The PlayStation 3 (or commonly known as the PS3) is the third home computer entertainment system produced by Sony Computer Entertainment, and the successor to the PlayStation 2. It was released November 11, 2006

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Y.L.O.D. Has Claimed a New Victim

I Had bought a repair kit from IFIXIT which had a few complications getting to me, but got to me which wasn't an issue. As I followed a different step by step repair guide due to the guide not being the guide used for my specific model of the PS3; I was able to reach the motherboard in which where the problem truly happens. I had first removed the old thermal paste from both chips and the two heat sinks, cleaned them till they shined and made sure that there was no excess thermal paste. Once then I grabbed the no clean flux which is recommended for a more successful repair, letting it seep under the chips and pass through the other side to ensure that it went all the way through. I did this with both chips. Once then I grabbed the "handy dandy" heat gun and put it on the low setting to begin warming the board for about 1 minute or 2; re-locating to the two main chips and started heating them at a closer ranger for about 1-2 minutes on each individual chip in a clock wise motion. Once finished, i let the board sit for about 30 minutes to cool and began to apply my AS5 once the board was cool enough to be touched to both chips. I then backtracked, putting the PS3 back together(excited as I was), I pressed the power button on the PS3 when all of a sudden *beep beep beep*........I don't know what I specifically did wrong or it might of been the PS3 itself, but I feel as if I wasted $50 on this kit just for it not to be in working condition.

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xhdzskullcandy, here is my answer to a similar question. First you do need to remember that this will only work if your YLOD is caused by solder fractures and if they are not to extreme. Reflowing any board with a heatgun is not an exact science and as such does have a certain amount of failure. The proper fix for this would most likely be a professional reball. Anyhow, the biggest reason for failure to reflow is not enough consistent heat. There is a fine line between reflowing and absolutely melting the solder, so one needs to be aggressive without going over board. If nothing else, get a couple of temperature probes and see what heat you generate. You also need to make sure that you apply the thermal paste properly etc. Follow the guide from here and keep on trying. If at first you don't succeed....:). Hope this helps, good luck.

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