Video Overview

Introduction

We're completing this week's teardown trifecta with the Gear Fit, Samsung's latest offering that attempts to either sportify a smartwatch, or smartify a sportwatch. Will it leave us as breathless as its brother, the Gear 2, or will it just give us fits? The teardown team is in high gear, so join us and find out!

If high-tech hardware sets your heart racing, you're fit to befriend us on Facebook, trade tweets with us in the Twitterverse, and swoon over some sweet photos on our Instagram.

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your Samsung Gear Fit, use our service manual.

Image 1/2: 1.84” Curved Super AMOLED touchscreen display (432 x 128 pixels) Image 2/2: 180 MHz ARM Cortex M4 CPU
  • What did Samsung fit inside the Gear Fit?

    • 1.84” Curved Super AMOLED touchscreen display (432 x 128 pixels)

    • 180 MHz ARM Cortex M4 CPU

    • Accelerometer, gyroscope, and heart rate sensor

    • Battery good for 3-4 days of normal use

    • Bluetooth 4.0 LE

  • It's a tidy little package, but you know how this works: it's all gotta come out.

Add Comment

Add Comment

Image 1/2: Riding along against your arm, you'll find the heart rate monitor and charging cradle contacts. Image 2/2: Let's hope that Samsung didn't include a remote taser feature.
  • Wrist strap dispatched, it's time for a close-up inspection of the dark side wrist-side of the Fit.

  • Riding along against your arm, you'll find the heart rate monitor and charging cradle contacts.

    • Let's hope that Samsung didn't include a remote taser feature.

    • They did include a model number: SM-R350, if our eyes do not deceive us.

  • A single button serves as a sleep/wake and power switch, and is the only significant opening in the unibody enclosure.

Add Comment

Image 1/2: ...Only to find a hole. Perhaps for a microphone? Image 2/2: Whatever it is, it's no help in the opening procedure mystery. Looks like we're gonna need a little help.
  • On the hunt for screws, we take a peek under a promising cover...

  • ...Only to find a hole. Perhaps for a microphone?

  • Whatever it is, it's no help in the opening procedure mystery. Looks like we're gonna need a little help.

the hole should only function for IPXX test , maybe a vaccum machine test hole

ROH - Reply

  • And help we shall receive—after we tell you about our exciting product, the iOpener. The iOpener makes repairs safer for you and your devices by gently heating and softening stubborn adhesives, without the danger of melting plastic or warping LCDs that you risk when using a heat gun.

  • Let's go ahead and throw an iOpener on our device, and—oh, what's that? We already did?

    • Why hello there, little Fit. Looking pretty cozy there. Sure would be a shame if somebody...

    • PRIED OFF YOUR FACE.

  • Thanks, iOpener.

Add Comment

Image 1/3: This thing is [http://youtu.be/_bMcXVe8zIs|layered like an onion|new_window=true]. Let's hope this is a safe place for some prying... Image 2/3: It is! With a wee pop, the cute sushi-shaped innards are free. We personally think it looks like some tasty [http://d3nevzfk7ii3be.cloudfront.net/igi/TalOHcVlFucZkIYq|nigiri|new_window=true] (we ''are'' a California company after all). Image 3/3: It is! With a wee pop, the cute sushi-shaped innards are free. We personally think it looks like some tasty [http://d3nevzfk7ii3be.cloudfront.net/igi/TalOHcVlFucZkIYq|nigiri|new_window=true] (we ''are'' a California company after all).
  • Adhesive softened, a little gentle prying and slicing is all it takes to separate the curved display from the body, hinging on its data and digitizer cables.

  • This thing is layered like an onion. Let's hope this is a safe place for some prying...

  • It is! With a wee pop, the cute sushi-shaped innards are free. We personally think it looks like some tasty nigiri (we are a California company after all).

Add Comment

Image 1/3: Our hats are off to Samsung, creators of the world's first apparently air-powered smartwatch. Image 2/3: Hang on, there seem to be a few bits stuck to the back of the AMOLED unit. Hats back on for the moment. Image 3/3: We get back to work, plastic opening tool in hand, to free the LCD from its burdens.
  • The display is out, and all that's left is an empty case. Teardown complete!

    • Our hats are off to Samsung, creators of the world's first apparently air-powered smartwatch.

  • Hang on, there seem to be a few bits stuck to the back of the AMOLED unit. Hats back on for the moment.

  • We get back to work, plastic opening tool in hand, to free the LCD from its burdens.

Add Comment

Image 1/3: We liked the Gear 2's [guide|23990|combined digitizer and LCD data cable|stepid=61472], but it really isn't ''that'' much more effort to disconnect two things to remove the display. Image 2/3: At least these guys never got in the way of our industrious opening tools, [guide|24016|unlike others we could name|stepid=61518]. Image 3/3: At 432 x 128 pixels, the Fit sports just over half the pixel count of the Gear 2's 320 x 320 display.
  • With some careful coaxing, we pick our sushi apart and peel the display assembly off the frame.

  • We liked the Gear 2's combined digitizer and LCD data cable, but it really isn't that much more effort to disconnect two things to remove the display.

  • At 432 x 128 pixels, the Fit sports just over half the pixel count of the Gear 2's 320 x 320 display.

Add Comment

Image 1/3: Our first stop: disconnect the battery. Next step: figure how to get it out. That's gonna take some digging... Image 2/3: Peeling the Bluetooth antenna up from the side allows us to pop the first segment free of the plastic frame. Image 3/3: Peeling the Bluetooth antenna up from the side allows us to pop the first segment free of the plastic frame.
  • A close look at the motherboard shows a segmented, three-piece construction, with ribbon cables joining the parts—certainly an interesting approach, in contrast to the rumored flexible PCB of the upcoming wearable iDevice.

  • Our first stop: disconnect the battery. Next step: figure how to get it out. That's gonna take some digging...

  • Peeling the Bluetooth antenna up from the side allows us to pop the first segment free of the plastic frame.

Add Comment

Image 1/2: Aww, you're a cute little itty bitty motherboard, aren't you? Yes you are! Image 2/2: It could be a [http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2f/Mirage_hotel.jpg|mirage], but is that a battery under there? We'll have to wait to see.
  • This is starting to feel a lot like KP. More peeling as the ribbon cable and contact for the Fit's sole button are spudgered away.

  • Aww, you're a cute little itty bitty motherboard, aren't you? Yes you are!

  • It could be a mirage, but is that a battery under there? We'll have to wait to see.

Add Comment

Image 1/2: STMicroelectronics  [http://www.st.com/web/catalog/mmc/FM141/SC1169/SS1577/LN1806/PF255420|STM32F439ZI|new_window=true] 180 MHz, 32 bit ARM Cortex CPU Image 2/2: Macronix [http://www.macronix.com/en-us/Product/NORFlash/Documents/MX69V.pdf|MX69V28F64|new_window=true] 128 Mb flash memory
  • Populating the board, we find this fittingly Lilliputian array of chips:

    • STMicroelectronics STM32F439ZI 180 MHz, 32 bit ARM Cortex CPU

    • Macronix MX69V28F64 128 Mb flash memory

    • InvenSense MPU-6500 6-axis gyroscope / accelerometer

    • Broadcom BCM4334WKUBG dual-band 802.11n, Bluetooth 4.0+HS, FM receiver combo chip

    • Maxim Integrated MAX77836 (the same chip we found in the Gear 2—likely the micro-USB interface controller and Li+ battery charger)

    • Melfas 8FM006A (likely touchscreen controller)

    • Texas Instruments 1211A1 standalone USB transceiver chip

Add Comment

Image 1/3: The curvy Fit features a curved battery, snugly fitted as [http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ccuNVvbMALA/UeqJ5GMPcOI/AAAAAAAAK0w/7cINEaMa62s/s1600/IMG_1534.JPG|a bug in a plastic rug.|new_window=true] Image 2/3: Although it is pretty deeply buried, the battery is still equipped with a friendly and useful pull tab. We'll call this "fairly" user-replaceable. Image 3/3: While we couldn't find any useful markings to confirm, [http://gizmodo.com/samsungs-galaxy-fit-is-a-smartwatch-and-a-fitness-trac-1529854495|Gizmodo|new_window=true] tells us this is a 210 mAh battery, with 3-4 days between charges.
  • A small metal strut separates the motherboard from the battery, and protects the unit from over-enthusiastic squeezing, to ensure your Fit is fit for active duty.

  • The curvy Fit features a curved battery, snugly fitted as a bug in a plastic rug.

    • Although it is pretty deeply buried, the battery is still equipped with a friendly and useful pull tab. We'll call this "fairly" user-replaceable.

  • While we couldn't find any useful markings to confirm, Gizmodo tells us this is a 210 mAh battery, with 3-4 days between charges.

    • That puts the Gear Fit ahead of the Gear 2 in the battery department, due mostly to a simpler OS and its low-power processor.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: While it's a bit of work, users can replace their own battery, greatly extending the useful life of the Fit.
  • Samsung Gear Fit Repairability Score: 6 out of 10 (10 is easiest to repair).

    • While it's a bit of work, users can replace their own battery, greatly extending the useful life of the Fit.

    • Watch band can be removed and replaced in seconds.

    • The display is the first component out, easing repair of the most-likely-broken component, but still requires melting adhesive and prying.

    • Low modularity—peripheral components (home switch, antenna, and vibrator motor) are soldered onto the main board and not individually replaceable without soldering.

    • The unibody design means any repairs require trucking through the display removal procedure first, risking damage to the LCD.

Add Comment

4 Comments

According to the datasheet, it has 128 Mb of flash memory.

yod527 - Reply

My poor little gFit is clinging to my write for dear life after seeing this! :)

Truly amazing!

Tony - Reply

Anyone know the pin out for the charging it 5v and gnd thanks

neil wallace - Reply

what exactly is that black pad on the back of the display? my watch had an apoxy mishap and that dissolved completely. I'm trying to figure out if I can replace that (or use some material to create the same spacing) or if I've lost touch screen ability completely

Jon Borah - Reply

Add Comment

View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 12

Past 7 Days: 105

Past 30 Days: 518

All Time: 47,429