Introduction

This guide performs a full disassembly of an HP Elitebook 840 G1, with the exception of the LCD.

Image 1/1:
  • You need to be able to see the latch and screws to disassemble.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • The bottom cover will then slide towards the bottom of the picture, and can be removed.

When the slide is moved to the left a screw is visible marked in red, You have to remove it to be able to move the slide al the way to the left, otherwise the locking hooks are not clearing the pins of the bottem cover enough. You can remove the bottem cover if you do not remove the screw but it is possible to break the latch(es).

jtemmink - Reply

Image 1/1:
  • One of the latches is spring-loaded, and will need to be held in the unlocked position.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: The RAM's spring-loaded arms just need to be pushed away from the RAM module, and the module will then pop up and can be slid out.
  • The HDD is held in by four Philips screws, while the RAM module has two spring-loaded arms.

  • The RAM's spring-loaded arms just need to be pushed away from the RAM module, and the module will then pop up and can be slid out.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: The card is then held in by a single screw.
  • The two red circles indicate where antennas plugged in. They simply pop upwards.

  • The card is then held in by a single screw.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • There is also a screw in the bottom right corner, which isn't pictured.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: There is a gap next to the unit's fan (circled in red) large enough for a screwdriver to pop the keyboard loose. Simply push down.
  • The two screws are spring-loaded and won't come all the way out. They just need to be loose.

  • There is a gap next to the unit's fan (circled in red) large enough for a screwdriver to pop the keyboard loose. Simply push down.

  • You might have more success if you open the unit and stand it on it's side prior to popping the keyboard loose.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • You should pull the top edge loose, and slide the keyboard upward.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: Ribbon cables are held onto their connectors by a small plastic locking latch. Those latches lift up, and the cable slides out.
  • The cable on the left can be removed from either the keyboard or the systemboard.

  • Ribbon cables are held onto their connectors by a small plastic locking latch. Those latches lift up, and the cable slides out.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • There is one on the left, and one on the right. Both are partially pictured, but were cut from the image during cropping.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • These are Philips-head, and have been circled in red.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • I find it easiest to lift from the bottom left.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: You'll notice that the top of this unit has spill damage to the systemboard, speakers, and top cover.
  • If you're repairing a user-damaged machine, this would be a great place to look for spill damage.

  • You'll notice that the top of this unit has spill damage to the systemboard, speakers, and top cover.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • They're circled in red.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: The plug in the top left is actually for the speakers, not the wireless card, but is wedging the wireless cables into their plastic guide.
  • I recommend pulling the tape and plastic protectors (circled at the bottom) off and setting them someplace safe. The tape isn't easy to replace if damaged or folded.

  • The plug in the top left is actually for the speakers, not the wireless card, but is wedging the wireless cables into their plastic guide.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • The fan is also held by a screw in the bottom right. This was partially cut off in the image.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • The ribbon cable doesn't need to fully be removed. Only the left side is needed to get the systemboard out.

Add Comment

Image 1/1:
  • If there is any resistance you should double-check that all cables and screws have been removed or disconnected.

Add Comment

Image 1/1: The power board in the top left is also removable, but normally doesn't need replacement, and the two hinges can be loosened to pull the LCD assembly off of this top cover.
  • The cable on the bottom left goes to a thumbprint scanner, while the cables on the right belong to the unit's SC Reader.

  • The power board in the top left is also removable, but normally doesn't need replacement, and the two hinges can be loosened to pull the LCD assembly off of this top cover.

Add Comment

Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

14 other people completed this guide.

thiswaywardmind

Member since: 03/03/2015

406 Reputation

1 Guide authored

9 Comments

Hi, thank you for this guide !

I successfully managed in disassembling my Elitebook 840 and change the fan.

-However-, when reassembling it, I was surprised to see that my touchpad doesn't work anymore (but the mouse nipple works perfectly). I don't really understand because I didn't disconnect anything except the keyboard (that is not connected on the same ribbon cables, so...).

I tried to reinitialize it from the Windows panel, but no luck.

Do you have an idea of what could be wrong ?

Thank you,

Ken.

kenaddams - Reply

Hi Ken,

Sorry I missed this!

Is the little orange light lit in the top-right of your touchpad? If so, double-tap on it and the touchpad should re-enable.

If the light isn't lit, that touchpad connects to the board under the battery (right side). You should double-check those cables, and then double-check where that board connects to the systemboard under your keyboard. My bet is that something is loose along that path.

Good luck!

Nic

thiswaywardmind -

Great guide.

Unfortunately due to my the speed my keyboard popped-off I broke the thin white cable in step 9. I seem to have lost backlit functionality from my keyboard but everything else is working okay. I'm assuming that's what that ribbon does but I could be incorrect. Any idea what that cable does exactly?

Shaun - Reply

Hi Shaun,

I know this is about 9 months too late, but I'm sorry to hear that the cable ripped. They are definitely pretty fragile.

Aside from the backlight, the functionality of the track point might be impacted. I wouldn't expect any other issues, though, so at least the damage is limited in scale.

Good luck on your next project!

Best,

Nic

thiswaywardmind -

I wish you had done the screen as well in your tear down, just so people know how easy the screen is to take off. I replaced my screen with a higher resolution a few months ago and it took me all of 15 minutes to do most of that time was just taking off the bezel but once that is off it's only 4 screws and unplugging the connection ribbon. Once you place the new screen and hooked up there is 4 holders so you can turn your computer on before screwing the screen on just to make sure the part is in good working condition.

Joseph Richardson - Reply

Hi Joseph,

Great suggestion!

Unfortunately, the machine I was disassembling had a touch screen, and those are fused together for the 840. If it had been non-touch, I would've gladly taken the extra few minutes to include it.

I'm glad your upgrade was a success and thanks for the tip!

Best,

Nic

thiswaywardmind -

Joseph, I am also thinking about upgrading the screen of my HP 840 to a higher res one. I currently have a 768 screen and would like full HD, but I'm worried about whether the processor can handle it. My version of the laptop only has the Intel in built HD 4400 graphics, not the dedicated graphics card. Was yours the same?

David Silverman -

Hi thanks for this guide i broke the orange cable that connets to the keyboard the keyboard arrows work but the ctrl alt del does not so i cannot log on what is the orange cable for.

ziyaadhakimjee - Reply

The orange ribbon cable is the main connector for the keyboard- I'm honestly surprised that the arrow keys still work.

New keyboards are rather cheap on E-Bay, about $15 USD or so.

Walt Findley -

Add Comment

View Statistics:

Past 24 Hours: 44

Past 7 Days: 221

Past 30 Days: 964

All Time: 30,116