Introduction

Tripped over your power cord? At least you don't have to replace the entire logic board.

Image 1/2: Lift the battery out of the computer. Image 2/2: Lift the battery out of the computer.
  • Use a coin to rotate the battery locking screw 90 degrees clockwise.

  • Lift the battery out of the computer.

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Image 1/1: Remove the three hex screws using a T8 Torx screwdriver.
  • Close the display and flip the computer over.

  • Remove the three hex screws using a T8 Torx screwdriver.

  • The shorter screw is in the center.

Oop's sorry on my earlier note I meant to say in step 2

Keith - Reply

In my iBook G4 (Fr), there's no T8 Torx but nut driver.

boninj - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Use a spudger or small flathead screwdriver to remove the three rubber feet from the lower case.

Be careful, the rubber feet tend to jump out and get lost.

Lakshmana - Reply

Image 1/1: One screw is underneath each bumper (three total).
  • Remove the three newly-revealed Phillips screws.

  • One screw is underneath each bumper (three total).

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Image 1/1:
  • Use a spudger or small flathead screwdriver to pry up the three metal rings that housed the rubber bumpers.

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Image 1/1:
  • Remove the two Phillips screws on either side of the battery contacts.

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Image 1/1: Push in the thin rims of the lower case surrounding the battery compartment, bending them past the tabs, and then lift up to free that corner of the lower case.
  • Breathe deeply. Trying times are ahead, but we promise the lower case does come off.

  • Push in the thin rims of the lower case surrounding the battery compartment, bending them past the tabs, and then lift up to free that corner of the lower case.

This part scared me, never in an iFixIt guide have I seen a warning like "trying times are ahead".

I used a plastic iPod opening tool and ran it around the seam in the same order pictured. I had the plastic off in less than a minute with almost no fuss.

PohTayToez - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • There is a slot on the wall of the battery compartment that locks the lower case in place. Use a small flathead screwdriver to pry out the slot's lower rim and pull up on the lower case to free the slot from the tabs holding it.

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Image 1/1:
  • Run a spudger along the seam between the lower case and upper case on the front of the computer to free the tabs locking the lower case. Pull up on the lower case and continue to use the spudger as necessary until you hear three distinct clicks.

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Image 1/1:
  • Continue to run the spudger around the front, right corner. There are two tabs on the port side of the computer, one near the front corner and one near the sound-out port.

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Image 1/1:
  • There are three tabs over the optical drive that must be released before the lower case can come off. Slide the spudger into the lower case above the optical drive and run it toward the back of the computer until you hear three distinct clicks.

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Image 1/1: Turn the computer so that the back is facing you and pull the lower case up and toward you until the back tabs pop free.
  • The front and sides of the lower case are now free.

  • Turn the computer so that the back is facing you and pull the lower case up and toward you until the back tabs pop free.

  • It may be helpful to jiggle the case up and down.

I found it easier and "safer" to use a spudge at the back as well (two on each side of the hinge)

Paulix - Reply

Quote from Paulix:

I found it easier and "safer" to use a spudge at the back as well (two on each side of the hinge)

I did too. Thanks, Paulix.

Ryan Cabanas - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Remove the small greasy springs with white plastic caps from either side of the battery contacts.

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Image 1/1: Six 3 mm Phillips
  • Remove the following 10 screws from the bottom shield:

    • Six 3 mm Phillips

    • Three 7.5 mm Phillips

    • One 14 mm Phillips

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Image 1/1:
  • Lift the bottom shield off.

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Image 1/1:
  • Remove the single Phillips screw securing the DC-In board.

You might not need to remove the entire DC-In board and cable. This is removed because the DC-In jack blocks the upper case from being lifted off. I just removed the screw and pushed the board slightly in when removing the upper case to provide clearance. You may want to tape the board loosely in place when the screw is out to prevent it from falling out.

georgie333 - Reply

Image 1/1: You may need to remove tape that secures the DC-In board cable to the case.
  • Angle the DC-In board out of its compartment.

  • You may need to remove tape that secures the DC-In board cable to the case.

You need to undo the adhesive halfway down the cable, so you can lift the DC board to angle it out correctly. beefybov

beefybov - Reply

Quote from beefybov:

You need to undo the adhesive halfway down the cable, so you can lift the DC board to angle it out correctly. beefybov

Good call, beefybov.

Ryan Cabanas - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • Lift the DC-In cable from the adhesive attaching it to the logic board.

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Image 1/1: Wiggling the connector parallel to the surface of the logic board while applying slight tension may aid in removal.
  • Disconnect the DC-In cable from the logic board.

  • Wiggling the connector parallel to the surface of the logic board while applying slight tension may aid in removal.

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Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

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4 Comments

On my older iBook G4 the screws where a 5/64 allen head 1.1ghz model

Keith - Reply

it was my first time opening up a laptop and I did not have any problem this tutorial is very helpful because it shows you the process step by step something hard to find nowadays

Baye - Reply

This was a really easy guide thanks. I had ordered a replacement DC in board but found after opening I could have probably repaired the existing one. It had been tripped over a few too many times. I think a bit of re-soldering on the connector where the tape covers in step 17 may have fixed mine. Now I have a backup at least.

ryanligon - Reply

Hi,

Does anyone happen to know the values of the L2 and L3 parts on this DC-in board?

I am looking to reuse them but I cannot find any specs.

Thank you and regards,

Vincent

Vincent Gerris - Reply

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