Repair guides for an Epiphone SG electric guitar.

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How do I prevent my guitar's input jack from loosening?

The input jack on my Epiphone SG electric guitar keeps loosening after several hours of (nonconsecutive) play. I don't want to strip the backing plate screws by removing the plate to tighten the jack once a week! The jack on this model is on the front face of the guitar.

Other than looping the cable through the guitar's strap to prevent excess pressure on the jack, what's a good solution to this problem?

Possible ideas I've thought of include loc-tite (which I'd rather avoid) and replacing the jack's washers with larger diameter ones to prevent the tension from compressing the wood.

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Try nailpolish?

I used nailpolish a lot inside computer cases, used special shades to show tampering, or just clear ro set strews in place. comes off easy enough even without nailpolish remover.

Just borrow some clear overcoat and give it a shot on the nut of the jack

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After reading this suggestion I searched for more info online and it sounds like this is a fairly common solution to this [fairly common] problem. It seems like a good strategy if it works well, especially considering it won't prevent intentional loosening and removal of the jack.

I'm going to have to pick up some nail polish!

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I have used nail polish with much success.

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There are different grades of Loc-tite™ Thread locker available. Red high strength, Blue medium etc. Normally you apply a small amount to each part before assembly. Also there is a penetrating grade that you apply after assembly. Be careful not to get any of the product on plastic parts or the finish of your axe as certain plastics will be damaged.

I have used teflon tape to prevent dart shafts from coming loose from the barrels and many players use small "O" rings which compress and work much like a lock washer does keeping tension between the shaft and barrel.

As a last solution you can try turning your amp down!! ; )

Rok n Roll!

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Checking out the Loctite website now. I had no idea there were so many varieties -- I'd only used the higher strength one on automotive applications. This is great information, thanks.

I think I'm still going to give nail polish a try since it seems a little safer but the wicking loctite for preassembled parts is pretty tempting...

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Lock-Tite thread locker. It's cheap and keeps the nuts in place.

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The only thing that worries me about Loctite is how hardcore it is. I don't want to prevent myself from ever being able to remove the jack.

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I wonder if the Gibson SG's have the same problem. It could be a matter of cheaper parts.

Another suggestion would be to stick a small piece of paper in the threads to engage the nut better.

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I've heard that they use cheaper wood on the Epiphones that perhaps compresses more easily under the nuts. Not sure if that's true though.

Paper is an interesting idea!

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Here is what I did. I took out the jack and stuffed (really hard) steel wool, the stuff you clean pots with, into the screw holes. Then the screws fastened real tight. Much better than glueing which is not very reversible!

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Are you sure it was "steel wool"? I don't like the idea of mixing fine metal shavings with anything electronic. Could you mean the Scotchbrite stuff that sometimes replaces steel wool for cleaning?

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Yes, I have used steel wool to fill up screw holes that have worked themself too hallow. Works pretty good, but for this problem I added nail polisher and that adds a lock to the screw. And I have a chance to reverse it. With glue you may never get out that screw. Steel wool and nail polish! Great :-)

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try installing a lockwasher between the nut & flat washer. They are fairly flat (not like the split type used on mechanical machines etc) and are radially serrated either along the outside or inside.

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Replace the nut with another nut and do not over tighten. If that doesn't fix it perhaps the threads on the jack are damaged. If it is a plastic bodied jack chances are it is the jack. As far as the loctite is concerned it is an ok idea but may not hold. Nail polish may work better. It is an old tech trick used to keep adjustment pots from moving as well as by manufaturers to keep nuts and screws from working loose and to detect tampering for warranty claims!

Before applying the loctite be sure it is CLEAN. Loctite doesn't work if the parts are oily or wax coated and may not work on plastics. Also Loctite is anerobic that is it won't cure in the presence of air, that's why it stays liquid in the bottle. The one or two threads on the jack nut may not be enough for the loctite to cure.

To Remove something that has been "locked" with loctite heat it. Loctite is a plastic and heating will cause it to melt and allow the item to be loosened. For small nuts and screws the tip of a soldering iron works well. Most Loctite is good up to about 250 or 300 degrees F. Although there are some grades that are made for high temp applications most grades are not and that includes the "stud lock" grades.Consult loctite's web site for specifics.

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http://www.ehow.com/how_6743575_repair-j...

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Had the same problem with mine,i replaced it with a new jack. No problems since.

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rationull will be eternally grateful.
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