Introduction

Clothing clasps, like other garment closures such as buttons or zippers, have threads that often break, leaving a garment in a less wearable state. This particular guide shows the process of sewing on a rectangle closure hook clasp that is falling off or has become unattached. The information in this guide can be used by anyone, whether or not you have sewing experience. Before beginning the sewing, check to ensure that you have this specific type of clasp. Also, please be aware that poking your fingers with the needle is a common by-product of sewing, so be careful!

Collect the article of clothing that requires a clasp repair. Locate the clasp and identify the area that needs the sewing repair.
  • Collect the article of clothing that requires a clasp repair.

  • Locate the clasp and identify the area that needs the sewing repair.

    • If your clasp is completely removed from the garment, be sure to place it in the original store bought position.

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Choose some thread in a matching or similar color to the garment. Ensure that the type of thread is appropriate for the repair.  Avoid using embroidery floss, dental floss, or rope.
  • Choose some thread in a matching or similar color to the garment.

    • Ensure that the type of thread is appropriate for the repair. Avoid using embroidery floss, dental floss, or rope.

  • Choose a needle, preferably one that is small and thin.

    • Smaller needles leave smaller holes in the garment and are less likely to cause issues while sewing.

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Cut an arm's length of the thread. Shorter lengths of thread are easier to manage while sewing.  Longer pieces will tangle and knot.
  • Cut an arm's length of the thread.

    • Shorter lengths of thread are easier to manage while sewing. Longer pieces will tangle and knot.

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Take the cut length of thread and poke it through the eye (hole) of the needle. Take your time!  This step requires concentration and patience. Pull the thread through the eye of the needle until it is about a hand's length.
  • Take the cut length of thread and poke it through the eye (hole) of the needle.

    • Take your time! This step requires concentration and patience.

  • Pull the thread through the eye of the needle until it is about a hand's length.

    • You should now be looking at a threaded needle with thread long on one side and short on the other.

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Deck the Halls
With tools and Fix Kits
Take the threaded needle and make a simple double knot on the long end of the thread. Snip off the extra thread near the knot. Snip off the extra thread near the knot.
  • Take the threaded needle and make a simple double knot on the long end of the thread.

  • Snip off the extra thread near the knot.

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Check the garment and cut off any old pieces of thread from the clasp area. Keep in mind that this step is only necessary if the old thread from the previous sewn binding is in the way of your repair. Keep in mind that this step is only necessary if the old thread from the previous sewn binding is in the way of your repair.
  • Check the garment and cut off any old pieces of thread from the clasp area.

    • Keep in mind that this step is only necessary if the old thread from the previous sewn binding is in the way of your repair.

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Hold the clasp firmly in its desired place. Poke the needle through the inside of the garment, aiming for the inside of the clasp. Remember to always check whether or not your fingers are in the way while sewing.  Otherwise you will poke your fingers!
  • Hold the clasp firmly in its desired place.

  • Poke the needle through the inside of the garment, aiming for the inside of the clasp.

    • Remember to always check whether or not your fingers are in the way while sewing. Otherwise you will poke your fingers!

      • The end knot on the thread should always be hidden on the inside of the garment. In this example, the knot was hidden beneath the extra material on the inside of the garment. This is known as the seam allowance.

  • Pull the needle through until the knot catches and you are unable to pull anymore.

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Flip to the outside of the garment. Check to ensure that the needle is placed on the outside of the clasp before continuing. Poke the needle through the fabric.  Aim for a spot in the garment's seam to hide your new stitches.
  • Flip to the outside of the garment.

    • Check to ensure that the needle is placed on the outside of the clasp before continuing.

  • Poke the needle through the fabric. Aim for a spot in the garment's seam to hide your new stitches.

  • Pull the needle all the way through until the thread has snugly pushed the clasp close to the garment's fabric.

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Turn the garment to the inside again. Poke the needle through the fabric, aiming for the inside of the clasp.
  • Turn the garment to the inside again.

  • Poke the needle through the fabric, aiming for the inside of the clasp.

  • Tug the needle all the way through until it catches.

  • Repeat Steps 7-9 as many times as necessary. This action creates a group of stitches that hold the clasp in place.

    • More repetitions of the stitches will create a sturdier binding for the clasp.

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Make sure to end your last stitch on the inside of the garment. Poke the needle through the stitches you made and tug until there is a loop. Make sure that the loop is big enough to maneuver the needle through, but not so big that it tangles.
  • Make sure to end your last stitch on the inside of the garment.

  • Poke the needle through the stitches you made and tug until there is a loop.

    • Make sure that the loop is big enough to maneuver the needle through, but not so big that it tangles.

  • Take the needle and pull it through the center of the loop.

  • Pull the needle through the center of the loop again.

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Pull on the needle until a knot is formed on top of your stitches. Straighten the threaded needle and hold it firmly. Take a pair of scissors and snip off the extra thread.
  • Pull on the needle until a knot is formed on top of your stitches.

  • Straighten the threaded needle and hold it firmly.

  • Take a pair of scissors and snip off the extra thread.

    • Check to make sure you do not accidentally cut off the knot too!

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Examine the finished repair in good light. Test the clasp to ensure that it works properly. Check the garment and make sure that the repair stitches are not too noticeable from the outside.
  • Examine the finished repair in good light.

  • Test the clasp to ensure that it works properly.

  • Check the garment and make sure that the repair stitches are not too noticeable from the outside.

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Conclusion

You have now completed the repair of the rectangle closure hook clasp on your article of clothing. Wearing your mended clothing is highly recommended!

One other person completed this guide.

Alisa Sakakura

Member since: 04/28/2017

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UC Davis, Team S1-G3, Coad Spring 2017 Member of UC Davis, Team S1-G3, Coad Spring 2017

UCD-COAD-S17S1G3

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