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Introduction

If you’re looking for our teardown of the PlayStation 5, you’re in the right place—you’ll find it right here shortly after launch day! In the meantime, check out this preliminary dive into the PS5’s new DualSense controller, and get a load of our previous PlayStation teardowns:

While you count down the days with us, be sure to follow iFixit’s YouTube channel, our Instagram, and our Twitter, and subscribe to our newsletter to be the first to know about our latest gadget investigations.

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your PlayStation 5, use our service manual.

  1. A brand new generation of consoles arrives in just days, and we can hardly contain our excitement. The last fully-fledged, whole-number PlayStation launch was in November, 2013—the same year "selfie" was added to the dictionary. An eternity in tech years, in other words.
    • A brand new generation of consoles arrives in just days, and we can hardly contain our excitement. The last fully-fledged, whole-number PlayStation launch was in November, 2013—the same year "selfie" was added to the dictionary. An eternity in tech years, in other words.

    • Thankfully, we haven't much longer to wait. Keep your eyes on this space! And if your trigger fingers get itchy, just scroll down a bit.

  2. The main course hasn't arrived yet, but appetizers are served in the form of the new DualSense controller. Don't spoil your dinner, though. There's enough new stuff packed in to make this a meal on its own: Space-age adaptive triggers, a top-of-the-line haptic system, larger trackpad, USB-C charging, a very nifty grip pattern, and so much more.
    • The main course hasn't arrived yet, but appetizers are served in the form of the new DualSense controller.

    • Don't spoil your dinner, though. There's enough new stuff packed in to make this a meal on its own:

    • Space-age adaptive triggers, a top-of-the-line haptic system, larger trackpad, USB-C charging, a very nifty grip pattern, and so much more.

    • The "Shock" has been dropped from the name, but its shock to the gaming industry will no doubt remain substantial.

    • Before we get started in earnest, an FYI: if you prefer to digest your teardowns in video form, you can also check out the video version of this teardown over on our YouTube channel.

  3. The new design is so sleek that there are exactly zero visible screws. Looks like Sony is making us work for it... We aren't fazed though—where there's a seam, there's a way! The black trim cover around the joysticks unclips with ease, revealing two screws near the tips of the handles. Surely there are a couple more screws somewhere.
    • The new design is so sleek that there are exactly zero visible screws. Looks like Sony is making us work for it...

    • We aren't fazed though—where there's a seam, there's a way! The black trim cover around the joysticks unclips with ease, revealing two screws near the tips of the handles.

    • Surely there are a couple more screws somewhere.

    • Aha! Two more screws are hidden under the L1 and R1 buttons, which come up with a little clip-prying (and potential flying).

  4. Liftoff! Four Phillips screws and some clips are the only things standing between customers and an open DualSense controller. Not bad. Just like the DualShock 4 and DualShock 3 before it, the DualSense battery has a tough plastic shield and is not glued in place. For sheer battery-swapping serviceability, this beats almost any modern smartphone (though not quite all of them).
    • Liftoff! Four Phillips screws and some clips are the only things standing between customers and an open DualSense controller. Not bad.

    • Just like the DualShock 4 and DualShock 3 before it, the DualSense battery has a tough plastic shield and is not glued in place.

    • For sheer battery-swapping serviceability, this beats almost any modern smartphone (though not quite all of them).

    • This grey monolith clocks in at 5.7 Wh. That's a sizable increase from the DualShock 4's 3.7 Wh pack, and there's a good reason for that extra juice: something has to power all this crazy new tech.

    • The new DualSense cell is more in line with the 5 Wh pack in Nintendo's Switch Pro Controller, which is also pretty easy to replace.

  5. Next up, out come the guts: button sensors, motherboard, haptic drivers, and adaptive triggers, all mounted to a black midframe. From this perspective, it's pretty clear how much faith Sony has in the DualSense's fancy upgrades. Half of the internal volume is dedicated to the triggers and haptics! Both adaptive trigger assemblies connect with cables, but the haptic drivers, USB-C port, and joysticks are all held down by soldered connections.
    • Next up, out come the guts: button sensors, motherboard, haptic drivers, and adaptive triggers, all mounted to a black midframe.

    • From this perspective, it's pretty clear how much faith Sony has in the DualSense's fancy upgrades. Half of the internal volume is dedicated to the triggers and haptics!

    • Both adaptive trigger assemblies connect with cables, but the haptic drivers, USB-C port, and joysticks are all held down by soldered connections.

    • On the backside lives the main circuit board. And where there's a circuit board, there are chips:

    • SIE CXD9006GG — Likely a custom Sony chip doing all the grunt work

    • Dialog DA9087 PMIC

    • Realtek ALC5524 audio codec

    • Nuvoton NAU8225 3.0 W Class-D Audio Amplifier

  6. Let's dig into this classified alien tec—er, variable resistance trigger. The trigger works normally without any of the mechanics active, making contact with a button on the blue ribbon cable. But if game developers choose to, they can program the controller to precisely adjust how difficult the trigger is to pull. The silver motor spins the white worm gear, which drives the black lever arm up and provides resistance to the trigger’s lever action, adding another level of feedback to the controller.
    • Let's dig into this classified alien tec—er, variable resistance trigger.

    • The trigger works normally without any of the mechanics active, making contact with a button on the blue ribbon cable. But if game developers choose to, they can program the controller to precisely adjust how difficult the trigger is to pull.

    • The silver motor spins the white worm gear, which drives the black lever arm up and provides resistance to the trigger’s lever action, adding another level of feedback to the controller.

  7. Let's take a quick deep dive on these triggers: First up, the button sensors—R1 on the left and R2 on the right. R2 seems to use a "two-stage" sensor to differentiate partial and full trigger pulls, while R1 is a plain-Jane digital switch. Next, the plastic frame, metal pin, and spring. These pieces perform the non-adaptive R2 trigger action, without the rest of the fancy parts.
    • Let's take a quick deep dive on these triggers:

    • First up, the button sensors—R1 on the left and R2 on the right. R2 seems to use a "two-stage" sensor to differentiate partial and full trigger pulls, while R1 is a plain-Jane digital switch.

    • Next, the plastic frame, metal pin, and spring. These pieces perform the non-adaptive R2 trigger action, without the rest of the fancy parts.

    • The gear system works together as demonstrated in the previous step: the white worm gear (from the green bullet below) spins the circular gear, which drives the arm up to resist R2's lever action.

    • The white gear housing holds all the gear components together. The silver motor sticking out the bottom drives the worm gear. Its leads are soldered to the trigger module's circuit board (up next).

    • Finally, a circuit board to bring it all together! There are two ribbon cable connections: one to the buttons, and one to the motherboard. The black encoder measures the rotation of the circular gear from the yellow bullet.

  8. With all the easily replaceable parts out, we're down to the soldered-on bits. First off are the two Foster-branded voice coil actuators driving the haptics system. Did someone say pallesthesia?
    • With all the easily replaceable parts out, we're down to the soldered-on bits.

    • First off are the two Foster-branded voice coil actuators driving the haptics system.

    • Did someone say pallesthesia?

    • And next: the two joysticks. These look basically identical to the Alps-brand sticks from the DualShock 4.

    • Compared to these, a Joy-Con joystick replacement is a breeze. PlayStation joysticks are certainly less prone to drift than the notoriously drifty joy-cons, but soldering them on is a big miss.

    • And finally, the USB-C port. Another high-wear component that we'd much prefer to see easily replaced.

  9. This new DualSense controller is a pretty complex piece of tech, a perfect appetizer. Now we're definitely ready for the main course: stay tuned to iFixit.com and our YouTube channel for our full PlayStation 5 teardown...
    • This new DualSense controller is a pretty complex piece of tech, a perfect appetizer.

    • Now we're definitely ready for the main course: stay tuned to iFixit.com and our YouTube channel for our full PlayStation 5 teardown...

    • ...or if Xbox is more your speed, check out our complete Xbox Series X teardown. It's pretty cool.

  10. Update: Our PS5 has arrived, and our analysis has begun! We already compared it to the Xbox Series X in a heated showdown for best console of 2020. Check back soon the full PlayStation 5 teardown, and in the meantime let us know in the comments what you'd like us to investigate. Check back soon the full PlayStation 5 teardown, and in the meantime let us know in the comments what you'd like us to investigate.
    • Update: Our PS5 has arrived, and our analysis has begun! We already compared it to the Xbox Series X in a heated showdown for best console of 2020.

    • Check back soon the full PlayStation 5 teardown, and in the meantime let us know in the comments what you'd like us to investigate.

16 Comments

would be real cool if you took apart those chonky vibration motors :^)

Elliott - Reply

I’m really interested in the PS5’s cooling. Sony definitely made a big deal about the liquid metal thermal interface in one of their videos. I think they put a black sponge around the die to keep excess liquid metal from spilling everywhere though. Definitely worth taking a look at.

Ethan Zuo - Reply

ifixit teardowns perfect & professional

namek al kubtan - Reply

It’s pretty interesting that the vibration traducers are made by Foster. They are primarily a manufacturer of speakers and headphones. I wonder if they make anything for Sony’s other consumer products divisions. It makes sense anyway, since they’re basically just speakers without cones.

Adam Minter - Reply

What is the dimensions of the battery?

Ali Pho - Reply

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