for ROW cameras is cost, but fix the plug on the US adapter for cost for similar reasons. How it effectively works is if I buy a UK/EEA camera and import it to the US, it will come with 2 UK plugs, as some areas use one or the other, with an IEC connector compared to the US/CAN fixed prong variant. One cord is likely a waste, but it's cheaper for Sony to include both to avoid the additional cost of sending the correct plug for areas that don't use the traditional UK plug. In this case, it's just a nuisance issue I can solve with my boxes of wires.

Most manufacturers label it 120-240V in the US (note: Others label it 100-240V here, but it can usually do 100V in Japan if it has to; Japan's power grid is just weird, with some areas being 100V or 120V).

What Canon did on that charger (as an example) is true "global" labeling. This type of label is far more common than what Sony did, but caution is REQUIRED around buying the camera, for example, given that Sony is willing to lock everything out but Japanese on JDM variants of the body ("J1") to discourage importing not meant to be exported.
(Note: Sony "Overseas" models from the Japan Sony Stores are fully unlocked with all 36 languages) for export outside of the one they sell directly to the customer in Japan when it was new.

None of this behavior shocks me as Sony has always been a bit petty with the grey market and makes the things to watch for known, not a liability. They do the usual industry BS like refusing to repair modchipped consoled (despite making it a REQUIREMENT to own a Japanese PS1/2 without hacky nonsense, for example, due to the region lock) but have come to realize you don't make friends by being a pain in the rear end; just annoy people. Sony is still hostile to the grey market, but far less; Nikon took Sony's trophy there tenfold in a lot of ways for the cameras. Consoles have largely been region-free for 10+ years (except the PS2 compatibility layer on the PS3). It's critical with newer Sony bodies you know too since 2018+ can no longer be tweaked by anyone but Sony. Lenses are a complete non-issue as the lens you buy in Japan will work on a US camera body and be marked the same.

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wow dude, you seem to know what you are talinkg about haha, however, I was talking about this topic with a friend and he told me that in brazil they had non dual-voltage consoles... so that is kinda putting me off of giving it a try. I think I'll wait till tomorrow, and go to an official technitian here in my city and have a more "reliable" opinion, and if my console ends up burning or wtv, i'll complain to him lol

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@celalyvan When Japan has deals like no other at times for things like lenses and cameras that aren't ruined by the J1 coding (as well as your best chance to own film era Minolta lenses which work just as well if not better on the E-Mount Sony bodies with the adapter) you figure out what's low risk vs high risk to import and what you can't reuse with these imported cameras.

It's because we get a super generous ~$1,500 limit before duty becomes a problem in the US. I grew up with imported phones too because the cost to bring the unlocked version of the US version of the phone was nearly the same, but came with drawbacks such as the Euro 3G bands not working in the US and limited support with the grey market phone.

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ok, little update, I contacted customer service from Japan, and this is their response: "We apologize for the inconvenience, but it is possible to take the Japanese model PS5 overseas, but as the voltage, safety standards, and TV broadcasting systems differ depending on the country and region, we do not recommend using the Japanese model PS5 overseas. Is not ...

Although the Japanese model and overseas model have the same shape, the internal specifications are different.

The main unit is a precision device designed to meet the voltage and safety standards of each country or region, so

using it outside of the country may lead to serious accidents or equipment failure. I can not do it." (using google auto translation). They don't advice using a transformer either since they have never tested that combination, so I'm gonna take the risk and give it a shot.

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@celalyvan That’s like saying Sony thinks I’m awful for importing a camera from the UK and you shouldn’t do it 😂. Of course, because I know you can get a better deal by importing it due to the fact people are shy about grey market goods if you get the right one. Warranty is a non issue because it almost certainly left warranty when I bought it from its home country years ago prior. I’m just making the warranty divorce final by taking it in from the UK by being a US resident.

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