[Early 2014/model number WS-50/black or white] Automatically syncs your weight, fat composition, heart rate and environmental data to your personalized online dashboard accessible on the free health mate app

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Withings WBS01 Scale won't power on?

The battery has leaked in my Withings scales (WBS01) and I need to open it to clean it and check for breaks on the battery terminals.

I cannot figure out how to open it to have a look at the damage inside. I cannot find any guide or hints online on how to go about opening it.

I don't want to damage it as I suspect it's just a bad connection somewhere. It responds over USB ok and I can configure it. But I cannot get past the wifi config as it ask me to insert the batteries (which I have).

I hope some of you can shed some light on it.

Shot of battery compartment: http://www.macmaniacs.at/wp-content/uplo...

Shot of scales: http://9to5toys.files.wordpress.com/2014...

Thanks for any help

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I have de same problem, and I cant' find answers. Do you know where to send it to repair?

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No and I would like to fix it.

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I have the exact same problem!

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I have same issue? Have you found any solution?

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I had the same problem. I carefully scraped the corroded contacts and then used a contact cleaner and viola! it worked. This scale is not meant to be repaired.

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Sorry I did not take pictures, but I recently disassembled a WS-50 which appears to have a similar design.

First, make sure you have cleaned the battery terminals of any visible corrosion, since this could save you from taking it apart.

The glass top is adhered to the plastic housing on its four corners using circular adhesive pads. The center metallic button is also adhered to the top of the glass with a circular adhesive pad.

On the WS-50, The center aluminum button's sensor is attached to the PCB via a single wire. Additionally, there are four clip style sensors clipped to the glass beneath the button. These sensors are also attached to the PCB with one wire each. You will need to first take apart the center button/sensor array before you can separate the glass sheet from the lower plastic housing.

If you only want to take a peak inside, and don't plan on removing/repairing connections, then you could just separate the four corners. You are limited to about 1-2 inches of separation of the glass from the lower plastic housing, due to the wire connections running to the center button, so there really isn't much you can do other than visually inspect the inside with a flashlight.

You can do this without a heatgun, but you'll most likely damage the adhesive pads on the four corners when trying to separate them. This may not be a problem depending on the extent of damage, or if you have a means of replacing the adhesive, but fair warning.

Step 1) Disassemble center button sensor:

Use a heatgun on the center aluminum button to loosen the adhesive, and insert a flat plastic spudger, working your way around the edge until it completely separates.

The sensor itself is a flat square sheet of copper, and is very delicately sandwiched between the aluminum button housing, and an inner plastic frame on the underside of the button.

Run a flat spudger or fingernail between the plastic and aluminum pieces, to separate them. Once the top aluminum housing is removed, you can delicately separate the flat sensor from the plastic frame, and remove the circular plastic frame.

Now, slide off the clip sensors from the glass sheet. You should have 5 separate sensors attached to the pcb.

Step 2) Remove glass top

Use a heat gun on each of the four corners of the glass top to loosen the adhesive.

Insert a plastic flat edge tool between the plastic housing and glass (at the visible seam where they meet), and separate one corner at a time, until all four corners' adhesive pads are separated and the glass panel can be removed.

Be mindful of the display while you perform this step, and don't run your flat tool in this area. Keep a good grip on the glass, so that it doesn't fall off when you separate the adhesive pad.

Carefully remove the glass panel, being careful not to damage the sensors in the middle. You may need to turn the scale on its edge to get a good enough grip to separate the panel, since the adhesive is so strong.

Once you've separated the glass, place it somewhere safe. If you need to remove the PCB to inspect the underside, there are two phillips screws holding it in place. The display is connected to the PCB via a flat cable, and this too should be detached, prior to removing the PCB.

Again, sorry I didn't take pictures or a video, but let me know if you have any other questions.

Step 3) Reassembly:

Reverse the above steps, but when you reattach the clip sensors, they will need to line up with the holes in the circular plastic button housing. So use this as a guide for proper placement.

Also, firmly(!) press on the adhesive rings/adhesives to make a strong bond.

Good Luck!

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Now just scapped my second set of these scales. Both failed after 12-24 months.

Thanks for the teardown. I managed to get in, but no loose wires or clear problem area to fix.

I took photos along the way. See google docs.

https://goo.gl/photos/gmzFWdz769qiL42f6

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The center disc came off very easily, but the 4 corner adhesive pads too quite a bit of leverage.

Also I had to cut the wire to the centre disc to remove the glass plate. The plan was to solder this back together if I got it working. The display ribbon cable came out by releasing the catch, but the circuit board was glued to the back plate.

Unless it is a loose wire, you would need to be an electronic engineer to fix it.

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I have one that suddenly stopped working, but before I opened it I was suspicious of the battery contacts, and bingo - adding a little solder to the + end of the last battery brought it back to life.

Amazing how convoluted a product can be and yet fails for the simplest reasons.

They need to redesign that battery holder.

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NO DISPLAY - Problem Solved.

Cleaning (scraping) as suspect battery terminal brought mine back to life.

The terminals looked OK, but there was one with the slightest hint of corrosion.

I scraped it clean with a small flat blade screwdriver, inserted the good tested batteries and it booted up.

The voltage between the positive end of the left battery and the negative end of the right battery when viewed with the batteries closest to you should be +6.3 VDC with fresh batteries.

Thanks for the corrosion tip below, it worked for me. I would not have gotten any further had I opened it and poked around.

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How about this? Withings Smart Body Analyzer Motherboard Replacement

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Donie will be eternally grateful.
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