Plastic Opening Tools

$2.95

Product code: IF145-000

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Plastic Opening Tools

$2.95

Product code: IF145-000

Product Overview

The essential tool for opening everything.

  • Use these soft plastic tools to safely pry open devices without scratching the case, glass, or internal components.
  • Sold in a pair of two different styles—a wide tool with a thin tip that's great for getting underneath glass and in thin cracks, and a smaller, stiffer tip that's good for prying tougher cases and enclosures.
  • NOTE: Because these tools are soft enough to not scratch or mar devices they will wear with each use. Expect each pair to last through 2-5 devices, depending on difficulty and experience.

Product Details

$2.95 Pair

 

Condition:

New

$9.95 10 Pack

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Includes 10 total Plastic Opening Tools. 5 of each style.

$14.95 15 Pairs

 

Condition:

New

Notes:

Includes 30 total Plastic Opening Tools. 15 of each style.

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Product Details

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Plastic opening tools are made of a soft plastic, allowing them to dislodge casing clips without fear of scratching or chewing the case.

Block Image

Their size and material also make our plastic opening tools ideal for working inside the device—use them to pop up ZIF connector tabs, disconnect cable connectors, pry up batteries, and scrape off excess adhesive.

 

Stories

My Problem

The battery in my 4 year old MacBook Pro was acting up - erratically switching off although still 40% full, diminishing uptime, and telling me it needed "servicing". Since there is no Apple store in this part of the world, I went to a certified Apple repair shop where they told me "You can leave your laptop here, but it will be 10 days before anyone will look at it. And no,before having looked at it we can't give you an estimate for the price and time it will take."

In the meantime one of the fans became noisy, perhaps after I dropped the 'Book on the floor (carpet-covered, so there was nothing broken, only the noisy fan, annoying in an otherwise completely silent machine).

After some discussions with friends and colleagues and a lengthy visit to the iFixit web site, in particular on the question whether it will even be possible to replace the glued-in battery, plus a trip to the basement to verify that I had a bottle of isopropyl alcohol (IPA) available, I ordered a left fan, a battery and a collection of little tools from iFixit.

My Fix

The first positive surprise was the speed of delivery, less than 2 days from California to the west of France.: I ordered on Tuesday afternoon, and on Thursday morning the packet was at my doorstep. And on Thursday night, everything was fixed.

The easy part was the left fan. There is a detailed guide with pictures from iFixit, and this must be one of the simplest parts to replace; no other part has to be removed to get at it. Opening up a PowerBook with the right tools is much easier now than it was 12 years ago when I last did a DIY replacement on my iBook (lime green "toilet seat" model, much loved).

As for the battery, it is glued in, and the official advice, even from iFixit, is that you cannot do it yourself, unless you want to replace half of the casing of the laptop and pay around 500$. But I came across a discussion

<Has anybody tried heat to loosen battery glue?>

with a link to a video from byteguys.co.uk where they show how it can be done, involving IPA and a syringe, plus a lot of patience. One has to be careful, constantly prying with some force without breaking the plastic tools nor any computer parts,repeatedly squirting IPA underneath the battery without piercing it and starting a fire.

It took me about an hour, but it worked.

Then 5 minutes for putting the new battery in (it comes with glue strips) and closing everything up. and now my PowerBook is as good as new.

Thanks iFixit!

My Advice

My advice is: before you start, spend enough time looking at the experience of others, until you feel confident whom you can trust.

And get the right tools for the task, it makes a big difference.

My Problem

Your document is made for adding an additional SSD drive on a mid 2010 iMac i7. id 11.3

My Fix

Note:

1. There was one more screw, or 9 instead of 8 on the motherboard.

2. Sugestions: When you unscrew the screws on the motherboard, as sure to have inserted into the holes at the rear of the frame cable or USB or Firewire to maintain enlignement motherboard during reassembly.

3. enlignement motherboard is very important. Do not neglect the position of either side of the cable and also on the side of your RAM as I disassemble the computer a second time to replace the RAM side of the card.

4. I highly suggest you have good lighting and a magnifying glass if you have eyes like mine. If you are alone, try a frame with magnifying glass and light as jewelers that will secure you.

My Advice

Note: My experience was a bit complicated because I saw close is not good .with small connectors are difficult to see the male and female to withdraw. I ripped the male and female connector on the motherboard and the two pins on the motherboard broke. I have not been able to restore power as it was the last power button.

Two solutions: Buy a new Imac or cut the connector, strip the son and the son soldered directly onto the motherboard with a distance of 1mm between the terminals. My son helped me because his eyesight and manual dexterity is better than mine at his age.

welding we have succeeded on the motherboard and the computer is left like new. What experience! Later I added 32GB of RAM on a mid 2010 iMac i7 id11,3 is considered maximum 16GB. Now the computer everything is fine.

My Problem

LCD had a large 'dead' area. Usable but ugly.

My Fix

Intense but successful. Suggestions on keeping parts organized were VERY helpful. In the 'iPhone4_Display_ReplacementGuide.pdf picture for step 18 (Lift the grounding clip) confused me. I keep trying to pull the shiny part (under the thumb).

My Advice

Print out the guide BUT realize all the pictures don't print. Use that as your guide, tracking and checking off steps so you can retrace more easily. HEADLAMP and, if needed, reading or magnifying glasses. A Headlamp (like a camping type or ones you get a HomeDepot) was critical. Take your time and pray (I'm not kidding!). Took me about 4 hours (20 minutes on step 18), BUT IT IS NOT A TIMED COMPETITION!! The satisfaction from saving/re-using an existing phone is a great part of the reward.

My Problem

My Iphone 5s developed a microphone issue after a few months of use. I couldn't be heard when making a phone call unless I used my speakerphone. I tried dealing with my cellphone carrier on a repair or replacement as it was under warranty. They sent me a "like new" replacement however this "new" phone had more problems then my original. They said they had to work out the replacement phone issues with Apple Care next, otherwise there is nothing else they can do for me. To make a long story short, I told them to pound sand and returned the replacement phone and switched back to my iPhone 4s for the time being. One day I decided I really want to get back to my 5s so I looked into repairing it and found this website.

My Fix

The repair went pretty well. The step by step guide was a big help, wouldn't have tried it without it. The guide was missing a couple steps at the end of the tear down however. There are two more parts that need to be removed from the original lightning connector and headphone jack assembly. There is a small bracket that the home button connection is glued to that has to be removed and installed on the replacement, and the microphone has a small rubber boot around it that has to removed and installed over the replacement microphone. Likely through my research another reviewer point this out so I didn't miss it. Otherwise the repair went just fine with the guide. I was a little mad that the required flat headed screwdriver was mentioned in the guide but not included in the required tools list. I was able to make a screwdriver I had work but I would have liked to have the right size for the job. The only mistakes I had were I got a connector that was next to the battery stuck under the logic board when I was reassembling and didn't notice until I had the board all screwed down. So I had to removed the logic board twice but likely there was no damage. I also had a hard time getting the home button reconnected as the small amount of adhesive wouldn't stick after being removed from the original connector. And I couldn't for the life of me get the securing clip for the home button connection to hook on to the metal hooks on the backside of the connector. I could only snap it in the front which with a little pull pops it out. I spent a good hour trying to hook this clip and ended up just snapping it in the front and putting the phone back together. Not too worried as everything is pretty tight in the phone and its not coming apart again unless something else dies. Overall, I'm glad I decided to purchased the parts and tools and make the repair. Phone is working just like new now.

My Advice

My advice would to purchase all the required tools mentioned in the guide including the flat head screwdriver (2.5mm?). The screws are UNBELIEVABLY small and need these designed magnetic screwdrivers to make it work. Also you will be wise to lay out the steps requiring removal of parts and screws on a piece of paper with some clear or white tape to stick the small parts to so you don't lose them during the repair. Also helps you lay out the screws in order so you don't mix them up when it comes time to reassemble. The website sells a magnetic white board for this purchase if you are only doing the one repair then so some paper and tape work just fine. Also I would advise to just take your time and don't force anything. It took me probably 5 hours from start to finish with 1 hour wasted with trying to hook that clip securing the home button connection. The only thing I wished I had known before I did the repair was about needing the flat head screwdriver, partly my fault as it was mentioned in the guide but wasn't in the tools list so I didn't purchase it, next time I will buy it.

My Problem

The screen on my iphone 5 had gone dead. Except for the home-button-bracket (which was in perfect condition), I decided it would be better to effect a complete replacement of the entire screen assembly. While I was at it, I figured it also would be a good idea to replace the battery.

My Fix

The repair itself went -- everything went off without a hitch, and all works properly. However, there are two maters that require addressing:

1. The covering of the LCD (what most people would call "the screen") has a "loose spot" where it clearly is not attached properly to the LCD. The result of this is that the "loose spot" moves visibly up and down (and makes a clicking sound) when that portion of the covering is pressed. (Side note: I am not entirely certain that the covering of the LCD actually is made of gorilla glass -- I have reason to believe it is made of some type of plastic.)

2. Despite being new, the battery yields talk-time of only between five and six hours. This is the second time I have replaced the battery on this phone (the first time, the battery also was ordered through ifixit), and the first time I did so, the new battery yielded talk-time of around eight hours. The vast discrepancy in quality between the two leads me to believe that there is little in the way of quality control or standards regarding the supplier for ifixit.... and they really need to fixit.

My Advice

Although I was able to attach the home-button-ribbon-cable with just my fingers, it would have been easier with tweezers.

I did not take photos of the process.... just picture an iphone 5, and you will know how everything turned out.

My Problem

I had four screws strip their head. No fault of IFIXIT.

My Fix

I got a stripped head repair kit for Xmas and was able to get the screws out and then back un.

My Advice

Do not think anyone will have the problem I had but if you do get a stripped head kit. The tools from Ifixixit are all you need.

My Problem

Dust entered my iPhone and decided to settle inside the camera lens. I thought this will be impossible to fix but iFixIt came to rescue.

My Fix

It went without a hitch, unscrewed the phone and opened using iSclack. Cleaned things out and closed up again. The only scary moment was detaching the screen as it is not bending away beyond 90deg. This makes it hard to unscrew the tiny bracket philips screws that are holding the screen connectors in place. But it ended up being fine.

My Advice

Some internet videos show that one can pull out the camera without disconnecting the screen, I would not try that, the iPhone screen is very stiffly attached through ribbons to the rest of the iPhone. One might rip the ribbon cables otherwise.

My Problem

That was my eldest kid's phone which had a broken lightining connector and a unnusable camera. I got the chance to change the old battery for a new one too, since it had almost 3 years of use.

My Fix

It was relatively easy to open and disassemble the iPhone, though I had some trouble to reassemble it. I had to reopen the phone cause the digitizer cable wasn't correctly connected, but in the end everything went perfect.

My Advice

Please pay strict attention to the disassemble steps, lest you can get caught with cables you don't know where to connect. And would be important to alert people that the spare parts are different from the originals.

My Problem

Won't boot up

My Fix

Order arrived in reasonable time & good condition. Prybars popped the case of Nexus 7 quickly & undamaged as advertised. Didn't find the quick & easy loose battery connection hoped for but tools were great. Will continue & possibly use other tools as time allows.

My Advice

Best advice may be buy a different tablet, this is not impressive reliability. Thanks to the internet for helpful advice & the link to necessary tools which can be more than 1/2 the battle in repairs like this.

My Problem

GPS was not getting the best signal, so I tried to open up the phone and fix the contact points.

My Fix

Repair went great! I was not sure about opening my phone and thought that it would likely end with me having to buy a new one, but with the tools included I was able to pop off the back with no issues.

My Advice

When replacing the Nexus 5 rear cover, you have to push kind of hard on the back, slightly to the right of the "S", in order to get the NFC antenna to re-attach. At first I though I had ruined my phone, but once I pushed that into place (there was a small "pop" sound when it connected) it worked fine again.