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Introduction

I broke my LG 25UM58-P LCD panel. Since there weren't any teardowns or disassembly guides online, it was only fitting to do one before it went in the bin.

This teardown is not a repair guide. To repair your LG 25UM58-P, use our service manual.

  1. Top Tip: If you don't leave an HDMI cable attached to your monitor, you can't trip over it, and destroy your display. Top Tip: If you don't leave an HDMI cable attached to your monitor, you can't trip over it, and destroy your display. Top Tip: If you don't leave an HDMI cable attached to your monitor, you can't trip over it, and destroy your display.
    • Top Tip: If you don't leave an HDMI cable attached to your monitor, you can't trip over it, and destroy your display.

  2. The base plate can be removed by undoing the screw as seen in the second image. Captive D-Ring screw
    • The base plate can be removed by undoing the screw as seen in the second image.

    • Captive D-Ring screw

  3. The stand is secrured to the monitor frame with 2 Phillips screws. The small cover needs to be pushed down to disengage the clip. Slide up in  order to reveal the screws.
    • The stand is secrured to the monitor frame with 2 Phillips screws.

    • The small cover needs to be pushed down to disengage the clip.

    • Slide up in order to reveal the screws.

    • 2 x Phillips #1 screws

  4. There are 2 Phillips #2 screws holding the lower trim, with the LG logo, onto the monitor. There are 2 Phillips #2 screws holding the lower trim, with the LG logo, onto the monitor.
    • There are 2 Phillips #2 screws holding the lower trim, with the LG logo, onto the monitor.

  5. The lower trim piece lifts off with some persuasion. The screen is held on with an overengineered system of clip and tabs. The only method that personally worked, was to pry at the display and lever it out. The guitar picks were used to hold the display panel up and prevent it from clipping back in.
    • The lower trim piece lifts off with some persuasion.

    • The screen is held on with an overengineered system of clip and tabs. The only method that personally worked, was to pry at the display and lever it out.

    • The guitar picks were used to hold the display panel up and prevent it from clipping back in.

  6. Once you work your way around the edge of the display, and release all the clips, the panel will be free. Once you work your way around the edge of the display, and release all the clips, the panel will be free.
    • Once you work your way around the edge of the display, and release all the clips, the panel will be free.

  7. The rear cover separates from the LCD panel, revealing the surprisingly tiny control board
    • The rear cover separates from the LCD panel, revealing the surprisingly tiny control board

  8. Some close-ups of the clips and mechanism used to secure the rear cover  to the LCD panel Some close-ups of the clips and mechanism used to secure the rear cover  to the LCD panel Some close-ups of the clips and mechanism used to secure the rear cover  to the LCD panel
    • Some close-ups of the clips and mechanism used to secure the rear cover to the LCD panel

  9. The panel model appears to be: LM250WW1 The LCD itself has the part number: BBSU1V 3467C2 The rear housing is stamped with the part number: MCK67880501
    • The panel model appears to be: LM250WW1

    • The LCD itself has the part number: BBSU1V 3467C2

    • The rear housing is stamped with the part number: MCK67880501

  10. A closer look at the mounting method shows that there are a series of plastic "rods" that slide into slots on the LCD panel frame. The "rods" then attach to the clips on the rear housing as seen in Step 8. A closer look at the mounting method shows that there are a series of plastic "rods" that slide into slots on the LCD panel frame. The "rods" then attach to the clips on the rear housing as seen in Step 8. A closer look at the mounting method shows that there are a series of plastic "rods" that slide into slots on the LCD panel frame. The "rods" then attach to the clips on the rear housing as seen in Step 8.
    • A closer look at the mounting method shows that there are a series of plastic "rods" that slide into slots on the LCD panel frame. The "rods" then attach to the clips on the rear housing as seen in Step 8.

  11. Judging by the markings on the motherboard, it appears that the same PCB is used for the 34UM58. The part number of the board appears to be: 692M000F-002 63624404 The part number of the board appears to be: 692M000F-002 63624404
    • Judging by the markings on the motherboard, it appears that the same PCB is used for the 34UM58.

    • The part number of the board appears to be: 692M000F-002 63624404

  12. 4 x #1 Phillips screws are used to secure the hinge plate to the back of the LCD panel. 2 x #2 Phillips screws are used to secure the hinge itself to the LCD panel. 2 x #2 Phillips screws are used to secure the hinge itself to the LCD panel.
    • 4 x #1 Phillips screws are used to secure the hinge plate to the back of the LCD panel.

    • 2 x #2 Phillips screws are used to secure the hinge itself to the LCD panel.

  13. Carefully route the cables away, from the hinge panel. With the 6 screws removed from the previous step, the hinge assembly can be  lifted away.
    • Carefully route the cables away, from the hinge panel.

    • With the 6 screws removed from the previous step, the hinge assembly can be lifted away.

  14. The LCD panel itself can be separated from  the backlight. Part number: BBSU1V 3467C2 Part number: BBSU1V 3467C2
    • The LCD panel itself can be separated from the backlight.

    • Part number: BBSU1V 3467C2

  15. A fairly tricky monitor to disassemble.
    • A fairly tricky monitor to disassemble.

    • I'm 90% sure that removal of the LCD panel from the housing/frame will cause it to shatter (if it wasn't already damaged).

    • Replacement panels are about the same cost as replacing the entire monitor itself, making repairs unfeasible.

Rushil Kisoon

Member since: 02/18/2018

251 Reputation

1 Guide authored

One Comment

Sorry to hear that happened. But it made for a really good teardown

Jacob Mehnert - Reply

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