Repair and disassembly guides for SLR, DSLR, and mirrorless interchangeable camera lenses.

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How do I fix the fungus on the lense

I have Cannon EF 18-55 lens and have got fungus on it how do I get rid of it.

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LENS fungi/fungus is a perennial problem among photographers. Expose your lens to just about the right amount of moisture, dust and temperature and the next thing you'll notice are tiny drop-like thing that lingers on its surface, which if left untreated will morph to a whitish radial thing, or asymmetrical thing . Professional photographers would have their gears cleaned by a qualified technician but some enthusiast will find it too expensive. I have had 3 fungi infested lenses which I cleaned myself. May I remind those who want to try this though, having your gears maintained by a qualified personnel is the best option specially if you have no experience in fixing lenses or if you no technical training or if doing it yourself will void your gear's warranty. Follow these instructions only under extreme circumstances and I WILL NOT BE LIABLE TO ANY DAMAGES OR LOSS CAUSED BY FOLLOWING THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

The procedures below will require the use of common house cleaning substances. Its efficacy depends on how long the fungi has infested your lens, how deep they have embedded themselves into the surface and how far they have spread. Pls consider these steps before cleaning the lenses:

1st: survey the lenses- your lens would most likely contain more than 5 lenses from the outer lenses to the inner lenses.

2nd: determine how far your willing to take risks, IF YOUR LENS HAS IMAGE STABILIZATION FEATURE, you are more likely to damage the lens attached to the image stabilization motor if you touch it unless you are trained.

If you have decided to finally proceed then follow the steps below:

-- If the fungus is new and is outside the lens, use cotton buds w/ 1 part water and 1 part hydrogen peroxide. Squeeze it a bit then rub the lens w/ light to medium pressure, let dry, then try again until the fungus is removed. If it doesn't remove the fungi then try pure hydrogen peroxide.

If the fungus has invaded the inner barrel, then you will have to open the lens then follow the above instruction.

--I the fungi has been embedded on the lens surface for sometime then hydrogen peroxide MAY not work. consider using one part 0.1 sodium hypocrite solution and one part water, using the same method of rubbing the lens as described above. if the fungi doesnt bulge, then use pure 0.1 sodium hypocrite solution. Remember that Sodium hypocrite may strip the lens of its valuable filter coatings so use it only when necessary.

Finally, consider acquiring a dry box or making a cheap one for yourself to prevent the recurring fungal infestation (once a lens is infested, it will most likely get infested again)

to make a dry box get the following materials:

- Airtight plastic food storage container(translucent/transparent) = $5.00 -$10.00 USD

- Hygrometer = $2.00 USD

- Silicone desiccators = $3.00 USD

Once you have all the materials, glue the hygrometer to the surface from the inside. Put your camera and lenses inside. put the desiccators then seal the container airtight. watch the hygrometer register from 40-50 units in 30mins, that is your sweetspot.

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