Announced in March 2015, and released April 10, 2015, the Galaxy S6 is the next flagship in the Galaxy line. The curved screen version is known as the Galaxy S6 Edge.

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My phone fell into water

my phone fell into water and can i get it repaired?

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Abid Rahman safe the rice for some cooking. It does no good in electronic repair. It is a big myth and is equivalent to doing absolutely nothing. Remove the battery and do not try to charge or to use your phone. It is time to disassemble your phone. Use these guides to work on your phone. Once you have it open and disassembled, clean everything with high grade (90%+) isopropyl alcohol and a soft brush to clean every part of your phone. Follow this guide to see how to properly clean it. it was written for an iPhone but it is still pertinent to your phone as well. You must remove all EMI shields for a proper cleaning. While you clean, pay good attention to see if there are any broken, burned or missing components. Of course the best way would be to use an ultrasonic cleansing if you have access to it. Clean the connectors on the board as well as on the cables. Once you have it properly cleaned, replace the battery then re-evaluate.

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It's not magic. It may seem weird because it's rice but the reason is that rice happens to be a desiccant and it's easily found and for cheap in large amounts.

It's not the rice itself that works, it's the shared air between the rice and the electronic you want to dry off. When you place a device into a sealed container with enough rice it'll dry the air a lot more than the humid air in the room and so will naturally remove moisture from the phone. It may sound weird but if you speak to anyone who repairs electronics it's safe, effective and also very easy.

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How long ago ? Try putting it in rice if it was soon !

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Try drying out the water usually by putting it a bowl or bag of dry rice, hopefully that will work and no damage will have been done to your phone. Otherwise things get a bit more complicated, whether you repair it yourself or go to a shop the cost of repair will depend on what has been damaged; pray it isn't the logic board. My advice is if you can turn it on try to assess the damage and make the respective repairs if any, if you can't turn it on, bring it to a certified repairman.

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Really? Rice? Rice maybe good for Arroz Con Pollo but it has absolutely no use in repair of water logged devices.

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I'm not pretending this will work for everyone, but here's what worked for me.

Phone was dropped into a clean toilet and immediately recovered, so it was in the water for no more than a second or two. Screen was still on, so wiped with a towel and my next thought was to switch the phone off while I decided what to do. Unfortunately at this point it started flashing and misbehaving. After a few seconds, it would settle down again and the screen would go blank, but same problem every time I attempted to switch it off.

With my old phones I would have simply removed the battery, but not an option with the S6.

I did read some of the ideas here, but was quite wary of dismantling it myself.

In the end, I removed the SIM card and blew hard into the slot where it goes. A few droplets of water appeared around the camera, so wiped these away. Repeated this a few times until no more water droplets appeared. Then I got out the hair dryer, switched it to hot and basically heated the phone all around, paying particular attention to the slot where the SIM card goes. My hope was to simply evaporate any dampness still in the phone. I did this for a few minutes and after a couple of attempts, the screen was showing it's usual display. At this point I was able to power the phone down using the switch. For good measure I left it powered off overnight.

Next time, I switched it on, all was working ok again. I have a suspicion it would have worked straight away, but didn't want to take that chance.

I know I got lucky and this may not work for everyone, but it did work for me and may work for you too if you are able to act quickly.

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I don't think old Turkey understands how the rice tricks works. It's a natural desiccant and it does work very well. It takes time though but it's a life saver for electronics that are too difficult to open and dry off manually. Rice works just like any desiccant would.

The way to do it is to buy a 5 lb bag of rice and then just bury your phone inside of it. Then leave the bag open somewhere near sunlight.

I've seen a lot of people that for some reason decide to place a little bit of rice in a Tupper ware container and then seal the phone inside. That's completely pointless. The rice doesn't magically pull moisture from the phone. You need ventilation. It only works if air is able to pass through the rice and then into the phone.

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Linked Devices you are absolutely right. I do not know how it works. I admittedly am not the brightest person and it takes some time for me to understand. So why don't you tell me how it does that? Any scientific prove on this theory of yours or is it from experience only? This forum has long adapted the philosophy that the "rice trick" is nothing but a myth. Rice does not do anything but give you a false sense of security. It is the equivalent of not doing anything. If you think rice is such a great tool why not use cat litter, instant couscous, instant rice, and instant oatmeal since all of them absorb water far better than uncooked rice? How about the results obtained through a study that was conducted by DTJ Consulting or some testing as performed by Gazelle, a company that buys electronic devices? You can download their test results from here. Lets see what they found..."Despite its popularity, uncooked white rice proved to be an inferior drying agent compared to other common household materials." The only good thing about placing it in rice is that you cannot turn it on and thus prevents the water damaged phone from shortening out. Next time you have a water damaged phone, just don't do anything. Just leave it to sit outside to air dry. You will find that it has the same effect as your rice trick. Rest assured that either one of those devices will die a slow death brought on by corrosion. So enough of the rice trick already. Disassemble your device and clean it properly.

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That is true oldturkey03, Rice doesn't absorb fast enough before corrosion or failure occurs, you might as well roll it up in a bounty paper towel ball and forget about it... the best way is to disassemble it, swab it, and dry it with a hair dryer it works far better. Using rice is the same as a Placebo Effect.

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@sluggy you are correct.

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Hi, Totally agree with OT03.

I believe that the very first thing to do, regardless of the difficulty is to remove the power source. Whilst there is water present you will have current flow through components (and voltage drops across) in the device that were not meant to either withstand the amount of current or voltage applied due to the 'new' circuit paths created by the water, (it is a good conductor of electricity). The electrical damage will continue until the power is removed or the components have been destroyed. The corrosion will continue until the moisture has been removed. Rice does nothing to stop the electrical problems and is ineffective in preventing the corrosive problems.

Unfortunately, with a lot of modern electronic devices the power supply is not isolated from the circuit when you switch it off. It is still there. The correct term maybe should be place in standby with minimum power being used.

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Here's a great, short article explaining why rice is really, truly not a great idea—written by someone who knows. The folks who advocate for the rice treatment are well-meaning, and it's tempting to just stick it in rice and hope you won't have to open it up, but in the end this is bad practice. Even if the spill was pure distilled water, I'd still open it up and do the repair properly.

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Abid Rahman will be eternally grateful.
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