Introduction

Apple announced a trio of new laptops, and boy are they keeping our teardown table busy. We started with the entry-level MacBook Pro "Escape Edition," and today we've reached the top of the line. With twice the fans, over a million more pixels, and the new Touch Bar that attempts to replace our tried-and-true function keys, it can only mean one thing: it's time to tear down the new 15" MacBook Pro with Touch Bar.

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This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your MacBook Pro 15" Touch Bar Late 2016, use our service manual.

Image 1/2: 15.4" LED-backlit Retina display with 2880 × 1800 resolution (220 dpi), P3 color gamut Image 2/2: 2.6 GHz Skylake quad-core Intel Core i7 (Turbo Boost up to 3.5 GHz) with integrated Radeon Pro 450 with 2GB of GDDR5 memory
  • The MacBook Pro 15" packs a million pixels over the 13-inch models we've already torn down. Here's a preview of the tech we're expecting to find inside today:

    • 15.4" LED-backlit Retina display with 2880 × 1800 resolution (220 dpi), P3 color gamut

    • 2.6 GHz Skylake quad-core Intel Core i7 (Turbo Boost up to 3.5 GHz) with integrated Radeon Pro 450 with 2GB of GDDR5 memory

    • 16 GB of 2133 MHz LPDDR3 onboard memory

    • 256 GB PCIe-based onboard SSD (Configurable to 512 GB, 1 TB, or 2 TB SSD)

    • Four Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C) ports supporting charging, DisplayPort, Thunderbolt, USB 3.1 Gen 2

    • Touch Bar with integrated Touch ID sensor

    • Force Touch trackpad

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Image 1/3: The MacBook Pro 15" identifies as model '''A1707''', which fits nicely between the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Touch+Bar+Teardown/73480#s147815|A1706|new_window=true] and [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Function+Keys+Late+2016+Teardown/72415#s144721|A1708|new_window=true] from our previous two teardowns. Image 2/3: In case you forgot, this laptop was ''Designed by Apple in California'' and ''Assembled in China''. Image 3/3: Just like the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+15-Inch+Retina+Display+Mid+2012+Teardown/9462#s36188|previous MBP line|new_window=true], there are long air intake vents under the left and right sides. If this computer is anything like its [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Touch+Bar+Teardown/73480#s148019|little brother|new_window=true], these vents should serve double-duty as speaker outlets.
  • Stack them if you have them. Here we have the MacBook Pro 13" layered on top of today's main attraction, the MacBook Pro 15"—and apart from the size difference, they appear near identical. We're itching to see how similar (or not) they are inside.

  • The MacBook Pro 15" identifies as model A1707, which fits nicely between the A1706 and A1708 from our previous two teardowns.

  • In case you forgot, this laptop was Designed by Apple in California and Assembled in China.

  • Just like the previous MBP line, there are long air intake vents under the left and right sides. If this computer is anything like its little brother, these vents should serve double-duty as speaker outlets.

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Image 1/3: On initial inspection, the 15" MBP looks ... like a scaled up version of the 13" model. We do notice a difference in the battery layout, but overall it's like looking at [http://screencrush.com/442/files/2014/05/Twins.jpg?w=720&cdnnode=1|twins|new_window=true]. Image 2/3: Look who we ran into again! The connector to [https://goo.gl/rqTsqp|nowhere|new_window=true]. Image 3/3: [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Touch+Bar+Teardown/73480#comment-272290|Scuttlebutt|new_window=true] in the comments on our last teardown is that Apple may have included this to access the soldered-in SSD for data recovery.
  • Houston, we have lift-off! This teardown has achieved first stage separation.

  • On initial inspection, the 15" MBP looks ... like a scaled up version of the 13" model. We do notice a difference in the battery layout, but overall it's like looking at twins.

  • Look who we ran into again! The connector to nowhere.

    • Scuttlebutt in the comments on our last teardown is that Apple may have included this to access the soldered-in SSD for data recovery.

    • We'd still rather see a removable/upgradeable SSD, particularly in a machine targeted at pros—but this way if your logic board bites the dust, there might at least be a chance of recovering your data with Apple's help. Keep making those backups though.

The "connector to nowhere" is probably the PCIe lanes for the SSD. The cover has a PCB that joins the lanes.

In theory you should be able to use a adapter and plug it into a standard x4 PCIe slot (or maybe one that converts it to Thunderbolt or USB3?).

Jason Simonelli - Reply

There's an adapter/kit out there that exists from Apple whose purpose is just that.

Zaphod - Reply

Image 1/3: And this one is a monster, nearly holding its own beside an iPad mini 2. Image 2/3: Now we know which trackpad in the family has been [https://d3nevzfk7ii3be.cloudfront.net/igi/msCacyY6Xjv6NoTA.huge|taking its vitamins|new_window=true]. Image 3/3: We're not surprised to find the same ICs on this trackpad as we did in both 13" MBPs. However, with the increased size, Apple had to add a second touch controller to digitize all that extra trackpad:
  • Removing the trackpad requires as little effort as it did with other two 2016 MBP models—we simply spin out thirteen T5 screws and the trackpad is ours.

  • And this one is a monster, nearly holding its own beside an iPad mini 2.

  • We're not surprised to find the same ICs on this trackpad as we did in both 13" MBPs. However, with the increased size, Apple had to add a second touch controller to digitize all that extra trackpad:

    • STMicroelectronics STM32F103VB ARM Cortex-M3 MCU

    • Broadcom BCM5976C1KUFBG Touch Controller x2

    • Maxim Integrated MAX11291ENX 24-Bit, 6-Channel Delta-Sigma ADC

Interesting that we have two touch controllers here, while the slightly larger Magic Trackpad 2 only has one of the same kind.

Hadi Skeini - Reply

What was the actually size compared to the 13" trackpad. We see a visual but no real dimensions for relativity.

Nate - Reply

Image 1/2: Pulling off the new-and-improved heat sink (again, screwed through the back of the logic board), exposes the CPU and GPU. Image 2/2: Pulling off the new-and-improved heat sink (again, screwed through the back of the logic board), exposes the CPU and GPU.
  • Moving right along, it's time to get this logic board out. It's a little wider in the middle, but shares the same mustachioed symmetry of its smaller sibling.

  • Pulling off the new-and-improved heat sink (again, screwed through the back of the logic board), exposes the CPU and GPU.

这一代自己换硅脂清灰看来要把整个主板拆下来了,看图散热风扇壳的部分边角居然是压在主板下面,而且cpu和gpu热管的四颗螺丝居然也是从主板背面上紧的,WTF……

Davis - Reply

Image 1/2: Intel [http://ark.intel.com/products/88967/Intel-Core-i7-6700HQ-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_50-GHz#@specifications|Core i7-6700HQ|new_window=true] 2.6 GHz (up to 3.5 GHz) quad-core processor Image 2/2: Micron [https://www.micron.com/parts/dram/mobile-ddr3-sdram/mt52l1g32d4pg-107-wt?pc=%7B55AE905C-E597-4C5F-9CE7-9A9C11244649%7D|MT52L1G32D4PG-093|new_window=true] 4 GB LPDDR3 (four chips for 16 GB total)
  • Time to take a gander at this octopus lobo and see what makes it the leader of the pack. Highlights include:

    • Intel Core i7-6700HQ 2.6 GHz (up to 3.5 GHz) quad-core processor

    • Micron MT52L1G32D4PG-093 4 GB LPDDR3 (four chips for 16 GB total)

    • AMD Radeon Pro 450

    • Elpida (Micron) EDW4032BABG-70-F 512 MB GDDR5 RAM (four chips for 2 GB total)

    • Intel JHL 6540 Thunderbolt 3 controller (one for each set of USB-C ports)

    • Intel SR2NH (likely a platform controller hub)

    • Texas Instruments CD3215C00 69AV2TW (labeled as Apple's T1 chip in their keynote)

intel JHL6540 supports two ports.

JJ Wu - Reply

Each side has two USB-C ports so the need to have two USB-C (Thunderbolt-3) controllers makes sense. What is odd is the fact one set of ports (side) is slower than the other.

Dan - Reply

Huh? I thought only the touch bar 13" model had slower ports.

Dan Parsons -

One of the controllers on the 13-inch model with four Thunderbolt 3 ports only has a PCIe 3.0 x2 connection to the PCH. The ports operate at full speed (40 Gbit/s), can transport two DP 1.2 links, provide 10 GbE Thunderbolt networking, and support native Thunderbolt, DP, and USB 3.1 Gen 2 (10 Gb/s) signaling. There are no differences in their capabilities aside from the reduced PCIe bandwidth, which ends up being equivalent to that of Thunderbolt 2. Skylake-U chips lack PEG lanes for discrete GPUs, and the PCH only has connections for up to 12 PCIe 3.0 lanes. 4 went to the SSD, 1 to the Wi-Fi controller, 4 to the left-hand Thunderbolt 3 controller, 2 to the right-hand Thunderbolt 3 controller and the last one got orphaned. The link between the CPU and PCH in those systems is only equivalent to PCI 3.0 x4 though, so it could be saturated by the SSD alone.

repoman27 -

Image 1/3: Texas Instruments CD3215C00 69AV2TW Image 2/3: We can't ID this guy, but it's in the same spot that Apple claim their T1 chip that powers the Touch Bar is. Image 3/3: That's kind of a surprise, considering there's three similar ICs peppered over the rest of this logic board, and a pair of them in the [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Function+Keys+Late+2016+Teardown/72415#s144840|Function Keys model|new_window=true].
  • Here's a close up of that T1, er, TI chip?

    • Texas Instruments CD3215C00 69AV2TW

  • We can't ID this guy, but it's in the same spot that Apple claim their T1 chip that powers the Touch Bar is.

    • That's kind of a surprise, considering there's three similar ICs peppered over the rest of this logic board, and a pair of them in the Function Keys model.

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Image 1/1: Samsung [https://memorylink.samsung.com/ecomobile/mem/ecomobile/product/productDetail.do?topMenu=A&subMenu=tablets&appNo=tablets&appLabel=Tablets&partNo=K4E4E324ED-EGCF&partSetNo=LPDDR3|K4E4E32|new_window=true] 512 MB LPDDR3 DRAM, likely with a [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Function+Keys+Late+2016+Teardown/72415#s144820|custom Apple-made SSD controller|new_window=true] layered beneath
  • Other chips jockeying for position on this side of the board:

It's a Samsung Polaris controller underneath the PoP DRAM, same as used in the Samsung SM961 and 960 Pro. The new 15-inch MBPs all appear to come with what is essentially a Samsung 960 Pro on board.

repoman27 - Reply

It should not be SAMSUNG Polaris SSD controller. It should be Apple proprietary SSD controller.

JJ Wu -

how abt the full marking of NAND flash? any more details...

Wade Guo - Reply

Image 1/2: Samsung K9PHGY8 flash storage (two more 64 GB chips for 128 GB on this side and 256 GB total) Image 2/2: Texas Instruments CD32 15C00 69C2HQW
  • Taking a look at the flip-side of the logic board, we find:

    • Samsung K9PHGY8 flash storage (two more 64 GB chips for 128 GB on this side and 256 GB total)

    • Texas Instruments CD32 15C00 69C2HQW

    • WinBond SpiFlash 25Q64FVIQ 64 Mb serial flash memory

    • Texas Instruments TPS51980A synchronous buck controller

    • Intersil 95828 HRTZ X630MSW

    • Intersil 6277A HRZ W630DWW

    • Apple APL1023 343S00137 (the same chip appeared in our teardown of the MBP 13" Touch Bar, and is very likely the T1 controller that runs the Touch Bar)

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Image 1/1: Murata/Apple 339S00056 Wi-Fi Module
  • And the IC party continues:

    • Murata/Apple 339S00056 Wi-Fi Module

    • Apple 338S00193-A1 16348HIP

    • Texas Instruments TMP513A PMIC

    • S2FPS04X01 A1632

    • 969A0 TI67J P6EH

    • 9239HI B632E7

Any idea if the 339S00056 wireless card has 3x3 MIMO? The 13" without touchbar they went with a 2x2 chip which means slower max wifi throughput. Does this 15" system stick with three antennas?

Josh Glazebrook - Reply

+1

Curious what support this client has, .11ac wave 2? MU-MIMO? DBDC?

jpadden - Reply

I have same questions, I can't find anything on this chip. Is it 3x3 MUMIMO? Mine hasn't arrived in mail yet to check.

matthewcoo - Reply

Image 1/3: And they come out hassle-free. No glue on this puppy! Image 2/3: On the outside that is. Opening up this fan (right) takes some seriously aggressive prying against clips and adhesive compared to the screw-centric construction we saw in the 13" models (left). Image 3/3: This fan is also sporting completely different blades from the ones we  previously encountered.
  • Anxious to get a peek at the third take on Apple's reengineered thermal architecture, we free the fans from the four T3 screws securing them to the rear case.

    • And they come out hassle-free. No glue on this puppy!

  • On the outside that is. Opening up this fan (right) takes some seriously aggressive prying against clips and adhesive compared to the screw-centric construction we saw in the 13" models (left).

  • This fan is also sporting completely different blades from the ones we previously encountered.

    • And for those of you keeping score, they're marginally larger than their counterparts from the 13" model, measuring in at 46.6 mm compared to 42.3 mm.

Besides larger than the 13" model, they also happen to be two different sizes, as we can see. Any reason for that?

Sander Schaeffer - Reply

Maybe it's as simple as those are what fit into the holes?

Lex - Reply

Maybe so that they hum at different frequencies, making them less unpleasant to hear.

Haley Pearse - Reply

Image 1/3: Does that make us lazy? Maybe... But we were still able to determine that this six cell battery offers a total of 11.40 V, and has a power rating of 76.0 Wh. Image 2/3: This 15" MacBook Pro has a similar speaker grille when compared to its smaller [https://www.ifixit.com/Teardown/MacBook+Pro+13-Inch+Touch+Bar+Teardown/73480#s148011|13" counterpart|new_window=true]. Most of the grille doesn't include full through-holes, prompting us to question ''why the dimples, Apple''? Image 3/3: Survey says: weight savers so it goes faster when you put wheels on it.
  • After recently struggling to free the strongly adhered battery in the 13" MacBook Pro with Touch Bar, we decided to let this battery remain glued in its home.

    • Does that make us lazy? Maybe... But we were still able to determine that this six cell battery offers a total of 11.40 V, and has a power rating of 76.0 Wh.

  • This 15" MacBook Pro has a similar speaker grille when compared to its smaller 13" counterpart. Most of the grille doesn't include full through-holes, prompting us to question why the dimples, Apple?

    • Survey says: weight savers so it goes faster when you put wheels on it.

"... Most of the grille doesn't include full through-holes, prompting us to question why the dimples, Apple? ..."

Try to inform you what the BASS REFLEX is ... and you'll find the answer.

The air mover "behind" the membranes for the creation of the sound is as important as the moving air "before" to the membranes.

 A simple picture may be enough to understand what "might be superfluous" that the grid holes are in front of the speaker membranes:

http://www.claudionegro.com/projects/spe...

http://www.ciaocrossclub.it/root/discore...

Henry - Reply

Interesting theory, but I don't think it applies here. Look at the middle picture in the teardown. The speaker assembly is glued directly to the dimpled metal part (the dimples are on the other side you can't see). So it's highly unlikely that those dimples are there to improve the vibration characteristics. The design seems to intentionally prevent bass reflex. To match the other pictures you provided, this would be a speaker attached to a solid block with no airflow around the speaker. Not saying that this is a bad design; just that the physics of an open speaker enclosure don't seem to apply.

Kirke - Reply

I do not have a MBP 2016, so I can not dismount, but the image I see a grid behind the speaker placement ... but mostly I read reviews that give the acoustics of these models as "better" and not " worst "of the past and those directly comparable as encumbrances.

(I apologize for English Google ...)

Henry - Reply

The sound coming out of the new MacBook Pro 15 inch is quite a bit better than any laptop that I've ever owned. The dimpling on either side of the keyboard maybe cosmetic but so are many things found on cars, stereos or even high-end speakers like cherry veneer.

kaztec - Reply

more surface area on the outside of the aluminum hull means more heat dissipation. might not make the most sense as a new feature but since it was already there why change it?

liorgalanti - Reply

Image 1/2: After once again accidentally separating the digitizer from the OLED panel, we turn our tools to the LED display. Image 2/2: Two teardown engineers, an opening pick, X-Acto knife, isopropyl alcohol, a heat gun, and an iOpener all came to this OLED teardown party, but Apple's adhesive was ''still'' too much for our glue separation squad.
  • Touch Bar: Take 2.

  • After once again accidentally separating the digitizer from the OLED panel, we turn our tools to the LED display.

  • Two teardown engineers, an opening pick, X-Acto knife, isopropyl alcohol, a heat gun, and an iOpener all came to this OLED teardown party, but Apple's adhesive was still too much for our glue separation squad.

  • Thwarted by the monstrous amount of adhesive holding the OLED panel in place, we resign to flecking away shards of glass and reminiscing.

Solvents next time?

Collin Reisdorf - Reply

You know... If you take a Touch Bar from one Macbook Pro and put it on another Macbook Pro, it probably shouldn't work if Apple did its job correctly. It's basically a Trusted Platform Module. I think that's why it is called a T1 chip. Does the Macbook Pro even boot without the Touch Bar?

applecranberry - Reply

What are the exact dimensions of the touch bar screen part? (width x height)

cameronehrlich - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Layout for the win!

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Final Thoughts
  • The trackpad is easy to access and straightforward to replace.
  • Use of proprietary pentalobe screws makes servicing and repair unnecessarily difficult.
  • The entire battery assembly is strongly glued into the case, complicating replacement.
  • The processor, RAM, and flash memory are soldered to the logic board.
  • The Touch Bar adds a second, difficult-to-replace screen to damage.
  • The Touch ID sensor doubles as the power switch, and is paired with the T1 chip on the logic board. Fixing a broken power switch may require help from Apple, or a new logic board.
Repairability Score
1
Repairability 1 out of 10
(10 is easiest to repair)

83 Comments

looks like space fro 32GB ram and slightly bigger battery next year. expecting it.

Kim Zhou - Reply

Apple calls this a "pro" laptop? What a joke!

askudra - Reply

Why is it NOT a "pro" laptop?

Eric -

U are a joke lol

Yourmom Isfat -

A horse walks into a bar, and the bartender asks, "Why the long face?"

Now THAT is a joke.

Jake Rando -

Permanently soldered on RAM, SSD drive, limited to 16 GB RAM, lacks ports that are in still in common use, gimmicky touch bar, no function keys, crappy keyboard, everything glued together, nothing repairable, and they call this a professional laptop! Nope, just an overpriced, disposable, anorexic, consumer laptop that's a bit faster than the rest of their laptop line. This is not what us professionals want. I'm sticking with my 17" MacBook Pro.

askudra -

because its built like a disposable device such as a phone. Soldering the SSD is going to far. M.2 NVME could have been used, and it would have been much cheaper on the bill of materials.

Jason Elmore -

Solid State devices like DRAM and FLASH memory are all very reliable, soldering them to the circuit-board to save space by eliminating a connector makes perfect sense. As for the RAM limit, I'm a pro Software Developer and can work fine with only an 8GB Dual-Core MacBook Pro. I have to wait a bit longer for full builds, but that's not the biggest part of my job. And finally, how many Windows PC laptops are there with FOUR Thunderbolt 3 ports? This laptop is more Pro than any other.

Eric -

The very things that you object to are exactly what will make this machine phenomenally reliable.

henry3dogg -

@Eric: FWIW, my work early-2013 MBPro Retina a few months ago suddenly stopped booting reliably or even getting to the Apple logo. It probably had the problem listed at https://www.apple.com/support/macbookpro.... Fortunately, the helpdesk at my work had an identical vintage machine in storage, so we just swapped SSDs, and I was good to go in under 20 minutes.

Try that if the SSD is soldered to the mobo.

cwerdna -

As a pro of 40 years+ standing, I consider 4x Thunderbolt 3 to be ideal.

Where else can I get that?

henry3dogg -

@Cwerdna

Most likely it was the connector that was faulty. In which case you wouldn't have needed to.

henry3dogg -

@Eric: Also, don't care about 3 Thunderbolt 3 ports. They're of 0 use to me w/o adapters. I work on iOS software. I use the Thunderbolt 2 ports and Magsafe on my work laptop each day, since I have 2 Thunderbolt displays. I plug in USB iOS devices sometimes directly into the laptop. I also at least daily plug in a USB 3.0 external hard drive for Time Machine backups. We sometimes project at meetings via Thunderbolt 2 or HDMI. Now I need to be a "pro" by needing a wad of adapters.

With one of these new laptops, my displays can't power my laptop and the extra Magsafe brick will become useless. I'll need to spring for a $79 brick + $19 USB-C cable. And, if I don't scavenge a power cord from a retired machine (so the brick doesn't block a bunch of outlets), it's another $19 for a cord: https://9to5mac.com/2016/11/10/opinion-m....

cwerdna -

Ummm, 4 USB-C ports that happen to carry Thunderbolt isn't "pro"... You will need adapters to use them with current Thunderbolt gear anyway in which case you can use adapters on the older MacBook Pro's to add more ports anyway... What's the difference? At least with the older MacBook Pro you don't NEED adapters to use HDMI, USB, SD Card reader or Thunderbolt.

djlobb01 -

@henry3dogg

Which other laptops have Thunderbolt 3? A complete list would be too long: Asus, Acer, Dell, HP, Lenovo, Razer, etc. But here's a list of TB3 laptops ranging from 13' ultra books to 17' professional machines.

http://www.ultrabookreview.com/10579-lap...

As you can see, most of them have REMOVABLE SSDs. Many have CPUs equivalent to the new MacBook Pro, and with a similar size/weight but at much lower prices. There are even quite a few that have 32GB RAM available.

(And with a removable SSD, it's easy to upgrade a laptop to a HD as fast as the new MBP next year.)

I've been a long time Apple enthusiast, but the new MBP is underwhelming and disappointing.

Victor Szulc -

for all those interested, the SSD isn't actually soldered. It's just a special form factor; not M.2 or anything common. All modern laptops have soldered processors, it is unfair to ding Apple for doing this when Dell, Lenovo, MSI, ASUS, Acer, Razer, HP, and other companies all do it too. People can easily get a dongle for the USB C, c'mon guys, you're spending ~$4,000 like me, you can afford a single adapter from amazon. The battery life is already significantly better than almost all windows laptops, the only exclusion may the Lenovo ThinkPads. Very few companies offer displays as bright/colorful as Apple.

Lastly, M.2/NVMe would mean sacrificing the speed that these MacBooks ships with today. Why would you rather have a slower SSD with a common form factor when you can have a super fast SSD with a specialized form? They're SSDs anyway, it's highly unlikely for them to fail unless you're writing to the disk and reading from it 24/7/365.

Norton -

@norton12 You must be thinking of a different model. This is not an SSD with a custom form factor, it's just a handful of ICs soldered directly to the main board—both sides of it, in fact.

Jeff Suovanen -

Does this model have a removable touch id (power button) as the 13" model did?

Ryan Tucker - Reply

Yes it does.

Jeff Suovanen -

No it doesn't.

Though that depends on what you mean by: "removable". Is it theoretically removable, meaning that there is a small chance that Apple can replace it, instead of giving you a new MacBook? Possibly.

Can you do it yourself or in a repair shop? Not a chance in !&&* with all that glue. At least not in one piece. And you won't be able to get parts.

Victor Szulc -

We didn't show it in the teardown, but to reiterate: the Touch ID / power button is perfectly removable. Unlike the Touch Bar it's secured with screws, not glue. It's still presumably paired to the logic board at the factory for security reasons, so you can't replace it yourself without disabling Touch ID—but if the question is simply "Can you remove it?" the answer is yes.

Jeff Suovanen -

I wonder what would the 2T SSD consist of.

Yongfan Men - Reply

Perhaps an eDRAM with integrated Graphics would make the MacBook Pro "GDDR-free", therefore it's possible to put more RAM chip on it.

Xizhi Ma - Reply

there is space for ram on the back side. don't need to remove the discrete graphic.

quoting apple, the lack of 32gb option at this time is due to battery life. presumably the next gen 15" will have more efficient processor and ram, and larger battery, thereby allowing the additional ram spaces to be used.

Kim Zhou -

The 16 GB limit is due to using LPDDR3 as opposed to DDR4. The Skylake memory controller doesn't support LPDDR4, and I don't believe Kaby Lake will either, so it will be a while before we see a MacBook Pro with more than 16 GB of RAM.

repoman27 -

Bleah........

marconne2001 - Reply

Apple has lost their mind with that soldered SSD

rgarjr - Reply

These Comments rapidly fade out after the first few Month on the Market, because it will be copied by all the Competitors and become no longer relevant. Pro-User will buy 1TB or 2GB, all Consumers buy 256GB or maybe 512GB, if Money they realize 200 Bucks are cheap for such fast Storage.

Icke -

Icke:

What rubbish! There are already companies that are making laptops as thin as the MacBook Pro that use NVME, heck even the non-TouchBar 13" 2016 MBP uses a proprietary port, but atleast it's upgradable... People have their laptops for quite a while generally, not being able to upgrade storage down the line is ridiculous and only applies to small tablet PC's like the Surface "Pro", so in essence, Apple is copying Microsoft, as they have soldered storage on both their Surface Pro and Surface Book...

djlobb01 -

Soldered on SSD sucks, but apple have been doing it for a while now, which was why I took so long to update to a new laptop as I wass *hoping* apple would come back too their senses on this one. Alas.

shayne.oneill -

13inch non touchbar version could be the last MacBook Pro with removable SSD, I buying one next week because of this. If they do upgrade next year with 32gb ram which is great they may well all be soldered SSDs which is not so great :/

Adz - Reply

What camera does iFixit use for the photos?

Nicholas Ouimet - Reply

What about the microphone array (3 mikes)? In the 13" teardown you showed the third mike being out of place (unused). In the 15" this mike appears to be underneath the grille. So there must be three (3) real holes in that grille upper left hand side. I would appreciate if you could show that detail, because it is the first ever Macbook with a 3-mike array. Cool! And based on the distance among each other, it will work for 6-8 kHz signals (hence HQ speech). So expect clear FaceTime and better Siri performance.

weruaga - Reply

If you are iSheep then this is the best way to throw your money if you are a Pro then go to the Windows/Linux laptops from brands like ASUS, MSI or Gigabyte and if you want maximum flexibility go with Clevo brands like Sager, XMG, Eurocom and many other brands.

mosabrawi - Reply

ASUS, MSI, and Gigabyte all have very "non-pro" customer support. You can walk into any Apple Store with your MacBook and get in-person customer support.

Eric -

A MacBook Pro will last twice a long as any of them and still have significant residual value.

henry3dogg -

henry3dogg: "A MacBook Pro will last twice a long as any of them."

You state that like it's 100% fact, not very clever... I beg to differ, as I am sure iFixit will attest. I had to repair a 2013 MBP which had a faulty SSD drive (not port, but drive itself). If that happens on the new MBP well than you can bet that you'll need a new logic board, If that happens on a Clevo, MSI or ASUS, it's as simple as swapping the part, everything down to the graphics card and RAM is swappable/repairable too. Don't talk rubbish unless you know what you are talking about. Very rarely has there been problems with the port/connector itself.

Eric: What's the point of great customer service if the computer has no serviceable parts apart from the trackpad?

Also I would say MSI and some Clevo brands like Sager and Metabox, are very good and responsive with customer support. There isn't really the walk-into-the-store type support but they respond quickly and their shipping is excellent.

djlobb01 -

iSheep. How very clever and mature!

And that's pretty poor advice too. For a MBP user a good replacement would be a workstations-class machine like Dell Precision, Lenovo P-series or HP Z book. (Esp. The latter.)

They all come with a similar battery life and weight/thickness as the 15' MBP, and some of them can have 32GB RAM. (Apparently not a great engineering challenge after all.)

I recommend people take a look. Apple will keep ignoring the Mac until they see sales suffer.

Victor Szulc -

To replace keyboard we have to first take the touch bar out or

without taking the touchbar we can replace keyboard.pls help I

want to know its technical side.i need help from ifixit engineers engineers pls help soon as possible

muhammed dilshad - Reply

Touchbar and keyboard are most likely to be removed separate. So no worries.

Sander Schaeffer -

Pls help ifixit engineer

muhammed dilshad - Reply

You didn't show keyboard replacement guide

muhammed dilshad - Reply

Pls show the keyboard replacement guide for 15"macbook pro touchbar

muhammed dilshad - Reply

For curiosity's sake, does the second fan cover house an equally sized fan with the same split fin design?

tipoo - Reply

What style keyboard keys are on the 15 inch macbook pro with touchbar... i need to get english/russian keycaps

Ryan Zschau - Reply

Curious if anyone is having heat issues with the new touch bar? I actually returned mine, it was getting too hot to scroll. Maybe I had a defective unit.

And askudra, really? Laptops are about balance and I suspect you know that but are just trolling for reaction.

Rob Bonner - Reply

Was the fan running?

henry3dogg -

There is always a tradeoff between reliability and upgradability in a laptop. I service and repair Macs and PCs for a living. RAM slots are the most common point of failure in a portable device. I agree that the un-upgradable SSD is an issue, but I have rarely seen users, even "Pro" users, upgrade storage after initial purchase. If you need to upgrade storage or RAM after you purchase a laptop, you obviously didn't buy the right machine to start with.

Jay Weiss - Reply

Two points: 1: If you want upgradable storage in a Mac laptop, you can't get a TouchBar. You have to get the Function-Key model or an older generation.

2: If you keep your laptop for a long time, replacing/upgrading the storage can become important. Especially if you can't afford to shell out for the biggest SSD at the time you bought the computer.

shamino -

Nonsense. Storage gets faster and more compact with time. It's nice to replace the original SSD with a 2019 SSD in three years.

It's also one of the reasons why MacBooks have so high resale value. Well used to have. This one won't, with the lack of RAM/SSD upgrades.

TCO is important for pro's.

Victor Szulc -

Your argument that Apple has to solder everything down to make the machine reliable makes no sense. RAM and SSD rarely fail due to a faulty or loose connections. The most common point of failures on a laptop are the keyboard, the hinges, cracked screens from drops, SSDs that fail internally, HDs that are dropped or fail internally, and broken power connectors and cords. Every single one of those components would be extremely difficult to replace on the MBP. Lenovo manages to make very reliable Thinkpads that pass MILSPEC testing (drops, vibration, etc.) which have replaceable keyboards, RAM, SSD, wifi, etc. My Thinkpad T450s weighs 3.26 lbs with a 14" screen and everything is replaceable--I know because I upgraded the LCD and the RAM with *standard* parts. Trying to upgrade the 2016 15" MBP is basically impossible and trying to fix it is extremely difficult and expensive. I would rather have a laptop which costs half the price and is fixable than Apple's planned obsolescence.

amosbatto -

SSDs don't last forever. They're limited by the number of write cycles. Once an SSD has these depleted it's dead, and so is any machine with the SSD soldered in place. The new MacBook Pro is a throw-away piece of garbage.

B. Deiter -

What about the screen? Does it still use the LP154WT1 panel?

No Thanks - Reply

@iFixit

Not sure if someone else covered this yet, but...

I think that port with the cover (Step 3) is the PCIe rails for the SSD. The PCIe rails traces are split and the little cover has a PCB in it that joins the traces.

If you get a chance test this by removing the cover, boot the machine off off a USB stick and see if the SSD is still detected.

Hopefully someone in the future will whip up a adapter with a long cable (think GPU extension cables) that goes into a PCIe x4 slot.

Jason Simonelli - Reply

Does the bottom cover allow installing the new security type locks like the Retina MacBook Pro's and Air's did? Some install a plate in a side screw hole others use a rear foot replacement.

salpjs - Reply

The lack of repair options and the fact all major parts are soldered in place will start to cause problems and we will increasingly have to consider machines like this as 'disposable'. So much for Apple's green credentials and I certainly don't have the kind of wallet to constantly replace kit with every new upgrade. This has become clear to me today with getting a new Macbook Pro for work only to discover a non-working touchbar after opening the box! So much for getting on with some work and putting the new machine through it's paces. And thanks Apple for your sympathy and support - just refunding the purchase and advising to re-order and take my changes again was a bit unexpected. Sad to say Apple has lost me as a customer and when the gaffer tape keeping my old 2009 Pro together stops working it will be a cheaper PC with a full keyboard.

Andy Irv - Reply

what 's NAND technology for smsg SSD? 3D or 2D?

Wade Guo - Reply

Better than 2D or 3D - 4D!

mosburger -

Can't we give this a repairability score of ZERO ?

fleubis - Reply

I'm not sure how much people need to worry about repairability of soldered and glued components, Just because we can't repair it on our living room floor doesn't mean it's not repairable. I've sent MBPs in to be repaired and gotten excellent service with a reasonable price. I am not interested in upgrades- for this price I am buying a machine that will last me a minimum of 4 years in terms of specs and reliability. I think a vast minority of people have failures with soldered on components, they are generally faster and more reliable.

I've never bought apple care before but I did this time since it is a major revision. A three year warranty on factory defects is worth $350, they will certainly attempt repair on much more than I ever would.

I might have the best of intentions but a spudger will generally not get me there: I'm all for DIY but anyone seriously griping about an inability to refurbish a computer with a *!&*^#% screwdriver can go get themselves a Babbage machine.

Just watch the coffee spills :/

Dave Naisuler - Reply

Where is the wifi Chipset for the 802.11 and Bluetooth? why didnt you guys list it for the 15 inch model and you listed it for the 13 inch?

Moe Khan - Reply

Hey there Moe Khan! In step 10 there is the Murata/Apple Wi-Fi chip. This is likely a combination of both Wi-Fi and Bluetooth. Unfortunately this is a proprietary chip, so there is no publicly available data sheet (at least as far as I know). This means we can't confirm that this is FOR SURE a Bluetooth chip. We are just "pretty sure". I hope this helps you! (I also responded to your post on the 13" MBP with Touch Bar).

Scott Havard -

It is the silver colored chip shown in step 10 is the Murata 339S00056 based on the BCM94602 chip

Leonel Tirado -

Is the Radeon 450 chip soldered to logic board?

Name Face - Reply

Obviously was to be soldered a PCIe connector of Graphic Card takes up too much space

Leonel Tirado -

I can't see the name of the DAC chip which is being used (the ADC chip is listed) - can anyone make out?

Robert Slowley - Reply

What defines a piece of gear as "Pro" is its field serviceability.

The newest MacBook "Pros" have pretty much 0 field serviceability.

I think they need to rebrand them as the new Mac Airs or something.

C'mon - the battery is GLUED

NO ESCAPE KEY

Pros do not need thin - they need serviceability and ports!

Pro gear is _always_ heavier with more expansion and modularity.

I think Apple is really doing a great job at !#^&^$^ its hard-core 1% user base who got it through the dark days.

Drive full? Toss the machine in the trash and pony up for one with a larger soldered-on ssd

If it were up to Apple we would all be soldered to our chairs at work.

WAY TO GO APPLE

Daniel Fuller - Reply

Might as well call it MacBook Prosumer

Daniel Fuller - Reply

Is there still a magnetic lid-is-closed switch/sensor?

Used to use the weak magnet trick to get internal display to go off when using external. Magnet sweep around perimeter does nothing on this.

Don Tipton - Reply

Came here looking for the same answer. I'm a bit leery of just dragging a magnet around until I find the right place. I am hoping someone knows if the magnet trick still works.

Michael Minton -

Were you able to discover if there is still a hall sensor on the laptop? I, too, used a magnet to force the internal display off when connected to an external monitor. I've tried moving a magnet around the entire laptop but could not get it to sleep. Perhaps Apple made the lid sensor now incorporated into the hinge?

Ethan Chu -

Same question here. I also tried to drag around a magnet without success. I think Apple might have changed the sleep magnet mechanism. Maybe they no longer use the sleep magnet method for display sleep :(

Hope somebody can clarify this.

agusriady22 -

I think I found the answer: Its no longer use a magnet. I guess the display sleep mechanism is in the hinge.

Try to close the lid and leave about 1cm before the top and bottom case meet together, it will turn off the display without fully close the lid.

Not an ideal way to sleep the display compared to magnet method, but at least you can still do it without fully close the lid. And at least this method should be cooler to the machine compared to fully close the lid.

agusriady22 -

Return key has broken a month after purchase. Was stuck, now is literally falling off.

PyGuy Charles - Reply

I have long hesitated to switch from PC to MAC but this new MacBook Pro convinced me to stay with windows: I can hear, with some effort, the argument saying that soldered SSD/RAM are more reliable than connected. But battery? Common, a battery will age and die no matter the type of connexion. Now you have to go through apple just to change the battery!

About reliability, you buy a MAC knowing that you will recover part of your purchase when you will resell it. If Apple is so confident about its product reliability, why do they offer only 1 year of standard warranty and maximum 3 years (no possibility to get 5 years even if you pay)? Thinkpad standard is 3 years and can be extended to 5 years! Just this warranty policy plus the everything-soldered rise a red-alarm in my mind. I think that the resell value of this new MacBook Pro will be lower in proportion than the one of the former models which were more repairable.

Dalescher - Reply

The machine CAN be repairable by the RIGHT person/independent shop. No need to worry about battery being glued and what not, if you have the money and WANT this machine, just get it and if it breaks (provided NOT by accident) take it to apple and they WILL fix it, if it breaks (INCLUDING accidental damage) outside warranty, make sure you do your due diligence and find yourself a reliable repair tech that can FIX your computer for years to come!

I personally WILL NOT buy this device since I have no money, desire nor need to own it.

Yustina - Reply

Intel SR2NH corresponds to QMS180

Leonel Tirado - Reply

Could someone please tell me the weight of the battery?

Janos - Reply

my cousin gave me a 15" macbook pro 2016 but he didn't pay the extra $100 to upgrade the video card from 455 to the 460. Looks like it's not fused - would it be possible to open this puppy up and change it out?

mOUs3y - Reply

This is the worst designed computer I've ever seen in my life. I had to get one of these to confirm compatibility of our software products on one of the new MacBook Pro's. Our software works, so guess what? I'm returning this thing tomorrow. Normally I'd be geeking out and playing with the thing and looking forward to using it for years to come, but this thing is a piece of rubbish.

Apple should seriously consider spinning off the OS X (excuse me, macOS) and Mac computer division to another, independent firm that understands how people use computers and what features they want. This thing, like the "fire hydrant" Mac Pro is a throw away. This is NOT a computer for professional users.

...I think it's time to start looking at BSD and Linux again.

B. Deiter - Reply

Just purchased a new MBP 15", hopefully it will do 6 years like the last one before failing. Keeping a laptop for longer is much more environmentally friendly than my work colleagues whose Dell laptops get replaced every 3 years (leased from Dell), but in nearly all cases have required at least one repair in those 3 years so replacement after 3 years is a moot point. Also the 6 year old Mac still benchmarked (Geekbench 4) ahead of colleagues new Dell and the cost of 2 Dells over the 6 years is considerably higher than the one Mac. So I saved money, got a better machines, and it was good for the environment. Hopefully work out well this time as well. (Not criticizing the iFixit teardown in any way, if the machine did fail you would have to take it back to Apple since own repair almost impossible as iFixit point out.)

howardlovatt - Reply

Just wonder where does the Intel HD Graphics 530 locate?

siqi.li15 - Reply

That's internal to the Intel Core i7-6700HQ—you can't see it unless you rip into the CPU itself, and even then it's just a cluster of cores on the CPU die. Here's an example of what that looks like (albeit on a completely different chip). ;)

Jeff Suovanen -

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