Click Image To Zoom

 
 

iPod Touch Gen 3 Front Panel Assembly

$69.95

Product code: IF176-001-1

Product Overview

The desire to touch another's face is as instinctual as pummeling your landlord's nephew is brazen. Since time began, man has sought opportunities to smear mascara, pinch cheeks, and steal noses. Regrettably, this instinct has also translated to the abuse of millions of clocks, and the cracking of thousands of iPod Touches.

Give your 3rd Gen iPod Touch the chance to face the world again with our front panel assembly. This assembly includes the touchscreen glass, integrated digitizer, metal frame, and home button.

NOTE: This part is only compatible with model A1318 iPod Touches. If your iPod Touch is model A1288 you should purchase an iPod Touch Gen 2 Front Panel Assembly.

Compatibility

Identify your iPod

  • All 3rd Generation iPod Touches (Model A1318)

Product Details

  $69.95

 
 

Condition:

New

Warranty:

6 month warranty

Add to Cart »

3 Available

Quantity:

 

Install Videos

 

Compatibility

iPod Touch 3rd Generation
32 GB
64 GB
 

Stories

My Problem

My daughter, off to college, downloaded some software to her iPod to help her keep up her workout routine. It had something to do with running around campus, making believe that zombies were chasing you, with the iPod telling you what to do. Well, that's all well and good, except if you're carrying your iPod around in your hand. Eventually, some smart thinking zombie is going to knock that thing out of your hand, leaving you without desperately needed instructions? Do I stay? Do I go? Do I just open my neck and say "have at it, fellas"? And that is pretty much what happened, with the iPod crashing to the ground, leaving us with a functional iPod with a screen that looked like a spider web. Sliding a finger around on that touch screen could go uneventfully, or result in a moment of pain and a finger with a new sparkly personality. Looking at the cost of a new iPod and then looking in her wallet, and finding a, um, "mismatch", we decided to give the repair route a go. I figured even if the iPod gets trashed in the process, we're really no worse off, since the screen was going to eventually fail anyway.

My Fix

We ordered a replacement screen, and some tools. The information available from iFixit made acquiring the right parts very easy with only a few minutes of research. The parts arrived within a few days (and this was over the Christmas holidays), and I set to work. Following the step by step instructions, as well as the video that's also available, I was able to pretty easily make the replacement and the iPod is now much happier, as is my daughter. We are also going through less band-aids.

My Advice

Number one, make sure that you have good lighting in your work area. Bright light makes it much easier to see what's going on, and you're going to be working in some tight spaces and with some delicate parts. I personally found the metal spudger to be a better tool for prying out the old screen, and used the plastic opening tools primarily as "placeholders" as I worked my way around the screen. The metal tool, being thinner, got into the space around the front panel easier. Just be careful about how deep you stick in the spudger. The plastic tools by their nature don't go in very far, but the metal tool can get in there pretty far. Just be careful with it and your first couple of "prys" will tell you how far you need to go. You only need to go in about an 1/8 of an inch to get behind the panel to pry it out. The other thing to watch out for is the little cable that goes from the front panel to the iPod circuitry. It actually terminates in a teeny tiny little plug that needs to be undone and then redone with the new panel. The plug basically just pulls straight up and popping it off is pretty easy once you figure out how it's connected. Getting the new one connected was probably the hardest part of the whole procedure ("hardest" meaning it took me about 5 minutes of trying). You can't see the connections very well, and it has to be lined up correctly to engage. I used a pair of tweezers and one of the plastic opening tools to maneuver and push it into place. Once that's done, you just gently but firmly push the new panel into place (it should be flush with the frame with no raised edges), and if things went well, you're done!

My Problem

Cracked/Shattered IPod Front Panel Touchscreen - Seemed a shame to throw-away the bulk of a still-working tool. As the total cost of sending it to a qualified repair shop reached 33% of the cost of replacement, alternatively repairing it at home for about half that cost seemed appropriate.

My Fix

The replacement Front Panel arrived w/in two business days of ordering from IFixit. A good thing.

Although installation video claimed 3rd gen and 2nd gen IPod replacement procedures were virtually the same, significant differences between the two were found - e.g., "locking tabs" for 3rd gen were not physically the same as described and presented in the video and installation guide. Not a great thing, but acceptable.

The Plastic Opening Tools, although exquisitely molded, were found to be somewhat less structurally-sound than anticipated from, let alone as presented on, IFixit's web page. Had I not bought two sets of Plastic Opening Tools, the repair may not have been successful on the first attempt. Not a good thing, but, still, acceptable.

My Advice

One, update your video and installation guide to reflect the true nature of the "locking tabs" in a 3rd gen IPod.

Two, the Plastic Opening Tools appear to be constructed of a polyester resin. Although this class of plastic does offer some advantages for such a tool - electrical non-conductivity comes to mind - "bend-deformation strength" is clearly not one of them, as the tool suffers rapid degradation (chipping, sloughing of its working end) during use. Suggest IFixit consider finding another resin - perhaps a glass-filled polycarbonate - out of which to construct the opening tools. Since opening any electronic device requires care and some acumen concerning electrical properties, perhaps considering a metal material of construction should not be dismissed out-of-hand. I, for one, found a "straight-pin" to be of enormous help during the repair process.

All in all, the repair went relatively smoothly, and IFixit's web-site provided valuable resources to that end.

My Problem

I was cleaning the dust out from the cover of my iPod touch and used the assembly guide to remove my previous front panel. Unfortunately, I didn't go through all the proper steps and failed to remove the touch screen ribbon cable. I guess i under-estimated the true fagility of that cable and it ripped quite easily.

My Fix

Repair went great other than reconnecting the new cable was a bit of a pain. Use some plastic tweezers if you can find them. Otherwise, matching up the ports were very difficult.

My Advice

When cleaning, don't skip tests. If installing a new front panel, use tweezers on the touch screen cable attachment

My Problem

Shattered front panel.

My Fix

My experience was mildly painful I think only because the panel was already cracked. When prying at it, it came off in pieces. The plastic that engages the clips stayed in the unit while the rest broke off. Had to resort to a jewelers flat head. The tips of the plastic tools broke off kind of easy. Installing the new panel was painless and worked as designed. The ribbon cable needed to be gently bent over to match the old panel. The biggest pain was hitting the power button during removal. I removed and installed with the power on. The unit would not power on after install, had to plug it into charger and wait a few minutes, herd a beep and it was good to go.

My Advice

As I saw in another post, but forgot, taping the broken panel is Google practice.

Taball727's Story Photo #119999
Taball727's Story Photo #120000

My Problem

My son decided to take his Ipod touch dancing on the neighbors driveway and cracked the screen up a good one.

My Fix

The repair wasn't as easy as the Ifixit video,which it had been.

Took turns between 3 pairs of steady hands to get the glass separated with the opening tools,then had to get the connection delicately disconnected,the demo video didn't show how to replace connection so that took a while to get it

connected,once that was done,replaced new glass we all let out a sigh of relief and hoped it would turn on...

My Advice

I would've put tape over the broken pieces of the glass before removing it, we had lil bits of glass on the table as we separated the glass and be extra careful to not get smudges or prints on the under side of glass,we werent as careful and theres smudges on underside.