How do I remove a 3.5mm tip from inside the audio jack?

The tip of a 3.5mm headphone male pin has detached itself quite good inside my headphone jack (MBP 15"). I have tried every technique including toothpicks with epoxy to tweezers to tiny drills. All of this has only resulted in the tip getting more and more stuck! I am ready to open this baby up and fix it from the inside.

Would this be a good idea? Will I be able to drill open the audio output "cage" that I have observed by looking at the step-by-step guides? If this is the case - would I be able to pry out the tip from there?

But before I do it - Does anybody know if I would be able to use a bluetooth headset to get audio from my MBP? Right now I can't get any sound, even from the internal speakers since the tip is making the mac think that there are headphones attached, and therefore the speakers are offline.

I am immensely grateful for any input or words of advice. Sending it to service is out of the question for monetary reasons.

Thank You!

Answered! View the answer I have this problem too

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I used a nice dab of CRAZY glue and in seconds it was strong enough to pull the tip out with the broken part and a dab of the glue!

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KRAZY glue Max Bond Gel tube.

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I've moved on to a better way! Checkout this nifty tool: GripStick We have found this tool makes quick work on removing a broken plug end and you don't risk damaging the system.

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You need to approach this from the back of the port. You'll never get it out the front. Open your machine and look at the back of the port. Sometimes you can pull the middle bracket on the back of the port out enough to allow access to the broken tip and remove it. If this fails you will need to replace the whole left I/O board. Here's the part #922-8040: Link

Here's how to do it: MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Models A1226 and A1260 Left I/O Board Replacement

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PS if someone tells you to use tweezers to extract it out the front, you can be sure they've never done it.

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Thanks for the help! My initial plan involved a software solution - but OSX Snow Leopard does not have a system option to simply disable input from the audio jack in the first place it would seem.

I'm not concerned with the well being of the Audio Out. As long as I'll recieve sound from my speakers it would be satisfactory. Anyways - Thanks again!

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If you have access to a right-angle dental pick you may be able to perform the tip extraction by pushing through the DC input jack from the rear without removing the DC / Sound board from the PowerBook but it will be tricky to say the least!

Good links mayer!

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I had similar problem with laptop Audio Output. I used back side of ballpen refill to remove the tip. I put some glue on the refill and kept it inside the audio output for a while. The tip came out along with the refill.

Amol

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+Now this makes more sense. Good idea.

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I've got the same problem with my Macbook Air audio jack.

like Amol said, I'm using a powerglue and apply it just a bit to the inside of the rest of the broken jack (the cable, not the port ), so it won't overflow to the outer shell, push it back to the audio port, wait for a moment, then pull it out.

not sure if it's lucky or not, but, it works !!!

Thanks to Amol for the idea... thumbs up for you... you make my day better:-)

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You could try to drill a tiny hole in the jack from the outside, then screw a wood screw into it, making a handle with which to pull it out.

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Tell me you've done this.

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Sounds interesting :) I'm more inclined to open it up and try to fix it from the inside though.

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I've not done this with a stuck audio jack, but it's a common method used to grab disposable objects when you can't reach or don't want to touch the sides of the object, such as removing a pattern from a sandcasting mold, which was my inspiration for this answer. It's a better way to avoid voiding your warranty, but if that is not an issue you can of course open it up and try that instead. Be creative anyway though. If you decide to open it up, beware that the female jack might be inside a single enclosure meaning you'd not have any more access to the inside - you'd probably have to replace the plug. Here's a link to a typical jack, with picture. Good luck!

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I know this is old, but I just had to comment. 3.5 mm diameter of the jack, and you want to drill a "tiny hole and use a wood screw? your drill is going to run of the broken part of the jack and do far greater damage. Also, you better have a good drill press and a jig to hold your computer in place. Do not even try to use a handheld drill. Mission impossible, I can hear the music...Sorry. had to get it of my chest.

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Be careful, drill slowly. You're not going to need a deep hole for the screw threads to catch in the soft metal.

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drill a tiny hole into a jack then put in hole some power glue with needle when glue are strong pull it out what worked fore me :) :)

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Mine also broke and after reading different reviews I have just tried using the Q-tip (cotton bud) method. By cutting off the end of qtip, squeezing a couple drops of super glue down the end of it, not too much and not enough for it to overflow. Then pushed it onto end of broken jack (good idea to practice first with no superglue). Push qtip securely onto jack end, I left for no more than 5 mins, then pulled it out! I was so happy the jack end was attached, i literally screamed with joy! It may be worth trying without glue, cut end of qtip, push onto broken end as far as it will go, then pull out - good luck

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I used a nice dab of KRAZY glue and in seconds it was strong enough to pull the tip out with the broken part and a dab of the glue!

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Wouldn't the glue also stick to the wall of the headphone jack?

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Krazy Glue either takes too long to set up, or I didn't use enough as I've been attempting that method and it isn't working. It's a little different though as, what is stuck in my jack is one of those little beads from the bag of desiccant. Apparently one of those bags opened up in my laptop bag and left some of those little beads in the bottom. It's a new Targus bag and a new Dell laptop.

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I have the same problem, but I glued in a bit of a pen and on the pen part came out

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I've moved on to a better way! Checkout this nifty tool: GripStick. We have found this tool makes quick work on removing a broken plug end and you don't risk damaging the system.

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*FIXED* (sort of).

I had the same problem for 2 years and it drove me mad. (I had purchased AppleCare but they said it classed as "accidental damage" and wasn't covered. They quoted me GBP £850 to get the jack out, ffs! i.e., they would just replace the whole logic board, as they said the audio port couldn't be replaced on its own. So angry with Apple after this, what a waste of money. What bad service.)

In the end, after 2 years of fannying around using a USB-port audio stick every time I wanted to have sound — and after trying (and failing) to use the Q-tip + superglue trick, which just got glue stuck in the port — I got so annoyed by the inconvenience that I took the logic board out and was able to drill out the broken jack from the other side.

I did take pictures of the operation – I will try to find them and post them – but basically, from the inside the audio jack port is a grey plastic box surrounded by copper plates.

1) First, I separated the copper plates from each other. (They are each connected by a thin strip of copper, so I clipped through that strip with some small wire strippers.)

2) I then bent back the rear copper plate

3) I then drilled through the grey box from that rear side .... and out popped the broken audio jack.

4) I then carefully bent the rear copper plate back into position and did my best to make sure it was touching the 2 copper plates at the side again.

Positives: I now have sound coming out of my speakers again! Woo!

Negatives: I *can* get audio on my headphones by plugging them in, but it's distorted. I guess when I drilled through, the drill bit probably scarred some of the metal contact points inside the port. But I don't care much, because I now have audio coming out of my speakers again. :)

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Johannes Pohl will be eternally grateful.
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