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This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your iPod Shuffle 4th Generation, use our service manual.

  1. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown, iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 1, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown, iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 1, image 2 of 2
    • Apple's latest incarnation of the Shuffle bears little resemblance to its immediate predecessor.

    • Although the Shuffle features "new, smaller packaging," it doesn't feature a similarly resized shipping box. Apple could have shipped 30 iPod Shuffles in this box. Literally.

    • Its Apple model number is A1373, updated from the previous Shuffle's A1271 designation.

  2. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 2, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 2, image 2 of 2
    • The 4th Gen Shuffle is priced at a paltry $49.99! The original iPod shuffle cost $99, and had only 512 MB of storage.

    • There's a button just for VoiceOver: push once for artist and song, twice for battery status, and hold for playlist menu.

    • Apple admitted that people actually like buttons and brought them back for this generation.

    • Pshhh! Those of us with 3rd Gen Shuffles just printed out this convenient chart and carried it around for reference.

  3. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 3, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 3, image 2 of 2
    • Here's the full lineup.

    • There seems to be pattern here: skinny, fat, skinny, fat. It seems like Apple can't decide what shape they like best.

    • iPod Shuffle 4th Generation:

    • Height: 1.14"

    • Width: 1.24"

    • Depth: 0.34"

    • Weight: 0.44 oz.

    • A bank was robbed last week in Ba Sing Se. Witnesses were given this lineup to identify the perpetrator.

  4. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 4, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 4, image 2 of 2
    • Although this step makes it look super-simple to open the Shuffle, it's not. It took us a good half hour of prying and heat-gunning to open the little guy.

    • Pro tip: Aluminum gets hot when it's heated!

  5. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 5, image 1 of 1
    • The exposed internals.

    • The logic board is stuffed alongside the battery in the outer case.

    • Notice the glue residue along the edges of the opening.

    • Apple press-fit and glued the back clip onto the body. No wonder it was such a doozy to open!

  6. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 6, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 6, image 2 of 2
    Tool used on this step:
    Tweezers
    $4.99
    Buy
    • Even the seemingly simple task of disconnecting the control pad ribbon cable turns out to be quite a chore when the connector is 1/8" wide.

    • We have a feeling that as technology advances, we'll need smaller and smaller tools to take devices apart. You won't be able to see our hands in pictures, just little pointy tweezers.

    • We already have a microscope ready and waiting in the back room for when that time comes -- but we're not there quite yet (thankfully).

  7. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 7, image 1 of 3 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 7, image 2 of 3 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 7, image 3 of 3
    • Our huge #00 screwdriver makes short work of the logic board screw.

    • A plastic opening tool is needed to lift the battery off the light adhesive holding it to the case.

    • After the battery is out, a small plastic logic board retainer must be removed with none other than a dental pick.

  8. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 8, image 1 of 1
    • We remove the logic board and battery together from the iPod, because Apple once again chose to solder the battery to the logic board.

    • The loss of user-serviceability is the price we pay for small, sleek design.

  9. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 9, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 9, image 2 of 2
    • Removing the last four screws in the iPod Shuffle, which secure the control pad to the front of the iPod.

    • The button and control pads pop out together with a gentle push.

  10. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 10, image 1 of 1
    • The control pad comes out of the front case without any additional trouble.

  11. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 11, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 11, image 2 of 2
    • With a listed capacity of .19 Whr, this small 3.7V lithium-ion battery pumps out 15 hours of audio playback.

    • To calculate the capacity in amp-hours, we know P(power) = I(amps)*V(volts), so I = P/V. That yields a capacity of about .051 amp-hours, or 51 mAh. To say the least, that's diminutive in the world of batteries.

    • It's remarkable how long a battery lasts when it doesn't have to power a backlight.

  12. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 12, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 12, image 2 of 2
    • APPLE 338S0860 C0AN1021 TWN

    • 339S0128 / K9GA608U0E BC80 / FDEF26QV 1025 / 8443 ARM / N2N63MQ1 1031

    • Unsurprisingly, the date codes on this package indicate die manufacture dates in late June (1025) and early August 2010 (1031).

    • "K9GA6" indicates Samsung 16Gb flash, unlike the Nano and touch which use Toshiba flash.

  13. iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 13, image 1 of 2 iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Teardown: step 13, image 2 of 2
    • iPod Shuffle 4th Generation Repairability: 2 out of 10 (10 is easiest to repair)

    • Good: The control pad is attached to the logic board via a connector, allowing it to be easily separated.

    • Good: The lack of a screen eliminates a large weak point of other devices, making the Shuffle more resilient to falls. Just don't flush it down the toilet.

    • Bad: You essentially have to break it to open it.

    • Bad: The battery is soldered to the logic board, making replacement that much more difficult.

    • Bad: Apple keeps shrinking connectors. These super-small cable connectors are increasingly difficult to open without breaking them.

6 Comments

That guy stratched PCB, broke edge of a chip and totally wrench one capatitor. Seen on step 12. Thanks for HQ photos. I wish more patience to author, next time...

quido speedy - Reply

Thank you very much. The guide is very good and I was able to change the battery of my ipod shuffle. It is working again.

Helena Matias - Reply

Hey,

do you mind sharing where you got your battery .. and how much it cost .. ? I’m curious to see how stuff changed in 7 years.

Mine’s still doing ok (bought 2011, used extremely often), but … it’s showing its age.

Thanks ✌️

Darie H -

Btw, u don't need a spludge to open up the outer casing for step 4.

U just wedge the clip with something thin, and it creates a weak point on the casing so u get another person with a thin wedge to use that weak point to open it up.

Mark Hong - Reply

How difficult is it to play any streaming media passing through ipod shuffle or ipod nano hardware

Ankit Anurag - Reply

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