Introduction

The plastic catches on the battery compartment that keeps the battery door in place, break off. They are only made of plastic after all. Since Fuji isn't selling replacement battery compartments, and used replacements might be hard to find and could break in the same way, here is a DIY fix anyone can do at home in no time at all with things you might just have at home.

DISCLAIMER: If you perform these steps like they are described, you shouldn't have any issues. Please remember though that you are modifying your camera in a way Fuji did not intend. I am not responsible for anything you accidentally do to you camera. Please take your time and think about the placement of the screws.

THINGS YOU'LL NEED:

1) super glue or Loctite

2) 3 tiny screws (or a large assortment to select from is better)

3) small drill bit (smaller the better usually)

4) small phillips screw driver (or whatever type your small screws use)

5) drill

6) knife

Image 1/2: The three spots circled in red are the latches that seem to fail over time. You'll want to take a knife and cut of the plastic left by the broken pieces so it's flat. Image 2/2: The three spots circled in red are the latches that seem to fail over time. You'll want to take a knife and cut of the plastic left by the broken pieces so it's flat.
  • Remove batteries, you could even use some tape to keep the battery door out of your way and prevent it from flopping down while you work.

  • The three spots circled in red are the latches that seem to fail over time. You'll want to take a knife and cut of the plastic left by the broken pieces so it's flat.

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Image 1/1: Please double check and adjust your drill hole placement if you think it's needed. This is what I did, and it worked.
  • After smoothing out the left over latches you are ready to drill. Drill three holes at the corners of where the old latches used to be. The picture shows the rough spot where you'll want to drill

  • Please double check and adjust your drill hole placement if you think it's needed. This is what I did, and it worked.

  • Remember to use a very small drill bit. The plastic walls are thin, and the screws we should be using are very small.

  • Be careful not to drill something you shouldn't and do not drill at an angle or drill through the wall of the battery compartment. This is the only real hard part of this repair, take your time and think about what you are doing.

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Image 1/3: Carefully thread the screws you think would be best into the holes you drilled. Remember you are creating latches using these screws. Do not screw them in all the way, that would defeat the purpose. Screw them in halfway or so, allowing the battery door to latch under the screw head. Image 2/3: The second picture shows the screws I chose. Image 3/3: The second picture shows the screws I chose.
  • After drilling the three holes, get out your assortment of tiny screws. We'll want three that are the perfect size, height and girth. Also the flatness and the size of the head of the screw is very important.

  • Carefully thread the screws you think would be best into the holes you drilled. Remember you are creating latches using these screws. Do not screw them in all the way, that would defeat the purpose. Screw them in halfway or so, allowing the battery door to latch under the screw head.

  • The second picture shows the screws I chose.

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Image 1/2: Once all screws are in place and the door latches, take a mental note of the placement and depth of the screws. Image 2/2: Pull out the screws one last time, and put in a drop of loctite or super glue and then put the screws back in making sure to get the proper screw back in the hole it came from and making sure to match the depth it had before.
  • Put in the first screw and make sure it fits, door closes and latches fine without problem before moving on to the second screw.

  • Once all screws are in place and the door latches, take a mental note of the placement and depth of the screws.

  • Pull out the screws one last time, and put in a drop of loctite or super glue and then put the screws back in making sure to get the proper screw back in the hole it came from and making sure to match the depth it had before.

  • Let your camera sit for 24 hours (or however long you can) and then enjoy! This is a very strong and possibly permanant fix for your camera!

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Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

4 other people completed this guide.

Ben Johnson

Member since: 12/27/2014

98 Reputation

1 Guide authored

2 Comments

This also worked on my S5500. I had to adapt the method slightly, because of internal damage to the battery compartment. I tied a cable tie around the metal loop on the side of the camera, where you connect the camera's neck strap. I then pulled the loose end of the cable tie down to the bottom of the battery compartment. I drilled two small holes on the outside of the battery compartment. I put the screws into the holes. Make sure they go in a part which is made of plastic (so screws don't touch the metal contacts inside the battery housing).

I cut the plastic tie end off another cable tie, and put it on the end of the first cable tie. I taped it afterwards, to stop it slipping. The entire thing acts like a catch on the outside, which you pull in between the two screws. The taped end acts as a stopper, which pulls back on the screws, to shut the battery compartment tight.

Yes, it's far messier than your solution, but this was my only option. It's fixed and it works :)

Mart - Reply

Thank you for this post. I am going to Africa and wanted to take this camera. I only have one that needs to be fixed. If it doesn't work, I will keep using a rubber band to hold the batteries in place.

Cheryl 11/2016

fsccheryl - Reply

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