Comprehensive set of repair manuals for Android tablets manufactured by Samsung, including the Note 10.1 and the Tab.

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Busted Samsung Galaxy Tab S screen/digitizer, need parts or repair

I repaired my own Nexus 7 when it cracked (twice, don't ask), but when it cracked even slightly it was unusable.

This Samsung Galaxy Tab S 10.1 inch still works though the glass looks like a maze.

Is just the outer glass separable from the digitizer, or do I have the wrong idea and need to replace them both?

The Nexus was intense to repair, but with caution it was easier than I thought it would be. Can I use that experience on the Galaxy Tab S too?

Answer this question I have this problem too

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Also looking for this info.

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Did you find the glass replacement? Mine broke as well and I'm having a rough time finding one

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I ran into a Samsung tech guy and he gave me some insight. I'll post the info when it all jells, when I find out what my options are.

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Also need this info.

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My Samsung Tabb S screen cracked and I am looking to replace it?

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Black Friday
Broken doesn't stand a chance.

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I am an experienced cell and tablet repair tech, and have some insight. I too cracked my tab s 8.4 glass several months ago. I figured that like all AMOLED (as far as I know at least) screens in Samsung devices, the glass was bonded to the LED with LOCA. I've repaired the glass on hundreds of Galaxy S3/S4/S5 during the last 3 years, and the way I do it takes about 10-20 minutes (depending on how much the glass is actually shattered). Granted, an 8.4 or 10.1 inch screen is at least 3 times the surface area of any of Samsung's smartphone lineup, so it should take more time. That being said, there is a way to replace the glass of any AMOLED screen if you have the right tools.

As a disclaimer, I should warn anyone before trying to repair any glass on an AMOLED screen. You should be aware that you will require both LOCA AND a UV curing "oven" (<-- that's what I call it) to correctly repair these screens. Most of you probably know this but for those that don't, LOCA stands for "Liquid Optically Clear Adhesive" and is an absolute necessity for replacing cracked glass on most if not all AMOLED screens. Using regular adhesive around the edges of the glass replacement will result in an ugly and dysfunctional touch screen, and will eventually fall off and/or fail. Even if you purchase the correct LOCA, it is useless without having a UV oven to cure it. That being said, if you can have the necessary tools at your disposal, the following is how I repair AMOLED screens to an almost new condition.

So, as I've said, you will require some UV cured LOCA, and a way to cure that LOCA as well. Also, you will need a way to carefully heat up the screen during the repair procedure. Personally, I use a temperature controlled heat gun. I read that some of you use a temp controlled hot plate which can work I suppose, but I strongly suggest using a heat gun with the ability to set the temperature. The ability of a heat gun to heat up specific areas of the glass on demand makes the method I use much easier. You will also need a very thin pry tool (I use a very sharp and very thin razor blade), a pair of gloves that will protect you from heat, and most importantly... a roll of thin steel or kevlar wire. I'm not sure of the gauge I use, but it's as thin as strong fishing line. Oh, and obviously, you will need a replacement glass panel for your particular device.

Alrighty... Now, I'll explain the procedure. To begin, I turn the heat gun up to 300 degrees C. A lot of you will think that is high, and you're right.. but I like having it up high so the screen heats up fast. DISCLAIMER: IT IS VERY IMPORTANT TO NEVER HOLD YOUR HEAT GUN OVER ANY PARTICULAR PLACE ON THE SCREEN FOR MORE THAN A SECOND OR TWO AT THIS TEMPERATURE!! It's very easy to destroy the LCD even through the glass relatively quickly, and if you see any unusual discoloring behind the glass while heating, just give up. The LCD will work, but there will be no way to ever buff out that blemish, and you might as well just replace the entire screen assembly if it happens. Also, always look up information about the hardware configuration of the screen you're working on. AMOLED screens have the touch screen integrated in the display itself and have both a display flex cable as well as a digitizer flex cable. This is important because you need to be weary of cutting or damaging the digi flex while you start to pry the glass up. For instance, the Galaxy S4 digi flex is in the upper left corner of the screen. Anyway, start to evenly heat up the very top of the screen where the Samsung logo is. After a few seconds of heating, use your razor (or whatever pry tool you decided on) to go underneath the glass and start to pry it up. It may be important to note at this point that LOCA is only used where the glass is transparent, while normal adhesive is used on the top and bottom parts (the colored portions. Make sure to use the heat gun to keep the area you're prying up warm enough to loosen the adhesive underneath. Continue prying around the top of the screen, until you've separated the adhesive in the top portion of the device only. Do NOT accidentally puncture the actual display. Once the glass on the upper part of the device has been sufficiently separated from the frame/screen, start to lightly and evenly heat up the glass of the upper area of the display, lightly prying up on the glass at the very top of the device. You should notice the glass starting to peel away from the display, causing the screen to look like it has blurry gel under it. At this point, put your gloves on, and pull out a piece of steel wire about 18 inches long. wrap each end around a finger of both hands, and start to thread the wire in between the glass that you just pryed up and the screen/frame of the device. Now comes the slightly tricky part. You need to start evenly heating up the screen below the wire, and when its pretty warm to the touch, start to pull the wire down the screen underneath the glass. The heating weakens the LOCA, and we're basically using the wire like a cheese cutter, warming the LOCA then slowly pulling the wire down. You will have to repeatedly heat up the glass down below the wire several times, heating, then pulling, then heating, then pulling, until finally you reach the bottom of the screen and are able to start prying the glass left at the bottom from the regular adhesive just like you did at the top. It is not as easy as I made it sound, and it is VERY important that you take your time and not force anything. When the glass is severely shattered, it's common for the wire to get snagged on the edge of a shard or crack in the glass. If this happens, use your razor to gently pry and lift the edge of the screen where the wire got snagged, making sure that again, THE SCREEN IS WARM where you pry!

If all goes well, the glass should eventually come off leaving a screen covered in a now cloudy substance that feels like rubber to the touch. This is the LOCA. I read in someones answer above that they used a tool to peel the LOCA away. I DO NOT RECOMMEND THIS!! The LCD is easily punctured and damaged so using a tool to peel the LOCA away is dangerous. All you need to do is use your fingers :). You will find areas of the screen where the actual LCD is visible because the LOCA was pulled away by the wire. With a finger (I use my thumb), pull down with some pressure on the exposed area of LCD and start to peel the LOCA down slowly. If done correctly, the LOCA will be easily taken off after a good bit of attention. It's tedious, but once you've finished, you'll have a screen that's mostly LOCA free. At this point, I use a little googone with a microfiber cloth to scrub away anything that may be on the screen. Don't worry about making the screen spotless. A few blotches of LOCA left is perfectly acceptable and will disappear when you put the new LOCA on for the replacement glass.

After the screen is sufficiently clean, you should remove the old adhesive on the top and bottom of the display area and replace it with some new double sided, typical adhesive. There's a bunch of places online that sell precut adhesive for almost any particular device which makes it a lot easier to apply and covers the maximum area of the screen without blocking any sensors/buttons/etc. Just to give some advice, you should cut several thin slices of adhesive (about 1mm thin) that's the length of the width of your devices screen. I use it to put at the very top and bottom borders of where the actual LCD meets the area with the precut adhesive you previously applied, and lay it the entire width of the LCD, edge to edge. Put at least three layers of the same thinly sliced adhesive on top of each other. This is used as a kind of barrier to protect the sensors at the top and home button/capacitive buttons at the bottom from being covered with LOCA prior to it curing. DON'T SKIP THIS STEP!! If you do, say goodbye to your front camera and a responsive home button. Now, I'm gonna try to explain this as best I can, but I understand that a video is probably necessary to fully explain. Grab your LOCA. Applying to LOCA correctly is tricky, because it's easy to put way too much, and also important to make sure the entire LCD will be covered with it once you start putting on the new glass. I start towards the upper part of the LCD about 3/4 of an inch from the top edge of it, and make a V. Try to keep the line of LOCA around a half cm in width as you apply it, slowly making a V. Then, from the bottom of the "V", make a line going down about an inch or so long, followed by finally, another upside-down V at the bottom. Keep the top of the V's at least 3/4s of an inch or so away from the top and bottom of the device. Now you're ready to start putting the new glass on. Make sure to have your UV light source on and ready. Start laying the glass down very gently, starting from the top of the device. Push the top of the glass into the precut adhesive you applied earlier, and let the glass start to fall on top of the LOCA. You will see the LOCA start to spread out over the LCD, and may see a couple of air bubbles. This is ok. While keeping firm pressure on the upper portion of the glass, allow the glass to go down far enough so that 2/3rds of the display underneath is coated in LOCA. It's important to keep a firm pressure on the top portion of the glass. When the LOCA has covered most of the LCD, you'll start to have some of it overflow out the sides of the device/glass. This is expected and perfectly fine. Anyway, keeping the pressure (if pressure is released, the LOCA will recede from the edges allowing air pockets to come back), start holding the device so that the upper portion (which should be down in it's final permanent position) under the UV source, double checking that all air bubbles have been pushed out through the sides of the device. Don't let the bottom portion under the UV yet or it will start to cure with out being fully seated to the display. Hold the upper portion under the UV for about 2 to 3 minutes. This allows the LOCA to cure just enough to hold it's own for the time being. After a few minutes, check the status by releasing some pressure from the upper portion. If you don't see any air pockets forming in the upper corners after a several seconds, the LOCA has started to cure. I like to be safe and follow up by curing the top portion for another few minutes. It's possible for the LOCA to trick you and if it is only cured a little, it will form air pockets very slowly. So, after making sure the top is bonded, continue to push the glass down until the final portion of the LCD is covered, and repeat the process for the bottom portion of the device, firmly applying pressure on the glass until the LOCA can hold. When both top and bottom are cured enough to hold, put the entire device under the UV light. I keep it in there for 30-40 minutes to be safe, but I'm assuming that the timing necessary really depends on the wavelength and wattage of whatever UV source you're curing with. After 30-40 minutes, pull the device out. There will probably be cured and oily LOCA all over the device. It should peel off, and you can use some goo gone or whatever to clean up any mess.

So, I just realized how long this answer has become lol, and I'm thinking that this sort of procedure is definitely best learned by watching an experience tech do it in a video, so my apologies if this was horribly written and way too long. The entire repair should take about an hour and a half with a small device and I'm guessing 2-3+ hours in a device the size of a tab S. If anyone is interested in me making a video of this type of repair (maybe even my tab S if I can find the replacement glass by itself somewhere!), let me know. I can't even find a tutorial on this repair on youtube, which is crazy, so I'm more than happy to make one myself. I hope I didn't completely waste my time with this and that at least a LITTLE of the information I shared helped someone!

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Yes. I would love to check out a video on this repair. I think I saw the glass alone sold for $20 if all you need is the glass. I'm in that position luckily I think if I can fix it myself. It seems I do not need to replace the entire screen assembly which is cost prohibitive at nearly $200...if which case I might as well by a new tablet. Give me a sec.... Here is the site with both the entire screen assembly or just the glass --> http://www.parts4repair.com/samsung-gala...

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Please make the video and give the link..ur expertise are much needed..already bought the glass but my confidence level are not tat without watching any tutorials..tools gathered,uv lamp checked,loca glue and remover checked, and hot blower checked. Just need a video guidance from u.

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The only guide that comes close to watching a video tutorial. I spent two nights on youtube searching for a video guide and not a single video exists. A video would be highly, highly appreciated. Thank you so much for this guide!

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thts the best thing kindly make a video we all will be happy

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I just removed my digitizer glass from my Samsung Tab S 10.5 T800. It isn't loca glued, just adhesive on edges (non viewing area). It is very easy to damage lcd though, because ribbon cable for it wrap around front edge of lcd and can be cut by prying tools. Trick is to not allow tool to go in too far and try to avoid using metal tools. Smaller Amoled tablets such as cell phones are often loca glued.

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David is correct, the display assembly for the Galaxy Tab S (SM-T700) is indeed fused together as one piece. Separating is possible but not easily done, and the chance of success is very, very low. The display assemblies are quite expensive now for this unit also, ranging from $180 US and up. If your screen still works (because the digitizer is a part of the AMOLED) then I would suggest using some thick 3M packaging tape to cover the screen, making sure the tape is as tight as possible on the unit. This helps prevent cuts, keeps the glass in place better and can help tide you over until the display assemblies drop in price. Good luck!

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i thought he meant seperating the glass from digitizer, doh

i don't think the tab s is bonded any tighter then the nexus 7, is it? if he's managed to do the nexus 7 i think he will be fine with the tab s

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The glass (digitizer) isn't glued to lcd with loca glue, just adhesive on edges. It is different from amoled cell phones.

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Okay. ....I'll try to see where I can get the whole new screen/digitizer assy. I've been quoted $350 parts and labor which I think is kinda stiff for something that costs $495 originally.

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I recently finished removing the cracked outer glass as well as the LOCA glue from an sm-t800 (galaxy tab s 10.5). This process is very time consuming and tedious (took me a combined 10 hours give or take spread over a month). If you do not have experience, don't expect it to look like new if you're successful.

I went into this thinking it would be just as complex as a nexus 7 but the smaller tablets are much easier to work on. Imagine twice the work as the nexus 7 job. Get yourself a good metal tool for removing the glass, I used a razor blade to start off and once I got about an inch and a half from the edges I switched to a metal spudger with a thin, flat, somewhat pointed tip.

Start near the top edges and work your way to the home button. I kept the screen at a temp of 90-110 celsius, If i was focusing on one segment of glass I kept a radius of 3 inches around that segment evenly warm at that temp range, (this avoids brown overheating spots and allows the glue to cool at a slower rate.)

As you work your way across the screen you will develop different methods of lifting the glass away and understand how to adjust your pressure and heat distribution.

Once all the glass is off now the tricky part begins. I ordered some LOCA removing liquid online but that stuff is useless, its just rubbing alcohol and water. So I got stuck and decided to say screw it and just use a razor blaze. So I started at the top edges of the glass once again, this time eating away at the glue. depending on the angle and pressure you put on the blade, you will most likely give the lcd a good amount of scratches. I saw that these scratches were pretty deep so I switched tools to another thin flat metal spudger that I had and used it similar to how you would use a chisel. (Come to think of it... A small chisel might have worked well too.) Either way, The lcd will get scratched up, nothing to avoid that. I found very helpful to drop some of the loca remover/Rubbing alcohol on the parts of glue I was trying to work at, this helped relieve some scratches, I also used my heat gun to very lightly to warm up the glue as I worked through the LOCA.

I worked toward the direction of the home button because the digitizer cables are attached along that bottom edge and bottom right corner.

after most of the glue was gone, I used the rubbing alcohol and the chisel-like tool to scrape away little fragments of LOCA and carefully went along the digitizer connections to remove the glue. As of right now, I do not have touch input but all of the cables look untouched and have no cuts or nicks. Ill have to look at all of the connections and make sure evertyhings secure.

I'll mention that I didn't have an eye dropper to use with the rubbing alcohol so I used a straw and my finger to simulate one, easy solution to thaat.

So thats what I've learned so far, To sum up... try to have patience like a buddhist monk and be very careful. The tools make the job so test out on another already broken assembly if you have one at your disposal and dont force anything, the heat gun is your best friend.

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Something wrong here! Both the video on Utube and my own experience (just did one) says that loca glue isn't used on Samsung Galaxy Tab S T800. It is just edge glued.

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If you seperated the digitizer from the LCD then well done because that's a task in its self. The digitizer is bonded very tightly to the LCD which makes separating very hard. If it helps, my Nexus 7 had a very thin crack on the glass and that meant the touch would not work anywhere near that area. I was forced to rotate the tablet to get it at different angle.

The glass/digitizer is one unit, I don't think separating is possible.

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I seperated the glass from a tab 3 8" and it was tough!!!!

I was using a heatplate designed for phones, so only done a section at a time.

Went through all that and painstakingly removing the glue.

And it all went wrong when using the LOCA. On this model, it seeped into the backlight layers. But now that AMOLED is used, if it's anything like the phones it should be sealed.

If you are going to replace the lcd anyway, give it a shot, you got nothing to lose. But it will be a slow process!

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Hi to all

I have a SAMSUNG TAB S SM-705 WiFi and 4G LTE one with a broken glass.

I can use it also where the glass is broken cause the touchscreen works good.

But I would like to replace the glass of this unit. I do not want to pay about 200$ for the glass and about 50$ for manpower just because the new one costs about 400$ now and I payed 200$ second hand.

So what to do?

I would like to suggest you and myself to buy such protective glass film that are sold on ebay at about 10$/15$ and put it one or two in place of the broken glass. Ok oosurely I will lose the Samsung Logo but maybe could be a replacement.

Are you agree? do you think there are any contraindications?

how can I remove the broken glass on the existing tablet without making a mess? can I remove with a spray glue? or with a nylon wire?

Suggestions?

Pat

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I saw the glass alone sold for $20 if all you need is the glass. I'm in that position luckily I think if I can fix it myself. It seems I do not need to replace the entire screen assembly which is cost prohibitive at nearly $200...if which case I might as well by a new tablet. Give me a sec.... Here is the site with both the entire screen assembly or just the glass --> http://www.parts4repair.com/samsung-gala...

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You have the right idea. All you need to replace is the outer glass that plugs into the digitizer. Have fun

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I thought the same thing, but I damaged the LCD as I was unplugging it...so be careful, or it will cost more than a new Tab S.

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Hi guys,

I bought a Tab S 10.5 wifi at the end of 2014 and love the thing to bits. You really couldnt get me off it.

Now im a baker and am getting up for work at all hours of the morning. Now getting up for work one morning being pitch black and not being able to see anything around me ive ended up stepping on top off my Tab S and completely ruined it by smashing the LCD.

After months of trying to search for a way of salvage rhe only i can find is to buy the full screen assembly which is $260+ but after paying that and labour im better off just buying a new one yes?

So ive bought a new one and still want to get the old one fixed. Would anyone be able to help me with a cheaper screen assembly or repair?

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There are many LCD suppliers in aliexpress for 160$ whole assembly kit, here is one for cheap:

http://goo.gl/WHs7RK

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My note 10.1 2014 glass digitizer was very badly repaired where lot of dark areas in the screen now. Is it possible re-replace the digitizer again.please advice

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If it has dark areas on the screen then its not the digitizer but the LCD.

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I bought the replacement glass screen then proceeded to remove glass shards. IT WAS A LONG PROCESS. As someone mentioned above, please take your time. It took me about 3.5 days working on it for 3-4 hrs at a time but it all came off. As I was removing the glass I did put to ribbing back in to see if my work was in vain, it wasn't thank GOD. Don't expect it to look like new when said and done. Also get some good cleaner and some tweezers for removing the small glass shards that dig into the lcd protective layer. I have my local and uv lamp on the way and I'll see how it turns out when done. I'll keep you all updated when finished. If it doesn't look good when done then I'll buy the assembly replacement and move everything over. I only paid $75 for mine. Xb

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To recap: bought a busted screen tab s and successful repaired it myself. It can be done. Mine works great as it did before. If your looking to sale yours because of broken screen then let me know. Looking to buy another. If needing again help or advice plain can't act me.

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how much will it cost to replace the display screen on my Samsung stab

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I cracked the screen on my Tab S and discovered that for some unknown reason, the digitizer is 'glued' to the glass screen, so you need to replace both the glass AND the digitizer. I'm told the digitizer alone costs about $200. U.S.

I don't think it would be wise to pay for both, PLUS repair costs to wind up with a repaired tablet... repaired stuff is often never the same again.

Take a deep breath and go buy a new one!

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I have a tab sm-t802 and the lcd and digitizer are all one not like the old tab2/3

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I talked to a Samsung tech guy about repairing tablet screens. He said most 10 inch tablets aren't loca glued because of the difficulties in manufacturing them. The downside is that non-loca screens are more fragile, which is why most cell phones use loca. I have done a second sm-t800 which was held together with double sided tape. The first one I botched by accidentally cutting through led cable which wraps around to the front of led (between led and digitizer glass). Pushing separator tool in too far cuts the ribbon cable. Then you are into led replacement as well. I picked up another non-smoking tablet on e-bay and made one out of the two (similar cost to replacing led, but less work and risk).

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Yes they are separable, be prepared to be very frustrated. Get molybdenum wire .008 and a heat gun... take your time work the wire between the LCD and the glass, do not pry once the glass is off take your finger and rub the loca off then clean real good and reassemble

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