Tools Featured in this Teardown

Introduction

It got too dangerous. Shots were fired. Eyes were almost lost. It was time to downgrade.

One of our iFixit programmers was notorious for using his Nerf WMD randomly on co-workers, with no forewarning nor regard for their safety. On one of these occasions, said co-worker shot me in the eye with one of the darts. Thankfully I was wearing my glasses, and a full-on beatdown was avoided.

In retaliation I brought my never-used soft air handgun from home. We had a couple of laughs, a couple of stings, but it was largely fine up until one day, when I was aiming for the co-worker's arm and shot him in the neck instead.

I was quite disappointed by the lack of accuracy, and thought it hypocritical of me to compromise others' safety, when my own was so crucial to me. So I authorized a purchase of up to TEN DOLLARS with The Wife, and set out to find the best Nerf gun available.

This is it: The Nerf N-Strike Maverick.

Needless to say, the gun looks goofy and child-like in its original paint scheme. We all know that yellow is the color of cowards, so I decided to paint my new office weapon. I was also curious as to what was inside, and lazy (I wanted to paint both sides at the same time), so I torn'd this sucker down and took some pictures!

Enjoy!

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your Nerf N-Strike Maverick, use our service manual.

Image 1/1: Reminds me of a gun from the Fifth Element.
  • The Redeemer. Looks badass with its rotating barrel, but it's going to get a whole lot more badasserer quite soon...

  • Reminds me of a gun from the Fifth Element.

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Image 1/1: Remove all ten Phillips screws.
  • First thing's first: let's remove some screws. All screws are conveniently Phillips, and all can be removed with a #0 or #00 size screwdriver.

  • Remove all ten Phillips screws.

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Image 1/3: The cocking mechanism's quite simple.  A metal lever pulls back on the air plunger and compresses the large spring. Another small spring returns the slider back into its original position once it's done doing the dirty business..
  • Another Phillips screw hides beneath the cocking mechanism thing. Remove that one as well.

  • The cocking mechanism's quite simple. A metal lever pulls back on the air plunger and compresses the large spring. Another small spring returns the slider back into its original position once it's done doing the dirty business..

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Image 1/2: Visible in the top left corner is the large spring and air plunger.
  • And just like that, the gun comes apart.

  • Visible in the top left corner is the large spring and air plunger.

  • I later opened the gun again and put a folded piece of paper in this area. It gave the gun a bit more "punch" when sending darts on their merry way.

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Image 1/1:
  • Gun tip. I foresee it being black in the future.

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Image 1/2: The barrel comes out next.
  • First comes out the air plunger. It lifts right up.

  • The barrel comes out next.

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Image 1/2:
  • The trigger is held in place by a sole Phillips screw. It also has a small spring for that authentic handgun "springy" feeling...

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Image 1/3: The fancy rotator for the barrel is next. I assume that were the gun to break, this would be the part that fails. It's the most complex part of the gun.
  • The trigger's spring also attaches via a Phillips screw. A couple of twists with the screwdriver and it comes right out.

  • The fancy rotator for the barrel is next. I assume that were the gun to break, this would be the part that fails. It's the most complex part of the gun.

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Image 1/1: I didn't bother to take the barrel apart. I didn't feel ''that'' adventurous.
  • Looking down the gun's business end.

  • I didn't bother to take the barrel apart. I didn't feel that adventurous.

The barrel assembly is not as difficult as it looks. There are a few simple modifications that can be done very inexpensively inside to create a noticeable increase in "bang for your buck".

KurtW - Reply

Image 1/1: It's so easy to assemble, a child could do it. Maybe Nerf's motto is "From our kids to your kids"?
  • Here it is -- the whole gun taken apart.

  • It's so easy to assemble, a child could do it. Maybe Nerf's motto is "From our kids to your kids"?

  • I sincerely hope Nerf products are manufactured in countries that have strict child labor laws. I in no way, shape, or form condone child labor.

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Image 1/2: I took the gun to work and shot these pictures under a better lighting/camera setup... A much better lighting/camera setup.
  • The finished product.

  • I took the gun to work and shot these pictures under a better lighting/camera setup... A much better lighting/camera setup.

  • For those who like details: pic1 and pic2.

I am very afraid.

David Patierno - Reply

Quote from David Patierno:

I am very afraid.

taking apart the barrel is where the fun starts. pry off the orange cylinder on either end, remove 3 screws from the black side of the barrel and it's open. take out the 6 springs and the short plastic pieces. set aside. take the long plastic pieces and trim the stems flush with the convex surface. take the springs, short plastic pieces, and the stems and throw them at somebody. put it all back together making sure the former stemmed pieces are tight and you now have the most awesome nerf gun ever!

check youtube, couple of videos there...

cheers!

davethetoyotaguy - Reply

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