Introduction

The fan in this device is set in by only a few screws, but recognize that when removing it, there are a few wires that are wrapped behind other components. Make sure not to tug or pull too hard on the wires, and rather move them out from behind the other components before completely removing the fan. Also, keep track of your screws and where they were placed in the device as there is one screw that is different from the others. This will allow for a much less frustrating reversed process!

Lay down the display with screen side up.
  • Lay down the display with screen side up.

  • Since the display is able to be tilted up and down, we found it useful to prop up the screen up with a styrofoam block in between the screen and the base.

  • Place the two suction cups on both sides of the top of the screen and make sure to lock them in place.

  • The glass screen to connected to the rest of the display by small magnets. Lift slowly and the screen will come right off.

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Unscrew the 12 screws (marked in red) around the side edges and the top of the LCD with the TR 10 Screwdriver.
  • Unscrew the 12 screws (marked in red) around the side edges and the top of the LCD with the TR 10 Screwdriver.

  • Next, unscrew the 4 remaining screws (marked in orange) at the bottom of the display with your Phillips #00 Screwdriver.

The screws marked in orange don't need to be removed, all they do is hold the magnets on the LCD.

Garrett Mace - Reply

Yes “orange screws” does not need to be removed.

You do not need a TR10 screwdriver as written in the text a T10 will suffice (more common and also correctly mentioned in the list of tools).

A TR10 screwdriver is compatible with the T10, but not the other way around

Per Lohmann Poulsen - Reply

  • Slowly lift the LCD out from its placement and tilt it upwards.

  • There are four wires that connect the LCD to the rest of the components. Make sure not to pull hard and break any of the wires.

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  • For the first of the four wires (furthest away from the wire that is held in by a screw), grab onto the connector and pull slowly.

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  • For the next connector, which is right next to the previous wire, there is a piece of tape that is sealing it to the board. Remove this first.

  • Next, grab onto the connector and slowly pull it from the socket in the logic board.

What is this connector for?

pdspanagel - Reply

I imagine this connector is going to be for display data (i.e. LCD data).

Scott Havard - Reply

I pretty much mangled this cable trying to put it back into the slot. Is this something I can order a replacement for?

Ryan Stryker - Reply

I also screwed up this wire.

erybovic - Reply

I also screwed up this wire. Wondering what the wire name is.

erybovic - Reply

  • For the connector on the other side of the logic board, grab the connector from underneath and carefully pull it from the board.

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  • For the last wire connecting to the LCD, use your TR 10 Screwdriver to remove the screw.

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  • The LCD has now been fully disconnected from the casing and can be repaired/replaced!

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  • Now you should have access to the rest of the display. From here, locate the fan.

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  • The fan is connected to the main logic board by two connectors. Make sure that while disconnecting them, grab the wire at the point closest to the board and the pull slowly to avoid damaging the connectors.

  • Remove the piece of tape that is holding the wires to the casing.

Remember which way the wire is connected. (top connector should have black wire at the top and bottom connector should have brown wire at the bottom). Both wires should have the “shiny” side facing you when inserting.

Per Lohmann Poulsen - Reply

  • Next, you can see that the fan is connected to the casing by three screws.

  • Use the TR 10 screwdriver to remove these three screws.

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  • Make sure to carefully remove the fan after it is free of the casing as to not damage surrounding parts.

  • Switch out the old fan with the new one and you're all set!

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Conclusion

To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

10 other people completed this guide.

Calvin Laverty

Member since: 04/14/2015

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I have been having trouble with fan noise -- a noisy, rapid thumping sound, especially on startup but getting worse over a few weeks and lately persisting all day. Following this excellent guide, I removed the fan and examined it. I could see nothing wrong except perhaps a fine layer of dust on the blades, no worse than could be expected. I did not manage to disassemble the fan itself, as its two-part housing is very firmly clipped together, but applied a vacuum cleaner hose to both the entry and exit sides to clean it up as much as possible. I put it back and reassembled the whole display, and am pleased to report that the noise has completely disappeared. This may be good news to anyone dismayed by the apparent non-availability of replacement fans.

John Canti - Reply

This guide made the power supply replacement quick and easy.

Jon Martinez - Reply

I had the rumbling fan cleaned by a pro. but the rattling didn't go. I just finished replacing the fan on my 27'' Thunderbolt Display using these instructions, and so far so good after 3 hours. It usually started the rattling after 30mn!

I purchased the fan on eBay. There were a couple available then.

I got the fan for $18 and spent 30mn on the job. At the Apple certified spot in town, they were going to charge me $250! I bought this Apple Display second hand for $250! and now it is back to its old self, working like a charm :)

Thank you very much for this web page which walked me through the process.

By the way, for a succion cup I used the two small ones that are attached to my soap holder, from the bathroom tiled wall; worked just fine and I didn't have to spend $20 to buy one.

cheers

ekoh dubois - Reply

Many thanks to Mr. Laverty and the other contributors. I followed this guide to install a new power supply in my darkened 27” Thunderbolt Display to bring it back from the dead. While the instructions were specifically for replacing the fan, I found that after following them to remove the LCD panel, it was easy to replace the power supply as well. For anyone else who may suspect a failed power supply (loud buzzing and then black), I ordered mine directly from China, supposedly a brand new one. It looks identical to the original in every way and does have a 2018 sticker affixed to it. It took a month to arrive but did the trick. I paid $70.50 for it from wwon_one off eBay (https://www.ebay.com/itm/273134311780). Thanks again for the extremely helpful guide!

ilovemybeagles - Reply

Many thanks to Mr. Laverty and the other contributors. I followed this guide to install a new power supply in my darkened 27” Thunderbolt Display to bring it back from the dead. While the instructions were specifically for replacing the fan, I found that after following them to remove the LCD panel, it was easy to replace the power supply as well. For anyone else who may suspect a failed power supply (loud buzzing and then black), I ordered mine directly from China, supposedly a brand new one. It looks identical to the original in every way and does have a 2018 sticker affixed to it. It took a month to arrive but did the trick. I paid $70.50 for it from wwon_one off eBay. Thanks again for the extremely helpful guide!

ilovemybeagles - Reply

I killed my Thunderbolt monitor while trying to follow this guide.

There is an aspect of my Thunderbolt monitor that is either different from the one shown above, or just not discussed in the write-up. One of the four cables connecting the front LCD and the back PCBs is a ribbon connector that’s held onto the PCB with a latch. The cable is very short, so the only way to connect it is to hold the LCD and glass *just* above the back panel. What’s more, the latch and ribbon are *extremely* delicate, and the latch *barely* holds the connector onto the PCB.

Long story short - once I disconnected that cable, I could not reattach it and get the latch to stay in place. I kept getting it just right, closing up the monitor, and plugging it in… only to find that it wouldn’t power on. By the fourth or fifth attempt, the latch was bent out of shape (seriously, it’s delicate) and the connector looked a little damaged.

I never got it to turn on again, and I hauled it to an Apple Store for recycling last weekend.

David Stein - Reply

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