Student-Contributed Wiki

Student-Contributed Wiki

An awesome student from our education program made this wiki. It is not managed by iFixit staff.

Mouse Stops Responding ¶ 

The mouse stops functioning while in operation, with the on-screen cursor no longer moving and actions such as right-clicking fails to bring up the shortcuts menu.

Drives Out of Sync ¶ 

Computers may sometimes skip an update cycle with your mouse or hardware drivers because another program was briefly given priority, causing a slight desynchronization between the mouse and the computer. The mouse is still working and sending commands to the computer, but the computer can no longer properly read the commands It would be like trying to read this guide with all the spaces randomly placed around and in the middle of words. To fix this, you just need to reset the communication between both the computer and the mouse by reseting the mouse and its connection. You can do this while the mouse in on in either wired or wireless mode, by holding down the left mouse button, the right mouse button, and the scroll wheel (middle mouse button) at the same time, for 5 seconds to reset the mouse.

In the future, you may want to update the mouse's driver and firmware by using the dedicated program Razer Synapse if you do not already have it installed. This program can not only help minimize these issues by giving your drivers greater priority, but can provide the most up to date drivers specially made for your Naga mouse to get the best performance out of your device.

Lastly, you may want to make sure that your USB ports are not set to turn off automatically, as USB is how the mouse communicates with the computer both in wired and wireless mode. You can do so by following this video guide.

Mouse Cursor Stops or Partially Moving ¶ 

Mouse cursor stops moving, moves on only a single axis, or stutters while moving, but, right clicking still works.

Blocked Sensor ¶ 

The Naga mouse tracks mouse movement by using an inferred laser-based optical sensor on the bottom, which allows the mouse to watch the surface moving below it. You can find the sensor by identifying the small peephole on the underside of the mouse. Do not look into the hole! Inferred light is invisible to human eyes, you should unplug or switch your mouse off when you are looking at the underside of the mouse. This hole and the sensor hidden on the other side can be obstructed by small crumbs caught in the peephole and bits of lint. Inspect the hole for any particles, giving it a puff of air with a straw to try and clear the hole. If you don't see anything, consider that even small hairs on the outside not covering the holes, but caught on the Teflon ring that surrounds the sensor, is all it takes to mess with the sensor. Take a toothpick and go around the edge of these rings to remove these hairs and bits of lint, this way they won't roll under the sensor and obstruct its view. If you spot something stuck to the yellow/amber lens hidden behind the peephole, do not stick anything in the whole. Open up the device and remove the circuit board so you can clean the sensor on the underside using a cotton swab and isopropyl alcohol. Give it 15 minutes to dry before turning the mouse back on.

Slow Computer ¶ 

If your computer is slow, it could cause visual stutters in performance such as a slow or jumping mouse cursor, typed text takes a moment before it's displayed on screen, or videos may not run smoothly. Speed up your computer by closing unneeded programs, closing unneeded background programs using Task Manager, and investigate what startup programs and services you can deactivate by following this guide.

Poor Work Surface ¶ 

The sensor may be having a hard time seeing the work surface. Try using your mouse on another surface, avoiding Red, Blue, or Black surfaces or mousepads, as sometimes these colors may not reflect enough inferred light back into the optical sensor to allow it to see the surface. Surfaces do not need to be a solid single color. Check to make sure the area is clean, wipe away crumbs and clean sticky messes with a tightly wadded paper towel and isopropyl alcohol. You can improve the performance of your mouse by calibrating it for your work surface. Download the Razer Synapse program if you do not already have it installed, and navigate to the “CALIBRATION” tab for your product.

Unclean Circuit Board ¶ 

Some users have reported opening up their device and finding liquids from spills or even oils from the manufacturing process that were left on the circuit board. Clean the circuit board using isopropyl alcohol and a cotton swab. Let the circuit board dry for 15 minutes afterward.

Loose Pins ¶ 

There are times when the mice are sent out with manufacturing defects where one day your mouse can stop working for what seems like no reason. Some users have reported that opening up their mice, they find that the solder joints around the pins connecting the sensor are not solid. Solder looks like little pools of metal around metal pins of devices connecting them to the circuit board. Reconnect the pins by resoldering these connection points.

Mouse Double Clicks ¶ 

Mouse reads every click as a double click.

Mechanical Design Flaw of The Micro Switches ¶ 

The microswitches used for these mice have connections inside of them that sometimes get clogged up or change conductivity. Clean the switch's internal connections by opening the mouse and delivering a few drops of Contact Cleaner (such as Deoxit) or isopropyl alcohol onto the switch, close to the actual moving nub piece. Once applied, use your finger, cotton swab, or toothpick to press down the nub a few times to get the fluids inside and to help clean the contacts. Give the mouse 15 minutes to dry before powering back on.

Mouse Won't Turn On ¶ 

Mouse doesn't light up and the computer doesn't detect the mouse after trying to turn it on.

Dead Battery ¶ 

If the battery is dead, the mouse will not turn on, but it can still be plugged into the computer. Charge the mouse by placing it in its charging dock, or connecting it to the computer. You can use the mouse while it is charging if it is connected with the USB wire.

Charging Dock Not Powered ¶ 

If the charging dock is connected to your computer but not charging your mouse, the USB port the charging dock is connected to can be set to turn off after a while. You can wake up the USB port by unplugging and replugging the charging dock back into the USB port or trying other USB ports. The USB port loses power as part of a power saving feature, which you can disable by following this guide.

Scrolling Not Working ¶ 

Mouse cursor and buttons work, but trying to scroll up and down pages does nothing, or the page scrolls in the wrong direction.

Wheel Sensor Is Clogged ¶ 

With the scroll wheel being the most mechanical part of the mouse, there is a lot that can go wrong with the internal parts. Small hairs and dirt can be cleared out of your mouse by taking a straw and blowing air in the gap between the scroll wheel and the right mouse button where the sensor is located for the scroll wheel.

Sometimes blowing air is not enough to remove whatever is blocking or clogging the sensor. Open up the mouse and remove any hairs you can find with a pair of tweezers.

The sensor itself may need cleaning. Drip Contact Cleaner (such as Deoxit) or isopropyl alcohol onto the sensing device found to the right of the scroll wheel, and give the scroll wheel a few spins back and forth to let the liquids into the sensor to break up the grime. Give your mouse 15 minutes to dry before powering it back on to test.

Unclean Circuit Board ¶ 

Oils left over from production or new spills can get on the circuit board and interfere with the electronics. Clean the circuit board with a cotton swab and isopropyl alcohol. Let your mouse dry for 15 minutes before powering it on to test.

Wornout Sensor ¶ 

After enough use, the sensor itself may wear out. Users can extend the life of their mouse’s scroll wheel by modifying the sensor to work again. Follow along with this video walkthrough to learn how to open up the sensor and bend the detection swiper back into place.

Wireless Mode is Not Working ¶ 

Mouse not detected by the computer.

Drivers Not Installed Yet ¶ 

Drivers are the backbone code that lets different devices work with one another. All computers come with basic drivers, but these drivers may not be compatible with your mouse and may not allow your computer to detect the mouse while in wireless mode. Plug the mouse into the computer with the cable it comes with, allow the computer to detect your mouse and install the proper drivers. If after the installation of the drivers, your mouse still doesn't work, download and install Razer Synapse if you do not already have it installed, and allow it to install the most updated and specially designed drivers for your mouse.

USB Port Powered Off ¶ 

The USB port that your wireless receiver (Charging Dock) connects to can be set to turn off after a while. You can wake up the USB port by unplugging and replugging the charging dock back into the USB port or trying other USB ports. The USB port loses power as part of a power saving feature, which you can disable by following this guide.

Mouse Buttons Stop Working ¶ 

Mouse cursor moves, but the computer or program cannot detect button presses or button pad commands.

Buttons Are Misaligned ¶ 

The buttons of the mouse have small posts that relay the mechanical motion of the button to the switches built inside the mouse. Smashing down on these buttons, dropping the mouse, or just a manufacturing defect can result in either these posts being misaligned with the input nubs of the switches, or the circuit board itself can be misaligned, and the mechanical motion of the button fails to be transferred to the internal switches. Open up your mouse and loosen the screws holding down the circuit board, move the board a little to get it so that the nubs of the switches are directly under the posts leading from the buttons, and tighten the screws back down on the circuit board to hold it firmly in place.

Micro/tactile switches Clogged ¶ 

The microswitches used for these mice have connections inside of them that sometimes get clogged up or change conductivity. Clean the switch's internal connections by opening the mouse and delivering a few drops of Contact Cleaner (such as Deoxit) or isopropyl alcohol onto the switch, close to the actual moving nub piece. Once applied, use your finger, cotton swab, or toothpick to press down the nub a few times to get the fluids inside and to help clean the contacts. Give the mouse 15 minutes to dry before powering back on.

Mouse Is Sensitive ¶ 

Mouse enters max sensitivity while only doing some operations, often only happening in one program and working like normal elsewhere, resetting the mouse or its sensitivity settings does nothing to fix this behavior.

Rare Glitch ¶ 

Your mouse may start sending raw input data to your computer that does not properly reflect your mouse's settings. Download and install Razer Synapse and run the program. Razer Synapse is a program for customizing the settings of your mouse. In Razer Synapse, navigate to the “PERFORMANCE” tag of your product. Check the box to first ENABLE and then DISABLE for independent “X-Y SENSITIVITY,” and then set mouse acceleration to as high as possible and then down to zero acceleration. Return to the problematic program to see if your mouse no longer has a sensitivity issue.

Mouse Buttons Lets Go Too Soon ¶ 

When dragging a file or a selection box, the mouse will let go by itself.

Polling Rate Too High ¶ 

If the poll rate of your mouse is set to Razer’s “Ultra-Polling” of 1000 Hz, your mouse may be sending data to your computer faster than it can process the data. Some USB connections and/or hubs can’t work this fast. Using the Razer Synapse program, navigate to “PERFORMANCE” tag of your mouse. Going down to the bottom option, “POLLING RATE,” click on the options menu and select the 500 Hz option, or whichever lower frequency options you can find.

Mouse Wired Mode Not Working ¶ 

When the mouse works in wireless mode, but not in wired USB mode.

USB Port Powered Off ¶ 

The USB port that you are connected to can be unpowered. You can wake up the USB port by unplugging and replugging the charging dock back into the USB port or trying other USB ports. The USB port loses power as part of a power saving feature, which you can disable by following this guide.

USB Port Provides insuffecient Powered ¶ 

The lights on your mouse can draw more power than your USB hub supports. Try different USB ports on your computer. Avoid using external USB hubs that do not have a dedicated power brick to go along with them. If none of your USB Ports can provide enough power, look into getting a powered USB Hub to connect between your computer and your mouse to provide power and connectivity to your mouse.

Mouse Is Dirty, Damaged, And Getting Old ¶ 

Mouse becomes difficult or unpleasant to operate, either making scraping noises or making your hand sore or sticky after prolonged use.

Mouse is Sticky ¶ 

From either spills or natural collection of grime, your mouse can build up a collection of tacky/sticky residue or films. Simply clean the outside of the mouse with warm water, using a small amount of dish soap if the grime proves to be stubborn. Use isopropyl alcohol and a cotton swab when cleaning the optical sensor and the scroll wheel, turning the scroll wheel as you clean it to get all parts of the wheel. Make sure the device is powered off when you do this, and allow the mouse 15 minutes to dry before powering the mouse back on.

Scroll Wheel is Stuck ¶ 

Inspect for anything jammed between the scroll wheel and the edges around the scroll wheel. If nothing is found, you may have to open up the mouse, and remove any hair wrapped around the axis. Clean the axis with isopropyl alcohol to remove old grease, you may want to apply new grease, but keep the grease away from the sensor located on the right side of the scroll wheel.

Lint Trapped on Teflon Pads ¶ 

Teflon pads are the feet of your mouse and are made to make your mouse gently glide over the work surface, the edges of the cut Teflon pads can expose glue that dirt and lint can get stuck on. Dirt and lint caught under the Teflon pads and will mess with pad's ability properly glide. Clean the edges of the pad with a toothpick, and give the workspace a swipe to clean it of crumbs and lint.

Damaged Teflon Pad Corners ¶ 

Inspect the black Teflon pads beneath for bent, folded, or torn corners. First, try bending them back in place. Tacking them back down with glue may help. If this doesn't work, try trimming off any protrusions using an Exacto Knife near the base of where the fold starts. Cut at a sideways slanted angle with the point of the blade aimed away from the center of the pad and away from yourself.

Grime Buildup Under Teflon Pads ¶ 

An invisible film of what most believe is skin and oil may build up on the Teflon pads. Checking for grime by scraping the pads with your nail or toothpick. Using isopropyl alcohol and a lint-free rag, clean the pads in small circular motions. Clean around the edges of the pads to remove hair and grime with a toothpick.

Damaged Teflon Pads Faces ¶ 

Pads may be scratched and these scratches can leave small bits of torn Teflon around the edges of these scratches called burrs. These burrs can act as small hooks that can catch things, or the burrs themselves can get caught under the Teflon pads and impair the pad's functionality. Cleaning the pads first, as described in the paragraph above may be a good first step. After cleaning, you may find even more scratches than before. To repair these scratches, removing the burrs is all it takes. Use a clean sheet of printer paper and move the mouse in a figure 8 motion on the paper while holding it down on the device with extra force. Do this for about 2 to 5 minutes to polish the pads back to a smooth finish. It is ok for there to still be deep cuts as long as no bits of Teflon is still hanging off the edges of the scratch. Swap out the paper for a clean piece if you start to see dark streaks from grime or black particles. These black particles are the burrs you are trying to remove, you want to get rid these burrs from the paper you are using before running your mouse back over these hazardous things. Moving the mouse over these burrs can cause further scratching of your pads.

Can't Customize The Mouse ¶ 

The Default Windows Mouse Sensitivity options are too limited, and you can't find how to program the buttons or lights.

Missing Software ¶ 

To have the greatest amount of control of your device, you need to download and install Razer’s dedicated Razer Synapse program. Razer Synapse automatically updates your mouse's drivers to the latest revision, allows users to have fine control over their mouse sensitivity option, reprogram 18 of the 19 available buttons, and personalize their lighting options.

2 Comments

what to do if Wireless is Working and Wired Mode is Not Working ?

mike laluan - Reply

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5mqOFYtU...

This video fixes the drag and holding issue where it will let go of holding left or right click and it will let go by itself

Mitchell Ward - Reply

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