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PC2-5300 4 GB RAM Chip

$109.95

Product code: IF111-031-1

Product Overview

RAM is an acronym for Rampant Appalachian MollusksRubbery Astronaut MildewReally Awesome MacaroniRobust Auxiliary Muggles… The important thing to know is that adding RAM to your computer can provide a significant performance boost.

Works only in Macbooks and MacBook Pros with Santa Rosa or Penryn chip sets. This chip will not work in computers with Core Duo or Core 2 Duo (non-Santa Rosa or Penryn) processors. If you're not sure which model computer you have, identify your Mac. The Santa Rosa and Penryn Core 2 Duo MacBooks and MacBook Pros can address up to 6 GB of RAM using this chip along with a 2 GB RAM chip.

You may receive a PC2-6400 RAM chip instead. These chips are fully backwards compatible and will function identically to the PC2-5300 chips.

Compatibility

  • 1.83, 2, 2.1, 2.13, 2.16, 2.2, or 2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo MacBooks (Excludes MacBook Unibody)
  • 2.16, 2.2, 2.33, 2.4, 2.5 or 2.6 GHz (Models A1211/A1226/A1260) 15" MacBook Pros
  • 2.33, 2.4, 2.5, or 2.6 GHz (Models A1212/A1229/A1261) 17" MacBook Pros
  • 2 or 2.16 GHz 17" Intel iMacs
  • 2.16, 2.33, 2 (EMC 2133) or 2.4 (EMC 2133) GHz 20" Intel iMacs
  • 2.16, 2.33, 2.4 or 2.8 (EMC 2134) GHz 24" Intel iMacs
  • 1.83 or 2 GHz Core 2 Duo (Model A1176) Mac minis (3 GB maximum)

Product Details

  • Height: 1" (Low Profile)
  • Type: 200 pin, DDR-2, 667 MHz

  $109.95 New

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

6 month warranty

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8 Available

Quantity:

 

Compatibility

iMac Intel 17"
2 GHz
2.16 GHz
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2105 and 2118
2.16 GHz
2.33 GHz
iMac Intel 20" EMC 2133 and 2210
2 GHz (EMC No. 2133)
2.4 GHz (EMC No. 2133)
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2111
2.16 GHz
2.33 GHz
iMac Intel 24" EMC 2134 and 2211
2.4 GHz
2.8 GHz (EMC No. 2134)
Mac mini Model A1176
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo, Mid 2007)
2 GHz (Core 2 Duo, A1176)
MacBook Core 2 Duo
1.83 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2 GHz (C2D, Late 2006)
2 GHz (C2D, Mid 2007)
2 GHz (Early 2009)
2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.1 GHz (Penryn)
2.13 GHz (Mid 2009)
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Model A1211
2.16 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
MacBook Pro 15" Core 2 Duo Models A1226 and A1260
2.2 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.4 GHz (Penryn)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
MacBook Pro 17" Models A1151 A1212 A1229 and A1261
2.33 GHz (Core 2 Duo)
2.4 GHz (Santa Rosa)
2.5 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Penryn)
2.6 GHz (Santa Rosa)
 

Stories

My Problem

The original 1 GB was just not cutting it on this old puppy... Also, OS 10.6.8 is as far as it would upgrade, leaving me out of the Cloud.

My Fix

Everything went super smooth and easy!

I wish I had thought of doing it myself earlier!

Though the upgrade to I OS 10.7 is still on hold due to something strange going on from the app store's end, my laptop is stable and super fast again.

Who would have thought a 7 year old laptop is still so alive and well =)

My Advice

Just do it!

And don't sweat the screwdriver. If you wear glasses and/or have have one of those glass repair kits around, the tiny screwdriver in there will work for the screws!

My Problem

Upgrade vs. new

My Fix

Piece of cake...very straight forward. Formatting hard drive and setting up OS X was the only process that took some time

My Advice

Keep it up! Thanks

My Problem

I had ruined the keyboard by trying to clean it with a dampened cloth and Windex. I found out later to use only distilled water, and a minimum of that on a cloth, wrung-out as much as possible.

Since I had to go in to replace the keyboard [from Amazon], I also decided to max out the RAM to 6GB, using iFixit.com 4GB and 2GB chips [2 bays] and install a 128GB Samsung SSD [also from Amazon] in place of the 160GB hard drive to help improve speed.

My Fix

Following the iFixIt.com guide, everything was straightforward except the HD hookup and initialization. No instructions with iFixIt.com Universal Drive Adapter kit, but looking at connectors I was able to figure out how the kit itself went together and how to hook up ESATA SSD power and USB connections.

After hookup to the kit, I partitioned the SSD with Disk Utility, cloned my old drive with Carbon Copy Cloner via USB 2.0 to the new SSD drive and booted from the new SSD before I installed it inside the case.

Mechanical part of repair was relatively easy, except for handling those tiny #00 Phillips screws.

My Advice

1) Use a clean, uncluttered work table, with area for all removed parts - label everything as it comes out.

2) When installing a new drive, use Disk Utility to partition it first, even if you're only going to have 1 partition - otherwise the drive won't be recognized by the Mac OS X.

3) Have a pencil magnet [for those tiny steel screws] and make labeled sandwich bags for each step in the iFixIt.com sequence.

4) When replacing the upper case/keyboard, some of the screw tab holes may not line up perfectly, but you can use an awl or similar to align tabs with holes so the screws can go in.

5) If you're replacing a part with x number of screw holes, don't tighten them all completely until they are all installed and threading in. Then tighten from the center of an area outward, symmetrically, in steps, to spread the compression equally.

My Problem

Slow performance in my MacBook 13'' Early 2009. Run out of disk space.

My Fix

Smooth. Simple. Upgrading memory and Hard Drive are among the easiest task you can do in this MacBook model.

My Advice

Before taking out the Hard Drive, I repaired permissions. I used the rubber case included in the kit to be able to use the old HD as external backup, then I restored data from old HD to new Flash Drive using Mavericks and recovery utility included in the OS.

My Problem

The old hard drive was absolutely filled - No place for change of Mac OS X Version

My Fix

The repair went very well - Did not use any Disk Cloning tools Just Disk Utilities and Time Machine

My Advice

Just format your new drive with Mac OS X Disk Utilities as a Bootable Partition - Do a restore from Time Machine to Your New Drive - Test it as You Boot Your new drive from a USB or Firewire atachment - If it is going well - Swap Your Physical Drives

My Problem

Need for speed

My Fix

Straightforward

My Advice

Be careful with magnetized screws. Memory installation very simple, though it appears that speed may be slightly higher with the 4Gb chip in the lower bay. Instructions for installing hard drive enclosure excellent. Replacing 1Tb primary drive into optical bay enclosure, put an SSD into old primary space. DVD drive into external enclosure. System and application installation ongoing now.

My Problem

I recently purchased my very first Mac product, a Macbook Pro Duo Core in perfect condition. It came with just 2gigs of RAM, so I ordered 6gigs of RAM from iFixit.

My Fix

It was painless. I had no problem installing the RAM and the machine now runs much better.

My Advice

iFixit rocks. Plain and simple. The ordering process was smooth, the product shipped quickly and arrived perfectly packaged. Keep up the good work guy & gals! Looks like I'll be needing a battery soon and guess who I will buy it from!

My Problem

My new iMac 27" and 2008-early 13" MacBook weren't slow, but I knew they could be faster w/ triple the memory. My wife uses the MB a lot to work remotely, and I was shocked how much faster she could get more of her work done with the add'l RAM

My Fix

A-Okay--no problems whatsoever!

My Advice

More Ram!

My Problem

The only software issue was the Adobe CS5 which doesn't reinstall with code.

My Fix

I deactivated the software, put in the new HD, Time Machine did it thing for 3 hrs, and the internet automatically activated Adobe CS5.

My Advice

Have some epoxy around for those 3 fragile brackets in the battery area.

My Problem

As a developer and a photographer, I have been struggling for a while with the limitations of a four year old laptop compared to requirements of working with today's technology. I had the Apple max RAM of 4GB installed, and had already upgraded the original 250GB HD to 500GB a couple years ago. Still, I was looking at a new MacBook Pro in order to have enough resources for today's photo processing software and development tools.

Armed with a new 4GB RAM chip and a new 750GB hard drive, I spent most of a weekend breathing new life into my reliable but aging 2008 MacBook Pro.

My Fix

The RAM upgrade was dead simple. Just pop out one of the 2GB chips and insert the new 4GB chip and you are done. The iFixit guide is clear and makes a basic process even easier. This took only a few minutes. Button things up, power the system on and - bam - 50% more RAM.

The most time consuming part of the hard drive replacement is duplicating the current drive. I mounted the new drive in an external USB enclosure I already had on hand (about $40 from Amazon, if I remember correctly) in order to copy the entire contents of my current drive to the new one. Carbon Copy Cloner is great for this, although there are other tools as well. Be sure to format the new drive with a GUID partition type and copy all the files to make the external drive bootable.

When the drive finishes copying, test it out by rebooting and holding down the Option key to select the external drive as the boot drive. Verify everything is there.

After verifying the new drive contains all your data, iFixit hard drive replacement guide enables anyone that can use a screwdriver to open up the case and swap the hard drives.

After the drive swap and memory upgrade, it was time to upgrade to Lion (OS X 10.7), and then the inevitable chasing down of software build tool dependencies, but that's another story.

My Advice

The new system I want is always around $3k, which is not exactly pocket change these days. For a few hundred bucks I was able to extend the useful life of the last $3k I spent on my 2008 MacBook Pro. I've still got my eye on a new MacBook Pro, but for now I have "sharpened my saw" enough to efficiently continue cutting through my daily work load.

Don't be intimidated by technology or spend money on a new system if you don't really need one. Use the iFixit guides to get the most out of your current hardware.