Introduction

The following guide outlines the procedure for replacing the spark plugs in the 2.0 and 2.3 liter Duratec engines found in 2004-2007 Focus models. Replacement for OEM spark plugs is suggested every 60,000 miles.

For spark plugs that have an adjustable gap between the electrodes, the suggested gap is 0.050". OEM Motorcraft double platinum spark plugs, which are used in this guide, come pre-gapped and cannot be altered.

Image 1/1: Any particles that fall into the ignition cylinder could cause serious engine damage.
  • Use compressed air to clear any debris from the area around the ignition coils on top of the engine.

    • Any particles that fall into the ignition cylinder could cause serious engine damage.

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Image 1/3: Pull the connector straight away from the ignition coil to detach it. Image 2/3: Repeat this procedure for the remaining three ignition coils. Image 3/3: Repeat this procedure for the remaining three ignition coils.
  • Remove the ignition coil electrical connector by first depressing the plastic tab on top of the connector.

  • Pull the connector straight away from the ignition coil to detach it.

  • Repeat this procedure for the remaining three ignition coils.

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Image 1/3: Once the bolts are loose, they can be removed by hand. Image 2/3: Once the bolts are loose, they can be removed by hand. Image 3/3: Once the bolts are loose, they can be removed by hand.
  • Use an 8 mm deep socket to loosen the four ignition coil mounting bolts.

  • Once the bolts are loose, they can be removed by hand.

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Image 1/3: Avoid rocking the coil and boot side-to-side, since this could break the existing spark plug. Image 2/3: The procedure to remove the ignition coil and spark plug boot is the same for each spark plug. However, to reduce the chance of dirt entering the engine, only remove one at a time. Image 3/3: The procedure to remove the ignition coil and spark plug boot is the same for each spark plug. However, to reduce the chance of dirt entering the engine, only remove one at a time.
  • Twist the ignition coil and spark plug boot while lifting it straight up to remove it from the engine.

  • Avoid rocking the coil and boot side-to-side, since this could break the existing spark plug.

  • The procedure to remove the ignition coil and spark plug boot is the same for each spark plug. However, to reduce the chance of dirt entering the engine, only remove one at a time.

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Image 1/3: Spark plug sockets have rubber in the end of them to grip the spark plug and are made long enough to keep from snapping the spark plug. There are other common methods for removing spark plugs that involve using a long piece of rubber tubing to pull them out, but using a spark plug socket is the correct procedure. Image 2/3: Spark plug sockets have rubber in the end of them to grip the spark plug and are made long enough to keep from snapping the spark plug. There are other common methods for removing spark plugs that involve using a long piece of rubber tubing to pull them out, but using a spark plug socket is the correct procedure. Image 3/3: Spark plug sockets have rubber in the end of them to grip the spark plug and are made long enough to keep from snapping the spark plug. There are other common methods for removing spark plugs that involve using a long piece of rubber tubing to pull them out, but using a spark plug socket is the correct procedure.
  • Use a ratcheting socket wrench with an extender and a 5/8" spark plug socket to remove the existing spark plug from the cylinder head. Make sure that the spark plug is completely seated in the rubber end of the socket before loosening it.

    • Spark plug sockets have rubber in the end of them to grip the spark plug and are made long enough to keep from snapping the spark plug. There are other common methods for removing spark plugs that involve using a long piece of rubber tubing to pull them out, but using a spark plug socket is the correct procedure.

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Image 1/2: Gently place the spark plug boot over the ribs and twist the two pieces back and forth to even out the layer of dielectric grease. Image 2/2: Gently place the spark plug boot over the ribs and twist the two pieces back and forth to even out the layer of dielectric grease.
  • Apply dielectric grease to the ribbed portion of the insulator.

  • Gently place the spark plug boot over the ribs and twist the two pieces back and forth to even out the layer of dielectric grease.

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Image 1/2: Apply an even layer of anti-seize compound to the threads of the spark plug. Image 2/2: Be careful not to get any of the anti-seize compound on the spark plug's electrode.
  • Place the new spark plug firmly in the spark plug socket so that the threaded end sticks out.

  • Apply an even layer of anti-seize compound to the threads of the spark plug.

    • Be careful not to get any of the anti-seize compound on the spark plug's electrode.

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Image 1/3: Tighten the spark plugs to 11 ft-lbs with a torque wrench. Image 2/3: Tighten the spark plugs to 11 ft-lbs with a torque wrench. Image 3/3: Tighten the spark plugs to 11 ft-lbs with a torque wrench.
  • Place the new spark plug into the cylinder head and tighten it by hand as much as you can.

  • Tighten the spark plugs to 11 ft-lbs with a torque wrench.

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Image 1/2: Reconnect the ignition coil electrical connector by snapping it back into place. Image 2/2: After installing your new spark plugs, compare the old ones to a [http://www.bikebandit.com/assets/digital_assets/How-to-Read-a-Spark-Plug.gif|spark plug wear chart] to determine if there are any issues with the way your engine is running. A similar chart can be found in the back of all Haynes repair manuals.
  • Place the ignition coil and dust boot back over the spark plug by pushing down and twisting it into place.

  • Reconnect the ignition coil electrical connector by snapping it back into place.

  • After installing your new spark plugs, compare the old ones to a spark plug wear chart to determine if there are any issues with the way your engine is running. A similar chart can be found in the back of all Haynes repair manuals.

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Finish Line

15 other people completed this guide.

David Hodson

Member since: 04/13/2010

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136 Guides authored

5 Comments

Awesome guide. My Focus is exactly the same, Screaming Yellow! But can you put in a guide to change the air filter too?

rebeccakaise - Reply

but what if i did what you had shown. an it works for the couple of days an then it starts to bang each time you put it in gears . its like it lose power then it comes back on.. have a ford focus 4cyl 2.0 engine

Jose Velasquez - Reply

My focus st does not have power as I have just changed the spark plugs and I used the NGK ones . Are they the correct ones or can u recommend plugs to use .

Regards

Pat

Pat Mokoena - Reply

I have 2007 model Ford focus st and the problem I have started when I changed my spark plugs and now there is no power and can only ďrive oņ 40km per hour.

Please advice if the problem is the plugs as I used NGK or any other problem

Regards

Pat

Pat Mokoena - Reply

Can you tell me the correct gap on the Plugs for a Ford Focus 2006 model 5 door 16 engine size I know the gap must be spot on

E-mail address is jimdavidson63@icloud.com Thanks

Jim Davidson - Reply

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