Tools Featured in this Teardown

Introduction

NeXT Computer was founded inwhen he was forced out of Apple by John Scully. He started NeXT as a high-end computer company targeted at the University/Scientist/Computing Industry. NeXT only ever released , the NeXTStation, and The NeXTCube, in different variations. NeXT computers were high-end workstation computers, and only a few thousand were ever sold. The NeXTStation featured a, though the Turbo NeXTStation featured a68040. There were color and non-color variations of the NeXTStation. The world's first web server was created by Tim Berners-Lee, at CERN on a NeXTCube. NeXT computers were used to make games like Doom, and Wolfenstein. This is my&W NeXTStation. Mac OS X Is based off of NeXTStep, the NeXT OS.

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your NeXTstation, use our service manual.

Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • The NeXTStation, this is a great addition to any computer collection.

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Image 1/3: Then, lift the top cover of the computer. This will reveal the guts. Image 2/3: The ports from left to right: SCSI2, Keyboard & Mouse, DSP Port, DB-19(MegaPixel Display), DB-9(Serial), RJ-45(Ethernet), Coaxial (10b2 Ethernet), Power Image 3/3: I find notes in everything!
  • Turn the NeXTStation around, and remove this screw:

  • Then, lift the top cover of the computer. This will reveal the guts.

  • The ports from left to right: SCSI2, Keyboard & Mouse, DSP Port, DB-19(MegaPixel Display), DB-9(Serial), RJ-45(Ethernet), Coaxial (10b2 Ethernet), Power

  • I find notes in everything!

" Keyboard & Mouse"

Nope! Those are serial ports. The keyboard plugs into the monitor, and the mouse plugs into the keyboard.

Also the DB-9 is the printer port, by which the NeXT laser printer was attached. I don't think it could be used for general serial communications. On the other hand, if I recall correctly the DSP port *was* usable for high-speed serial communications.

jonhendry - Reply

Image 1/2: The NeXTStation uses a 50-Pin SCSI Hard Drive up to 4GB. Image 2/2: Remove all of the cables from the logic board.
  • Removing the hard drive:

  • The NeXTStation uses a 50-Pin SCSI Hard Drive up to 4GB.

  • Remove all of the cables from the logic board.

It's incredible how modern this board looks, despite its being so dated.

tabormeister - Reply

Quote from tabormeister:

It's incredible how modern this board looks, despite its being so dated.

Yep, this was one fast of a workstation back in 90"

Chris Green - Reply

Image 1/3: Once the screw is removed, pivot the drive up on a 45 Degree angle, then slide it out. Image 2/3: Once the screw is removed, pivot the drive up on a 45 Degree angle, then slide it out. Image 3/3: Once the screw is removed, pivot the drive up on a 45 Degree angle, then slide it out.
  • Then remove this screw.

  • Once the screw is removed, pivot the drive up on a 45 Degree angle, then slide it out.

Wow, it is so easy to take everything out!!! Now there are milions of screws and connectors, turning devices around and so on... I'm amazed of the simplicity!

jakub004 - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • The Hard Drive & Caddy

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Image 1/3: The NeXTStation uses a non-standard 2.88MB 3.5" floppy drive, though it uses the standard floppy connector. Image 2/3: Remove the floppy cable. Image 3/3: Then, remove this screw.
  • Removing the floppy disk drive:

  • The NeXTStation uses a non-standard 2.88MB 3.5" floppy drive, though it uses the standard floppy connector.

  • Remove the floppy cable.

  • Then, remove this screw.

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Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • Then, just like the hard drive, pivot the drive up 45 degrees, and pull it out.

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Image 1/3: Remove this connector. Image 2/3: Remove these screws. Image 3/3: Remove the fan.
  • Removing the fan:

  • Remove this connector.

  • Remove these screws.

  • Remove the fan.

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Image 1/3: Remove the power supply connector.  Just lift it straight up, and it should come free. Image 2/3: remove this screw. Image 3/3: remove this screw.
  • Removing the logic board:

  • Remove the power supply connector. Just lift it straight up, and it should come free.

  • remove this screw.

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Image 1/3: Now, set the board aside. Image 2/3: Now, set the board aside. Image 3/3: Now, set the board aside.
  • Lift the end of the logic board(away from the ports), and slide it away from the ports.

  • Now, set the board aside.

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Image 1/3: Remove this screw. Image 2/3: Lift the power supply up, and out. Image 3/3: Lift the power supply up, and out.
  • Power Supply:

  • Remove this screw.

  • Lift the power supply up, and out.

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Image 1/1: The Board has a 25Mhz Motorola 68040 CPU, This board features a ton of chips for somthing made nearly 20 years ago.
  • The Logic Board Overview:

  • The Board has a 25Mhz Motorola 68040 CPU, This board features a ton of chips for somthing made nearly 20 years ago.

  • The CPU: Motorola XC68040RC25

  • The Co-Procesor: MB610313

  • Motorola Chips

  • Intel Chips

  • AMD Chips (Intel and AMD In the same computer?)

  • Fujitsu Chips

I think the MB610313 is a DMA controller ASIC.

jonhendry - Reply

Image 1/3: The Serial # Image 2/3: Looks like my NeXTStation came from WilTel. Image 3/3: It is model # N1100
  • Made in the USA, you don't see this anymore.

  • The Serial #

  • Looks like my NeXTStation came from WilTel.

  • It is model # N1100

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Chris Green

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http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhfUKEu7s...

The Machine to Build the Machines:

Watch NeXT's revolutionary computer controlled (NeXT Cubes - no less) assembly line in action!

Juddy - Reply

Quote from Juddy:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhfUKEu7s... The Machine to Build the Machines: Watch NeXT's revolutionary computer controlled (NeXT Cubes - no less) assembly line in action!

Amazing!

Chris Green - Reply

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