Introduction

When you want to fix a hole in a pair of jeans quickly and with a minimum of fuss, go for an iron-on patch. They’re easy to use (like patching a bike inner tube) and durable. Be sure to purchase a patch that’s clearly labeled as an “iron-on."

For replacement parts or further assistance, contact Patagonia Customer Service.

Image 1/2: Grab your iron-on patch. Image 2/2: We are using a contrasting patch for visibility, but you may want something that matches with your jeans or a fun contrasting color.
  • Examine the damage – cut off any long threads and clean off any debris.

  • Grab your iron-on patch.

    • We are using a contrasting patch for visibility, but you may want something that matches with your jeans or a fun contrasting color.

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Image 1/3: Take a scrap of denim and place it inside the pant leg, beneath the hole. Image 2/3: This scrap material will keep your patch from sticking the front of your jeans to the back, which would effectively seal the leg opening shut (not a good thing...) Image 3/3: This scrap material will keep your patch from sticking the front of your jeans to the back, which would effectively seal the leg opening shut (not a good thing...)
  • Preheat your iron according to the recommended settings found on the packaging information included with the patch.

  • Take a scrap of denim and place it inside the pant leg, beneath the hole.

    • This scrap material will keep your patch from sticking the front of your jeans to the back, which would effectively seal the leg opening shut (not a good thing...)

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Image 1/2: In our case the hole is about 1.5 inches by 2 inches. Image 2/2: In our case the hole is about 1.5 inches by 2 inches.
  • Measure the length and width of the hole in your jeans, including any damaged area around the hole.

    • In our case the hole is about 1.5 inches by 2 inches.

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Image 1/2: Mark your final patch measurements on the patch with tailor’s chalk. Image 2/2: Mark your final patch measurements on the patch with tailor’s chalk.
  • Add at least a half-inch in both directions to get your final patch measurements.

  • Mark your final patch measurements on the patch with tailor’s chalk.

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Image 1/2: Round the corners of the patch, to prevent them from peeling up. Image 2/2: Round the corners of the patch, to prevent them from peeling up.
  • Cut the patch along your marks.

  • Round the corners of the patch, to prevent them from peeling up.

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Image 1/3: Image 2/3: Image 3/3:
  • Lay your cut patch over the hole and position it where you want it.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Iron the patch according to the package instructions, usually from between 30-45 seconds. Keep the iron moving and try to apply even heat to the whole patch.

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Image 1/2: Image 2/2:
  • Run your finger around the edge of the patch to ensue that all the edges are completely bonded to your jeans.

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Image 1/3: Gently try and lift the scrap of fabric from the inside of the pant leg. Image 2/3: If the scrap comes off, you no longer need it. Image 3/3: If the scrap is held firmly in place by the patch, simply trim away the excess fabric from where the scrap is adhered with your scissors, leaving the remaining scrap in place.
  • Turn the pant leg inside out.

  • Gently try and lift the scrap of fabric from the inside of the pant leg.

    • If the scrap comes off, you no longer need it.

    • If the scrap is held firmly in place by the patch, simply trim away the excess fabric from where the scrap is adhered with your scissors, leaving the remaining scrap in place.

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Conclusion

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Brittany McCrigler

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One Comment

This is useful, but I hope we can see more. In particular, my kids have many holes in polar fleece pants that they love. You can't do an iron-on patch with fleece (the synthetic fiber can't take the heat), and sewing on a patch doesn't seem like a great idea since the material is stretchier than the patch. Does Patagonia have advice on how to repair these?

Raphael Sperry - Reply

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