1.5" Thin Putty Knife

$6.95

Product code: IF145-007-1

 
 

1.5" Thin Putty Knife

$6.95

Product code: IF145-007-1

Product Overview

Sneak into tough devices.

  • Use to separate upper and lower cases in tightly attached devices.
  • Perfect for opening the Mac mini or iPod Classic.
  • Fine-tune your knife throwing abilities with this 1.5" putty knife.
  • Does not come with ninja certification.

Product Details

  $6.95

 

Condition:

New

50+ Available

Add to Cart
 

Stories

My Problem

Accidentally our iPod classic fell unto the floor and consequently the harddisc was broken. The best solution seemed to be a replacement of the drive with a CF-card. If there is any pride, you go for it on your own and fix it.

My Fix

To start the opening process I found it easier to use a kitchen knife instead of the plastic opening tool. Afterwards opening the iPod with the proper tools was very easy thanks to your thorough and clear instructions. I didn't think it would be necessary but I actually needed all recommended tools. It's been the first time for many years that I felt the need to take an electronic device radically apart like this.

My Advice

Everything worked out nicely until.... I saw the power cable and was meant to move the lid 1-2 mm. However I had a very strong image in mind of the good old jumper-switches. Remember the ones from the 80s? So I torn out the whole jacket leaving me with lots of little pins flying around. Quite exciting. In order to understand - if at all - what possibly could have gone wrong, I followed the instructions for the other cables and realized how delicate my actions should have been applied. It occured to me progress didn't stop 30 years ago.

Actually I'm looking on the internet for another iPod classic with a broken harddisc and it seems it happens quite often.

Thanks folks! You've got the grumpy old guy out of the woods - willingly hunting for more experience. Hope you all have a little fun with my story.

My Problem

Headphones were cutting in and out

My Fix

The repair was 100% successful. The ipod classic is a real bugger to get apart. (impossible without these instructions and tools) it took longer than we figured. However, since we had the tools and instructions as to how it comes apart and how you do it, we didn't give up. Knowing through pictures what to expect and where you might encounter problems made the process easier because you know you are doing it correctly, it just might take some time. Spending a total of $60 to repair instead of $225 to replace it makes you feel really good about the time and effort and savings. the ipod classic is still the killer in music storage. It was well worth this minor investment. if your eyesight isn't so good, you might want a lighted magnifying glass.

My Advice

The instructions and pictures are really well laid out. Don't get frustrated, just follow the pictures and be prepared to take your time. This is not a fast process so don't try to go fast.

My Problem

I take my iPod to bed - and on a certain day the headphone jack got twisted - and damaged my iPod internally. So: no more music. It was a very very sad day. The most economic way to fix this was to order the required spare parts and tools and do it myself. (If others can do it, I can do it too)

My Fix

Repair went fine but I took my time: about an hour. I Read the instructions thoroughly.

Removing the cover without damaging/bending it was the hardest part. I did not use the plastic opening tools - they were no real help.

My Advice

Take your time and concentrate. Remove tape over cables slow and gently. Watch carefully that the flat cables remain flat - I had a small problem with that. The new cable was bent next to the headphone jack and this resulted in a very distorted sound.

At that point I thought : "My GOD, what have I done!?".

Gently straightening the cable solved the issue and my iPod was as new. Then I taped the cables back on their original places.

Tip 1: order the required tools.

Tip 2: Test your iPod while it is still open, if anything went wrong - you can easily look for the problem without the need to reopen the thing.

Tip 3: keep cats, spouses and children away from the operation quarter.

Couldn't have done it without iFixit though, big thanks guys!

My Problem

The hard drive in my iPod classic failed beyond repair, and I wanted to swap it with an old laptop hard drive.

My Fix

Flawlessly, thanks to the iFixit guide.

My Advice

It's better to be over-prepared than under-prepared, but you can probably do the same with just one plastic opening tool and one spudger.

My Problem

Headphone jack, but hey might as well do the battery too while I got this thing open right?

My Fix

Opening was easy for me. I felt the difficult part was getting the ribbon cables back in the connectors and locked in, but it just took some patience.

My Advice

Fix your Ipod Classic. It is sooooo worth it. No other device with 160GB storage out there and new ones are $500 because they are not made anymore.

My Problem

The lock button was broken and the iPod was always locked despite the position of the switch.

My Fix

It went great. The guide was very informative and made it easy. I took my time and went very slowly reading each step multiple times.

My Advice

The plastic opening tools are not very helpful. If you can get the putty knife in the case without them, you can skip that step. Also don't be afraid to be a little rough with the iPod when inserting the putty knife, as I had to and I still didn't irreversibly bend the case. Ultimately just allot a good amount of time and take your time and it should go well.

My Problem

The jack had just stopped working on my son's iPod. I couldn't bear to junk it, couldn't afford to have it fixed, am just a DIYer at heart. The cost of parts and tools was very reasonable.

My Fix

The toughest part of this job by far was getting the case open at the very first step. Plastic tools were neither tough enough nor sharp enough. The metal spudger might have helped if its tips were sharper, but they were just too blunt (I ended up not using it at all). I ALMOST got into the case with the flat end of the nylon/plastic spudger but it, too, was just slightly too blunt. I ended up (very carefully; mine was pretty sharp) using the large blade of a Swiss Army knife to get enough of an opening into which I could insert the plastic opening tools.

The putty knife was an absolute MUST. I could not have gotten past the small metal one-way tabs that line the inside edges of the back of the case without it. Once you lever in to the opening you've made with the plastic tools, DON"T get too vertical as you force the flat tip of the putty knife downward into the opening. I did this, not realizing how the metal catch mechanism that holds the back panel of the iPod onto the front is attached (spot welded?) around the inside perimeter of the case's back piece. By pressing down too vertically, I caught this metal retainer in one spot and bent it way out of shape. It took some finesse along with force to put it back into place once I had the case completely open. So, once you're able to get the putty knife into the opening, angle it a few degrees (probably only 5-10 degrees ought to do it) as you press it into the case opening. I was surprised how much force was needed to get the putty knife "all the way in" (actually was only maybe 3/16" or 3-4mm). I did not have any difficulty with the corner where the headphone jack is located, as cautioned in the excellent article.

My Advice

I have done a fair amount of small-scale repairs and thought my assortment of Philips screwdrivers would be adequate for the job. But couldn't believe how tiny the retaining screws for the headset jack itself, and the Hold switch are. So if you don't have a size #00, purchase the one offered with the kit. I was lucky enough to have a friend who was a certified Apple Repair outlet for some years, who loaned me this tool.

The nylon spudger was very helpful when manipulating the tiny plastic tabs that hold the ribbon cables in place, and when clicking these back into place during reassembly. Pay close attention to the wording on Step 18 - disconnecting the battery ribbon cable: you only need to lift the hinged plastic retainer clip, not remove the entire plastic connector piece from the circuit board (which was relatively easy for me to do by getting the tip of the spudger down very low into the small opening) - see enlarged photo where the spudger tip is in exactly the right place to lever under this rounded black plastic "clip" to pop it loose.

My Problem

iPod unused for a while and could not figure if it was the battery or the hard drive. With the input of one of your customers I figured it was the battery.

My Fix

I ordered the tools from you guys changed the battery and the iPod works!

My Advice

Listen to the ones that have been there>

My Problem

My iPod Classic was starting to show its age with the battery barely holding much of a charge, couldn't listen to any albums without it nearly dying most of the time. Instead of investing in a new player I felt like repairing the iPod myself since I had an idea how to do it.

My Fix

Great, though the iPod itself is a bit dinged up though that was mostly because of my doing than the tools given by the kit. The battery works, though I accidentally tore the ribbon the hold switch is connected to but I will replace that soon enough.

My Advice

Make sure you know what you are doing and be careful to not ding up your iPod.

My Problem

Mon Ipod classic ne tenait plus la charge qu'une quinzaine de minutes.

My Fix

En suivant la notice d'iFixit j'ai réussi à retrouver les capacités de mon appareil.

My Advice

Devant la compacité de l'appareil il n'est pas évident de forcer dessus. Cependant il ne faut pas hésiter pour accéder à la batterie.