Home security system with 24/7 surveillance capabilities released 2015. Indentified by model number NC1102ES

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Cut and repair the power cable to the outside nest cam?

I bought the outside nest cam but the connector is like 3/4 around. Trying to fish that through the soffit is quite hard. I'm pretty technical but cutting the power supply and repairing on a $250 camera seems somewhat risky if I mess it up. My question is on the line that is connected to the camera if I cut it is it easy to repair?

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Hi KSK1LL3R,

I was wondering if you had any updates with what you decided to do? I'm also in a similar predicament where I would prefer not to drill a 7/8" hole in my wall to mount the Nest Cam Outdoor. Did you end up cutting the cable or opening the camera itself? If you have any tips it would be appreciated. I'm quite disappointed that Nest did not consider this issue when they designed the product.

Thanks.

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What is the wire gauge for the two power wires?

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I used a small iPhone type USB adapter plug (i.e., an AC/DC power adapter plug) for the cable that is hardwired to the Nest Cam. The adapter was plugged into a standard line voltage receptacle. Alternatively, one could install a receptacle with both line voltage and USB charger ports.

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well, that is not easy at all

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I am having trouble stripping the 2 center wires, what is recommended to remove the white & green coating on the center wires so I can wrap them back together? I have already done one camera and reconnected the wires, I am just having a hard time stripping the center wires on this second camera and have already lost length after cutting a few times due to cutting one of the center wires each time.

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Hi,

Depending on how unobtrusive you want the power cable entry to be, the installation video for the Nest cam outdoors says to use a 7/8" drill to get the power plug through the wall etc.

OR

As it is only a low voltage cable, (as the adapter from the AC outlet is connected to the camera power cable by what looks like a USB type connector), my suggestion is that you open the Nest Cam camera unit, take a picture of the power cable connections then un-solder/unscrew (not sure how it is terminated in the unit) and remove the power cable from the camera unit so that you can then feed the power cable from the inside through a smaller hole in the soffit by attaching it to a stiff length of suitably sized draw wire (straightened out coat hanger and electrical tape?)and pulling it through from the outside then re-terminate the cable back in the camera unit as per the picture you took earlier. You won't have 'cut' the cable per se merely disconnected and reconnected it in the camera unit.

No doubt doing this will probably void the warranty but cutting and splicing the cable most probably will as well.

Here is a link the the Ifixit guide on how to replace the motherboard in a Nest Cam camera unit. Hopefully it may be of some help (given that it is the same as the outdoor unit) in showing how to open the camera unit so that you can gain access to the cable connections.

Nest Cam Motherboard Replacement

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Thought I'd add this to help anyone who is struggling to fit this stupid design of a plug through there wall. It is a rediculous idea to put a plug on if this size especially when 99% of people are gonna want push it through the wall. Your cams are the bollox. So, fitted my 3 outdoor cams today. Cut straight thought the wires! There a 4 wires. Two main power and two in the middle for video feed and sound. All colour coded so easy to put back together! The two middles are surrounded by an earth wrap. Just twist this up into a strand. Join everything together and use good insulated tape. All 3 of mine work fine. Yes they are now not warranted . They never break. Had my last 5 cams 3 years. On constantly. Hope this helps.

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Wondering what the function is of the video and sound wire because they are not used at all with the standard connector box or 220V plug?

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I am having trouble stripping the 2 center wires, what is recommended to remove the white & green coating on the center wires so I can wrap them back together? I have already done one camera and reconnected the wires, I am just having a hard time stripping the center wires on this second camera and have already lost length after cutting a few times due to cutting one of the center wires each time.

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I had the same problem and decided to go for cutting the cable. I first bought an USB extension cable to test the procedure. And you know what? Nest Outdoor Cam only uses the red and black power wires and not the green and white data wires. So I cut the cable, drilled an 8 mm hole and inside the house joined the red and black wires again. The cam works like a charm!

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So what exactly are the two center wires for. What do I lose by not hooking them up?

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Just cut the cable myself and only had to drill a 10mm hole and then used a wire connector for added safety. I'm a DIY novice and was a little nervous but can confirm it works. Be careful with the video and audio wires as there thinner so easier to cut altogether when you just want to peel back the plastic insulating.

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image before I put the connector in the box that came with it, which I then screwed to the wall (98p from Screwfix). I've tweeted Nest with the issue, hopefully they'll start to offer two cables in the future.

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I am having trouble stripping the 2 center wires, what is recommended to remove the white & green coating on the center wires so I can wrap them back together? I have already done one camera and reconnected the wires, I am just having a hard time stripping the center wires on this second camera and have already lost length after cutting a few times due to cutting one of the center wires each time.

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I want to go through the wall and then extend the wire 200ft to the end of my yard.

Q = Do you think there will be any issues with power that distance?

Q= Would I be better putting some kind of car battery down there? for the power wires?

Q = which 2 are the power wires?

Obviously I also have to extend my wifi range...

Thanks Ben Montclair USA.

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You need to look into a PoE (Power Over Ethernet) solution, it will allow up to 328' which should get you where you want but you may need to relocate your router if the cam is not in range, maybe near the closest window. https://www.amazon.com/WS-POE-USB-Kit-Ta...

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I’m using this PoE to USB adapter for the Nest Outdoor Cam in place of a PoE camera mounted to the outside back wall of the house. Note that it’s the regular outdoor cam, Not the IQ. It works great. I used a round outdoor junction box to fit the adapter in. Just so happens tha you can turn the Nest cam USB end through one of the threaded holes in the junction box and it makes for a perfect seal as the box actually threads the adapter as you turn it through. I put mine in about 2/4 of the way. I also had to take the PoE adapter out of its case to fit it all in the junction box but it still works great. Now my issue is to shorten the cable because I can’t fit it all in the box. I think I’ll cut, solder and shrink wrap it.

Thanks all for bringining the topic up and taking the risk on cutting the cable!

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Yes, the large, permanently attached USB connector requiring a 7/8” hole is ugly and poor design practice. Also way off the mark is Nest’s idea of using a within-reach outdoor 120 volt outlet (unless the outlet is high up under an overhang). It’s also obvious that Nest’s engineers never owned a structure and realized one has to weatherproof exterior holes to keep out moisture, insects and other varmints out of structure walls.

This method is for powering your camera from inside your house. It allows relatively easy removal/replacement of the camera without modifying the permanently attached USB cable and USB plug (and probably voiding your warranty). Admittedly, it’s UGLY but it does work effectively.

Materials Needed (from any good hardware store):

  1. 1” PVC LB (aka “condolet”)
  2. Tapered rubber stopper to fit the bottom hole of the LB (like what you used in high school chemistry class).
  3. Silicon rubber seal (RTV) or siliconized water-clean up caulk (“Alex Plus”). RTV is better, but a mess to apply or clean up; “Alex Plus” works quite well and can be cleaned up with water.

Method:

  1. Make a clean 1-1/8” hole in your exterior wall and line up a 7/8” hole in your interior wall. Make the exterior hole just large enough so that the LB fits very tightly into the exterior wall (you may have to use a hammer gently to insert the LB into the wall). When you are satisfied with the hole, remove the LB and apply the caulking around the outside circumference of the LB hole on the back side of the LB itself. Ditto to the inside circumference of the hole you just made in your exterior wall (an index finger work best).
  2. Using a sharp knife (or even a kitchen serrated knife), make a v-shaped slot in the “side” of the rubber stopper, just deep enough for the flat camera wire to clear the “edge” of the stopper.
  3. Insert the stopper into the bottom hole of the LB.
  4. One the camera is tested and exterior cable clamps are in place, you can cover the inside hole using a single-gang blank outlet plate. Simply file a small notch for the flat cable at the bottom of the plate. You can attach the plate to the wall using small sheet metal screws, or more professionally attach the plate to the wall, using a “single-gang low voltage box”: https://www.amazon.com/Thomas-Betts-SC10...

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