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Trouble with glazing and window repair

Hey, guys.

I'm not sure whether this is the right thread or not, but I'll ask my question here anyways. Let me know if should be moved. So here's it.

My small Sydney home has just undergone an exterior renovation. I'm a DIY-er and I've taken care of most of the small fixes around the house, but I'm not so good with the windows. I've watched a couple of tutorials on the Web and asked around a couple of friends and my quest has taken me to the conclusion that glazing is a rather difficult task. I'd love to get another opinion here about whether or not I should try to do it on my own . Whatever your answer is, please provide me with some additional info on the topic, reference websites, guides and book suggestions are all welcome.

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Cheers,

Mark''

Answered! View the answer I have this problem too

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Hi,

What material are the frames made of?

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Hi jayeff, they are wooden.

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I myself have a century home and with it still have a few windows, that I just haven't got around to replacing ,that require glazing. I find that when I do them its always best to have lots of time an patients. Its also prudent to have new glass on hand to replace the one that inevitably breaks .doing 3 sides is also a good idea i find leaving the bottom strip of old glaze in place till the other 3 sides are puttied in makes the job faster and your less apt to drop glass. I'm not sure where your located but here in Canada I like to use Dap Latex Window Glazing. I use a caulking gun now instead of the putty knife approach. I tape the window off and that way it makes a neater job. I usually give it a day to cure then go back and do the last side the next day. Just be carefull when removing the old putty and clean the surface the best you can before applying the new putty. Hope this helps and good luck with your windows

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Hi Jimfixer, thanks for the answer. I'm from Sydney. I might try this technique out and let you know how it goes.

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Hi Mark,

I'm glad I saw your question. My husband and I were asking our selves the same when we took care of the seasonal repairs at home last year. Jeff is an avid crafter and giving his brilliant woodwork, we thought that dealing with the windows won't be much of a big deal.

We contacted a window supplier and started counting the days till the arrival of our luxury Italian windows. The day finally came and our delivery was in front of our newly renovated house in Sydney. Six bruises and four broken windows later, my hubby and his friend were finally able to bring the windows to the renovation site. Or at least, what was left of them.

In the meantime, our fellow and neighbor Terry, who was also having a complete home redo, decided to book some window cleaning company for the supply and glazier work. In the course of a day, his windows had arrived and were already shining bright on his newly renovated two-story house.

He did pay some extra for choosing to hire a company, but what we paid for shipping another set of windows was a much higher price. Plus, the government has specific regulations for work from height that must be applied whenever it comes to window replacement, roof repair or anything that has to do with a hight higher than 1,5 metres, if I recall right. You can check out more about it in this document by Safe Work Australia.

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Hi Ariella, It's sure is tough working with windows, they are so fragile and quite dangerous if they break.

So what did happen with your windows in the end?

Thanks for the answer and for the heads up with the glazier work and the references.

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Mark Taylor will be eternally grateful.
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