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iPod Classic (Thin) Replacement Battery

$14.95

Product code: IF130-019

Product Overview

Like a five-year-old before a soccer game, batteries are jam-packed with juice and tend to rust when left in the rain. Cut the corrosion and charge up with our iPod Classic (Thin) replacement battery today.

Compatible with 80, 120, or 160 GB (thin) iPod Classics.

Compatibility

Identify your iPod

  • 80, 120, or 160 GB (Thin) iPod Classics

Product Details

  • Capacity: 580 mAh

$14.95 Fix Kit

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

6 month warranty

Notes:

Fix Kit Contents:

  • New 580 mAh Replacement Battery
  • Plastic Opening Tools
  • Metal Spudger
  • Spudger

Additional Required Tools:

$13.95 Part Only

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

6 month warranty

Notes:

This option includes the replacement battery only, no tools.

Add to Cart »
 

Compatibility

iPod Classic
120 GB
160 GB (Thin)
80 GB
 

Stories

My Problem

Once upon a time there was a liiiiiiittle ipod classic. It's mommy liked to take it everywhere she went. In high school, ipod classic went to swim meets and band competitions, rejecting social interaction left and right. When mommy went to college in Colorado ipod classic went too, connecting mommy to a socially acceptable form of identity through her "sweet tunes". Ipod classic even smoked pot and became waaaaayyyyyy cheeeeeeeeeeell. So cheeeeeeeell, in fact, that on one hazy April day, ipod classic's battery cheeeeelled out for good. Yup, ipod classic died.

My Fix

This probably took me an hour or two. I have never worked on electronics but my nimble little hands seemed to fare better than those of the whiny chumps who broke it at step 2 after "blahblah years of experience". Most of the work was done with the putty knife (ESSENTIAL), which feels much more hardcore to use than those silly little plastic backscratchers anyways.

The hardest part was separating the front and back panel, as it wasn't clear in the guide how far down the sides of the ipod I needed to go to free the clips. You need to re-insert the putty knife farther down the sides of the ipod (almost to the corners) to get the bottom clips.

Needless to say, I did feel exceptionally cool once completed.

My Advice

The pictures make it look like you need to do a back bend with your putty knife. Don't do that. Simply wiggle it, and you'll feel the clips kind of "snap" downwards (which is what you want).

Getting the putty knife in the sides is going to be the hardest part.

You can do it!

My Problem

iPod Classic quit working

My Fix

I've had it open a couple times previously so that went OK. The toughest part was the speaker jack which is so tiny it's hard to tell that it has a flip-up retainer. Needed mag glass to see. Appreciated magnified view of it in Guide.

My Advice

It's not an easy fix due to tiny jacks and ribbon wires. Locking tweezers are a big help for ribbon wires.

My Problem

Capacity of the battery was declining

My Fix

Smoothly, I encountered no problems apart from minor scratches on the hull.

My Advice

No additional advice, the manual was perfect.

My Problem

The old battery just would not allow me to watch more than about an hour of video - a terrible traveling companion.

My Fix

The repair guide and comments were helpful. Getting the putty knife started was the hard part. Overall the repair worked, but I managed to break the hold button ribbon. Not sure how to not break it since Apple glued it under the battery. So, new battery but a non-functional hold button. Small price to pay for movies on the airplane.

My Advice

When working the case near the earphone jack the guide says to pry the case and insert the opening tool on the side. This is difficult to impossible since the open side of the case is pushing on the closed side. I found it easier to slide the plastic opening tool around the corner to get at the closed side.

james's Story Photo #335282

My Problem

iPod classic was giving me a red circle with a red X.

I might have gotten it a tad moist but I wiped off the seawater that got splashed onto it very quickly - not quickly enough it would seem.

My Fix

Upon opening the iPod I discovered the battery cable was corroded. I'm thinking the system is not getting the power to the right places to boot the HD etc. - iFixit had the part - I ordered it.

Part arrived and I set about replacing it. I then realized the corrosion had also weakened the cable "holder" on the motherboard but with a little careful re-soldering that was also fixed.

Problem was - the red X is still there.

Next thing I checked was the HD (I should have checked here first...) After removing a sticker, rubber bumpers and some foam I open the HD casing and see that there is extensive corrosoion to the HD's board. Conclusion - that's my problem and it's toast.

A replacement HD is beyond my means so I have a bunch of known working components up for grabs, including the brand new unused (but opened) battery from iFixit.

Hey iFixit it do you want them? (or anyone else for that matter?)

- working LCD unit

- working click wheel unit

- front & back casing

- motherboard to HD cable

- audio jack cable assembly

Basically everything except for the HD and motherboard (because I re-soldered it)

My Advice

Don't jump to conclusions when you open your device. Yes, it might be the problem but there may be others lurking that also need your attention and may put the scope of repair beyond your means or abilities.

My Problem

My ipod classic (6th generation 80GB) was only getting a couple hours playback on a full battery charge. I was charging constantly everyday. I listened to one album and half the battery was gone.

My Fix

Once I got the new battery, I started dissembling it. It took a while, un doing the pins was frustrating, but I finally got it open. The new battery came the glue on it, so swapping it was very easy.

My Advice

Take your time opening it. The device will get scratched, but pay extra attention when putting it back together. Make all the pins are back in the original positions. Go on youtube and look up how to videos before starting.

My Problem

Battery stopped charging.

My Fix

It was like cracking open a safe. After I finally managed to pry it apart, my downfall was the battery connector. When I snapped out the old battery tape from the circuit board, the entire connector came off as well. The solder connectors between the connector and the board are extremely fragile apparently, so of course one snapped off inside the connector. After that, there was no hope for repair.

My Advice

Be very very careful when taking off the battery tape from the connector. On another (successful) battery replacement, I made a little hook out of a paper clip that enabled me to be much more precise when lifting up on the release clip.

My Problem

The part of my headphone jack that transmits to the right earphone went bad and it was really annoying. So I ordered a new jack and went ahead with a new battery as well.

My Fix

The repair went great only took about 15 minutes total, about 5 to get it open. I didn't use putty knife though I just used the tools that came with the battey and used the metal spudger to unset the clips with very minimal damage to the casing there is just a minute gap on the right side but I can live with that.

My Advice

Opening the device is the hardest part so just be very gentle with it but thanks to the repair guide i can enjoy my iPod again.

My Problem

About a year ago my brand new iPod classic got a tiny amount of water inside of it, and the battery was almost completely fried. It would flash the apple sign repeatedly after a month of no use, but still did nothing.

My Fix

It says that it was rated a 6/10 difficulty, but it was my first time and completed it within ten minutes! It was a little rough getting the tools between the front and back of the iPod but with a little thought and wedging it was completed!

My Advice

Never get discouraged when your iPod has anything wrong with it, troubleshoot it and don't hold back! It's a lot easier than you think!

campinsm's Story Photo #297361
campinsm's Story Photo #297362

My Problem

Two old iPods (30 & 80 gig) batteries were dead. Otherwise they were in pristine condition. Apple repairs were too costly and time consuming for my taste.

My Fix

I followed the iFixit instructions and watched videos. As others will testify, opening these little beauties is THE HARDEST part of the job. My 30 gig finally opened without any damage and the battery replacement was a snap. However my poor 80 gig suffered significant cosmetic damage as well as the LCD display was damaged just from trying to open the darn thing. Yet it now works great as long as I have it plugged into a vehicle and don't need the iPod display screen.

My Advice

If you are prissy about your iPods and don't want to risk damage spend the money and time and take to Apple. In my case these iPods were useless without new batteries so it was worth the risk. Opening them is the only hard part. Be especially careful around the screen it is the easiest area to start the process but it is also where the most damage can occur. For $40 they were both fixed in three days time (from battery order to repaired).