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Introduction

When a lunch bag handle gets ripped, people deem it unusable and end up buying a new one. In order to reduce waste, this guide is to instruct how to repair that rip using a few simple steps. No prior knowledge of how to sew is required as this guide will teach you step by step.

  1. Find colored thread to match the color of the lunch bag and a needle. Find colored thread to match the color of the lunch bag and a needle.
    • Find colored thread to match the color of the lunch bag and a needle.

  2. Gather thread that is 3 to 4 times the length of the part that needs to be sewn. Measure 18 inches of thread and double it. Cut the thread to match the length of the ruler. Cut the thread to match the length of the ruler.
    • Gather thread that is 3 to 4 times the length of the part that needs to be sewn. Measure 18 inches of thread and double it.

    • Cut the thread to match the length of the ruler.

  3. Loop one end of the thread through needle. Wet the end of the thread if needed to make it easier to thread. Move the needle to the middle of the thread to have even amounts of thread on each side.
    • Loop one end of the thread through needle.

    • Wet the end of the thread if needed to make it easier to thread.

    • Move the needle to the middle of the thread to have even amounts of thread on each side.

  4. Tie knot at the end of string and repeat 3x. Try to place all knots in the same place. This will make the knot larger, so the thread stays in place on the lunchbox and does not pull through. This will make the knot larger, so the thread stays in place on the lunchbox and does not pull through.
    • Tie knot at the end of string and repeat 3x. Try to place all knots in the same place.

    • This will make the knot larger, so the thread stays in place on the lunchbox and does not pull through.

  5. Thread the needle through the lunchbox and handle. Pull all the way through, until the knot stops. Start on the inside, so the knot is not visible at the end. Stick the needle the opposite direction, about a ¼” away from the first stitch. Leave room between your first and second stitch. Thread the needle through the lunchbox and handle. Pull all the way through, until the knot stops. Start on the inside, so the knot is not visible at the end. Stick the needle the opposite direction, about a ¼” away from the first stitch. Leave room between your first and second stitch. Thread the needle through the lunchbox and handle. Pull all the way through, until the knot stops. Start on the inside, so the knot is not visible at the end. Stick the needle the opposite direction, about a ¼” away from the first stitch. Leave room between your first and second stitch.
    • Thread the needle through the lunchbox and handle. Pull all the way through, until the knot stops. Start on the inside, so the knot is not visible at the end. Stick the needle the opposite direction, about a ¼” away from the first stitch. Leave room between your first and second stitch.

  6. Thread the needle back through the lunchbox and handle in the space between your first and second stitch. Continue to stitch every other space, until you have sewed the handle back in place. Continue to stitch every other space, until you have sewed the handle back in place.
    • Thread the needle back through the lunchbox and handle in the space between your first and second stitch.

    • Continue to stitch every other space, until you have sewed the handle back in place.

  7. To end the last stitch, thread the needle between the lunchbox and thread of your last stitch. Rather than pulling the thread completely through, thread the needle back through the excess thread to make a knot. You can continue looping the needle about the thread to make the knot extra secure. You can continue looping the needle about the thread to make the knot extra secure.
    • To end the last stitch, thread the needle between the lunchbox and thread of your last stitch. Rather than pulling the thread completely through, thread the needle back through the excess thread to make a knot.

    • You can continue looping the needle about the thread to make the knot extra secure.

  8. Trim the excess thread as short as possible to make the stitches look clean and to avoid snagging. Your bag should now be good as new! Trim the excess thread as short as possible to make the stitches look clean and to avoid snagging. Your bag should now be good as new! Trim the excess thread as short as possible to make the stitches look clean and to avoid snagging. Your bag should now be good as new!
    • Trim the excess thread as short as possible to make the stitches look clean and to avoid snagging. Your bag should now be good as new!

Conclusion

Now your lunch bag should be good as new. There's no reason to throw a perfectly good lunch bag away when there's such a simple fix. Happy lunching!

One other person completed this guide.

Erica Lee

Member since: 10/26/2018

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UC Davis, Team S1-G5, Bender Fall 2018 Member of UC Davis, Team S1-G5, Bender Fall 2018

UCD-BENDER-F18S1G5

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